West-end filmmaker screens sci-fi horror short at upcoming Blood in the Snow Film Festival

News Nov 09, 2014 by Lisa Rainford Bloor West Villager

One-time body double for Hollywood actor Ed Norton-turned corporate filmmaker Jon Hyatt has created his first short film, a sci-fi horror flick that is already garnering accolades on the festival circuit.

The 17-minute movie, Woods, is set in the wilderness three decades in the future when Richter, a man of means, is haunted by the disappearance of his wife. Is she dead or is she missing? Richter searches tirelessly every day for her in the woods next to his house where he constantly hears strange noises.

Concerned for his well-being, the man’s employer gifts Richter with a companion Android to help him cope, however, she becomes wary of Richter and begins looking for answers, exploring the woods on her own.

Hyatt, a father of two boys, three and two years of age, shot the film – which he also stars in – on his business partner’s property in Markham, on the cusp of Stouville. He had no intention of playing the lead role until the night before filming was to begin his star called to say he was really sick.

“He got shingles,” said Hyatt during an interview at a coffee shop in Bloor West Village, not far from his home. “I contacted five or six actors, but they didn’t want to do (the film) on such short notice. An actor friend of mine suggested I do it.”

A big believer in pre-production, Hyatt and his crew worked out every shot beforehand. A movie buff, Hyatt says he loves all genres, but gravitates towards horror and sci-fi, citing film favourites like 1980’s The Changeling starring George C. Scott about a man, who’s staying at a secluded mansion, finds himself being haunted by the presence of a spectre; Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho; and Ridley Scott’s science fiction horror film Alien.

It took Hyatt a year to complete the film. Ready for screening at the end of August, Woods was named the top film at a recent festival in California. It is set to screen in North Carolina, Saturday, Oct. 25 followed by a screening in Brazil. Woods will make its Toronto debut in November at the Blood in the Snow Film Festival, which takes place at The Carlton Cinema from Nov. 28 to 30.

Owner of KM4 Video Productions, Hyatt studied theatre at Unionville High School before playing in a band in his 20s throughout Toronto. He dabbled in stand-up comedy and later got a part in a CBS movie of the week and worked as an extra as well as a body double for Ed Norton on the movie Death to Smoochy. Yet, Hyatt was more interested in the behind-the-scenes moviemaking than being in front of the camera. He went on to direct music videos before moving on to corporate video creation.

Since 2007, Hyatt, his wife and kids had lived in the Bloor Street West and Dundas Street West-area before moving to Bloor West Village this summer.

“At the end of the day, I just want a lot of people to see it and enjoy it,” Hyatt said of Woods.

Filmmaking is not about ego for Hyatt. It’s simply about creating “good work.”

To see the trailer for Woods, visit www.youtube.com/watch?v=6LTiojt6-qU

For further details, visit www.iminthewoods.com and www.bloodinthesnow.ca

West-end filmmaker screens sci-fi horror short at upcoming Blood in the Snow Film Festival

Jon Hyatt’s Woods earning accolades on the festival circuit

News Nov 09, 2014 by Lisa Rainford Bloor West Villager

One-time body double for Hollywood actor Ed Norton-turned corporate filmmaker Jon Hyatt has created his first short film, a sci-fi horror flick that is already garnering accolades on the festival circuit.

The 17-minute movie, Woods, is set in the wilderness three decades in the future when Richter, a man of means, is haunted by the disappearance of his wife. Is she dead or is she missing? Richter searches tirelessly every day for her in the woods next to his house where he constantly hears strange noises.

Concerned for his well-being, the man’s employer gifts Richter with a companion Android to help him cope, however, she becomes wary of Richter and begins looking for answers, exploring the woods on her own.

Hyatt, a father of two boys, three and two years of age, shot the film – which he also stars in – on his business partner’s property in Markham, on the cusp of Stouville. He had no intention of playing the lead role until the night before filming was to begin his star called to say he was really sick.

“He got shingles,” said Hyatt during an interview at a coffee shop in Bloor West Village, not far from his home. “I contacted five or six actors, but they didn’t want to do (the film) on such short notice. An actor friend of mine suggested I do it.”

A big believer in pre-production, Hyatt and his crew worked out every shot beforehand. A movie buff, Hyatt says he loves all genres, but gravitates towards horror and sci-fi, citing film favourites like 1980’s The Changeling starring George C. Scott about a man, who’s staying at a secluded mansion, finds himself being haunted by the presence of a spectre; Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho; and Ridley Scott’s science fiction horror film Alien.

