Makeover of Six Points interchange to begin in the fall

News Jul 24, 2014 by Tamara Shephard Etobicoke Guardian

Shovels will hit the ground this fall on the $40-million Six Points interchange reconfiguration.

City plans include replacing the existing Kipling-Bloor-Dundas interchange with three major at-grade intersections, each with a traffic light. Dundas Street West will turn slightly east so that it is parallel to Bloor Street West, west of Kipling Avenue. East of Kipling, Dundas will turn north and connect to Bloor at the existing intersection of Bloor and Dunbloor Road.

The area is known locally as “spaghetti junction” for its network of road interchanges connected with ramps.

Construction will be phased over three to four years.

Initial construction will begin this September. Utility relocations will occur throughout next year. The remainder of construction will begin next summer.

Early phases of construction will be focused on new sections of road that can be built with “minimal impact” to existing roads, Don Logie of Build Toronto said in an email comment.

“These new sections of road will be used in subsequent phases to accommodate redirected traffic to allow existing roads to be reconstructed or demolished,” Logie said. “Measures such as signed detours and temporary road connections will be taken to maintain road network continuity during construction.”

Signs will be installed prior to construction to notify the public of its timing and extent. Alternate route signing is also being considered, Logie said.

“It is anticipated that these measures will reduce traffic congestion during construction,” he said.

This fall, to travel from Kipling northbound to Dundas or Bloor eastbound, drivers will need to use St. Alban’s and Aukland roads. Drivers exiting the Kipling Subway Station passenger drop-off areas will also need to use St. Alban’s and Aukland roads to travel eastbound.

The city is reconfiguring the Six Points interchange with the intention it will foster development of the Etobicoke Centre area with higher quality public space that could also attract business and commercial operations.

YMCA of Greater Toronto officials have been in talks with City of Toronto staff in recent years about building a new YMCA on the grounds of the now-demolished Westwood Theatre lands at Bloor and Kipling.

A YMCA official was not immediately available for comment.

But Joe Arcaro, project director with HDR Corporation, confirmed city and YMCA officials have agreed on terms.

“Build Toronto and the YMCA have agreed on the basic terms for the Y to establish a new facility as part of a proposed development on the site located at the new Dundas Street and Kipling intersection. The deal is subject to a number of conditions which we are working on clearing,” Arcaro said in an email comment.

Etobicoke Centre runs along Dundas Street West from Shaver Avenue and Shorncliffe Road in the west to Montgomery Road in the east.

At present, existing roads are designed exclusively for motor vehicles.

MIXED USE, PEDESTRIAN-FRIENDLY STREETS

The city’s vision is to create a mixed-use, pedestrian-friendly street network that supports all modes of travel, reduces storm water issues and improves utilities.

“Active uses such as walking and cycling will enliven the public realm and make it a place to come to rather than pass through,” the city said in a public meeting presentation in June.

Residents’ opinions on the plan have been split over the years.

Some have favoured it, calling the existing interchange “a nightmare” and “ugly”. Others argued the plan’s call for more traffic signals will increase traffic congestion, and commute times.

The new Dundas Street West will feature dedicated bike lanes, a wide pedestrian boulevard, seating and plantings, including street trees.

Initial construction work this fall includes grading and installation of sanitary sewers along the Dundas Street realignment, and closure and removal of the Kipling northbound and Bloor eastbound ramp and northbound bus loop to Kipling northbound.

This fall, city staff will also finalize detailed design for future construction.

Utility relocations will begin this winter and next spring. The next phase of construction will begin next summer.

Construction on the project is estimated to take three to four years.

Makeover of Six Points interchange to begin in the fall

City envisions mixed-used, pedestrian-friendly plan for the “spaghetti junction”

News Jul 24, 2014 by Tamara Shephard Etobicoke Guardian

Shovels will hit the ground this fall on the $40-million Six Points interchange reconfiguration.

City plans include replacing the existing Kipling-Bloor-Dundas interchange with three major at-grade intersections, each with a traffic light. Dundas Street West will turn slightly east so that it is parallel to Bloor Street West, west of Kipling Avenue. East of Kipling, Dundas will turn north and connect to Bloor at the existing intersection of Bloor and Dunbloor Road.

The area is known locally as “spaghetti junction” for its network of road interchanges connected with ramps.

Construction will be phased over three to four years.

Initial construction will begin this September. Utility relocations will occur throughout next year. The remainder of construction will begin next summer.

Early phases of construction will be focused on new sections of road that can be built with “minimal impact” to existing roads, Don Logie of Build Toronto said in an email comment.

“These new sections of road will be used in subsequent phases to accommodate redirected traffic to allow existing roads to be reconstructed or demolished,” Logie said. “Measures such as signed detours and temporary road connections will be taken to maintain road network continuity during construction.”

Signs will be installed prior to construction to notify the public of its timing and extent. Alternate route signing is also being considered, Logie said.

“It is anticipated that these measures will reduce traffic congestion during construction,” he said.

This fall, to travel from Kipling northbound to Dundas or Bloor eastbound, drivers will need to use St. Alban’s and Aukland roads. Drivers exiting the Kipling Subway Station passenger drop-off areas will also need to use St. Alban’s and Aukland roads to travel eastbound.

The city is reconfiguring the Six Points interchange with the intention it will foster development of the Etobicoke Centre area with higher quality public space that could also attract business and commercial operations.