It took Hyatt a year to complete the film. Ready for screening at the end of August, Woods was named the top film at a recent festival in California. It is set to screen in North Carolina, Saturday, Oct. 25 followed by a screening in Brazil. Woods will make its Toronto debut in November at the Blood in the Snow Film Festival, which takes place at The Carlton Cinema from Nov. 28 to 30.

Owner of KM4 Video Productions, Hyatt studied theatre at Unionville High School before playing in a band in his 20s throughout Toronto. He dabbled in stand-up comedy and later got a part in a CBS movie of the week and worked as an extra as well as a body double for Ed Norton on the movie Death to Smoochy. Yet, Hyatt was more interested in the behind-the-scenes moviemaking than being in front of the camera. He went on to direct music videos before moving on to corporate video creation.

Since 2007, Hyatt, his wife and kids had lived in the Bloor Street West and Dundas Street West-area before moving to Bloor West Village this summer.

“At the end of the day, I just want a lot of people to see it and enjoy it,” Hyatt said of Woods.

Filmmaking is not about ego for Hyatt. It’s simply about creating “good work.”

To see the trailer for Woods, visit www.youtube.com/watch?v=6LTiojt6-qU

For further details, visit www.iminthewoods.com and www.bloodinthesnow.ca

West-end filmmaker screens sci-fi horror short at upcoming Blood in the Snow Film Festival

Jon Hyatt’s Woods earning accolades on the festival circuit

News Nov 09, 2014 by Lisa Rainford Bloor West Villager

One-time body double for Hollywood actor Ed Norton-turned corporate filmmaker Jon Hyatt has created his first short film, a sci-fi horror flick that is already garnering accolades on the festival circuit.

The 17-minute movie, Woods, is set in the wilderness three decades in the future when Richter, a man of means, is haunted by the disappearance of his wife. Is she dead or is she missing? Richter searches tirelessly every day for her in the woods next to his house where he constantly hears strange noises.

Concerned for his well-being, the man’s employer gifts Richter with a companion Android to help him cope, however, she becomes wary of Richter and begins looking for answers, exploring the woods on her own.

Hyatt, a father of two boys, three and two years of age, shot the film – which he also stars in – on his business partner’s property in Markham, on the cusp of Stouville. He had no intention of playing the lead role until the night before filming was to begin his star called to say he was really sick.

“He got shingles,” said Hyatt during an interview at a coffee shop in Bloor West Village, not far from his home. “I contacted five or six actors, but they didn’t want to do (the film) on such short notice. An actor friend of mine suggested I do it.”

A big believer in pre-production, Hyatt and his crew worked out every shot beforehand. A movie buff, Hyatt says he loves all genres, but gravitates towards horror and sci-fi, citing film favourites like 1980’s The Changeling starring George C. Scott about a man, who’s staying at a secluded mansion, finds himself being haunted by the presence of a spectre; Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho; and Ridley Scott’s science fiction horror film Alien.

It took Hyatt a year to complete the film. Ready for screening at the end of August, Woods was named the top film at a recent festival in California. It is set to screen in North Carolina, Saturday, Oct. 25 followed by a screening in Brazil. Woods will make its Toronto debut in November at the Blood in the Snow Film Festival, which takes place at The Carlton Cinema from Nov. 28 to 30.

Owner of KM4 Video Productions, Hyatt studied theatre at Unionville High School before playing in a band in his 20s throughout Toronto. He dabbled in stand-up comedy and later got a part in a CBS movie of the week and worked as an extra as well as a body double for Ed Norton on the movie Death to Smoochy. Yet, Hyatt was more interested in the behind-the-scenes moviemaking than being in front of the camera. He went on to direct music videos before moving on to corporate video creation.

Since 2007, Hyatt, his wife and kids had lived in the Bloor Street West and Dundas Street West-area before moving to Bloor West Village this summer.

“At the end of the day, I just want a lot of people to see it and enjoy it,” Hyatt said of Woods.

Filmmaking is not about ego for Hyatt. It’s simply about creating “good work.”

To see the trailer for Woods, visit www.youtube.com/watch?v=6LTiojt6-qU

For further details, visit www.iminthewoods.com and www.bloodinthesnow.ca