YMCA of Greater Toronto officials have been in talks with City of Toronto staff in recent years about building a new YMCA on the grounds of the now-demolished Westwood Theatre lands at Bloor and Kipling.

A YMCA official was not immediately available for comment.

But Joe Arcaro, project director with HDR Corporation, confirmed city and YMCA officials have agreed on terms.

“Build Toronto and the YMCA have agreed on the basic terms for the Y to establish a new facility as part of a proposed development on the site located at the new Dundas Street and Kipling intersection. The deal is subject to a number of conditions which we are working on clearing,” Arcaro said in an email comment.

Etobicoke Centre runs along Dundas Street West from Shaver Avenue and Shorncliffe Road in the west to Montgomery Road in the east.

At present, existing roads are designed exclusively for motor vehicles.

MIXED USE, PEDESTRIAN-FRIENDLY STREETS

The city’s vision is to create a mixed-use, pedestrian-friendly street network that supports all modes of travel, reduces storm water issues and improves utilities.

“Active uses such as walking and cycling will enliven the public realm and make it a place to come to rather than pass through,” the city said in a public meeting presentation in June.

Residents’ opinions on the plan have been split over the years.

Some have favoured it, calling the existing interchange “a nightmare” and “ugly”. Others argued the plan’s call for more traffic signals will increase traffic congestion, and commute times.

The new Dundas Street West will feature dedicated bike lanes, a wide pedestrian boulevard, seating and plantings, including street trees.

Initial construction work this fall includes grading and installation of sanitary sewers along the Dundas Street realignment, and closure and removal of the Kipling northbound and Bloor eastbound ramp and northbound bus loop to Kipling northbound.

This fall, city staff will also finalize detailed design for future construction.

Utility relocations will begin this winter and next spring. The next phase of construction will begin next summer.

Construction on the project is estimated to take three to four years.

Makeover of Six Points interchange to begin in the fall

City envisions mixed-used, pedestrian-friendly plan for the “spaghetti junction”

News Jul 24, 2014 by Tamara Shephard Etobicoke Guardian

Shovels will hit the ground this fall on the $40-million Six Points interchange reconfiguration.

City plans include replacing the existing Kipling-Bloor-Dundas interchange with three major at-grade intersections, each with a traffic light. Dundas Street West will turn slightly east so that it is parallel to Bloor Street West, west of Kipling Avenue. East of Kipling, Dundas will turn north and connect to Bloor at the existing intersection of Bloor and Dunbloor Road.

The area is known locally as “spaghetti junction” for its network of road interchanges connected with ramps.

Construction will be phased over three to four years.

Initial construction will begin this September. Utility relocations will occur throughout next year. The remainder of construction will begin next summer.

Early phases of construction will be focused on new sections of road that can be built with “minimal impact” to existing roads, Don Logie of Build Toronto said in an email comment.

“These new sections of road will be used in subsequent phases to accommodate redirected traffic to allow existing roads to be reconstructed or demolished,” Logie said. “Measures such as signed detours and temporary road connections will be taken to maintain road network continuity during construction.”

Signs will be installed prior to construction to notify the public of its timing and extent. Alternate route signing is also being considered, Logie said.

“It is anticipated that these measures will reduce traffic congestion during construction,” he said.

This fall, to travel from Kipling northbound to Dundas or Bloor eastbound, drivers will need to use St. Alban’s and Aukland roads. Drivers exiting the Kipling Subway Station passenger drop-off areas will also need to use St. Alban’s and Aukland roads to travel eastbound.

The city is reconfiguring the Six Points interchange with the intention it will foster development of the Etobicoke Centre area with higher quality public space that could also attract business and commercial operations.

YMCA of Greater Toronto officials have been in talks with City of Toronto staff in recent years about building a new YMCA on the grounds of the now-demolished Westwood Theatre lands at Bloor and Kipling.

A YMCA official was not immediately available for comment.

But Joe Arcaro, project director with HDR Corporation, confirmed city and YMCA officials have agreed on terms.

“Build Toronto and the YMCA have agreed on the basic terms for the Y to establish a new facility as part of a proposed development on the site located at the new Dundas Street and Kipling intersection. The deal is subject to a number of conditions which we are working on clearing,” Arcaro said in an email comment.

Etobicoke Centre runs along Dundas Street West from Shaver Avenue and Shorncliffe Road in the west to Montgomery Road in the east.

At present, existing roads are designed exclusively for motor vehicles.

MIXED USE, PEDESTRIAN-FRIENDLY STREETS

The city’s vision is to create a mixed-use, pedestrian-friendly street network that supports all modes of travel, reduces storm water issues and improves utilities.

“Active uses such as walking and cycling will enliven the public realm and make it a place to come to rather than pass through,” the city said in a public meeting presentation in June.

Residents’ opinions on the plan have been split over the years.

Some have favoured it, calling the existing interchange “a nightmare” and “ugly”. Others argued the plan’s call for more traffic signals will increase traffic congestion, and commute times.

The new Dundas Street West will feature dedicated bike lanes, a wide pedestrian boulevard, seating and plantings, including street trees.

Initial construction work this fall includes grading and installation of sanitary sewers along the Dundas Street realignment, and closure and removal of the Kipling northbound and Bloor eastbound ramp and northbound bus loop to Kipling northbound.

This fall, city staff will also finalize detailed design for future construction.

Utility relocations will begin this winter and next spring. The next phase of construction will begin next summer.

Construction on the project is estimated to take three to four years.