Residents celebrate opening of Sorauren Park Town Square

News Jul 08, 2014 by Natalie Chu Parkdale Villager

After weeks of construction delays, the new Sorauren Park Town Square is finally here.

Despite a hot and humid Monday night, residents of Parkdale and Roncesvalles Village were eager to welcome the city’s newest public space.

Hundreds of people chanted, “This is not gravy!” as men tore down the blue fencing separating the new public space from the rest of the park.

The space was outfitted with new pavement, a lush lawn and planted trees residents quickly began to water at the opening. Students of Howard Junior Public School also held a dance-a-thon fundraiser to install two new benches in the park.

“I see flash mobs and festivals ahead,” MPP Cheri DiNovo said to the crowd. Shortly after the opening speeches, a zumba class began in the new square amidst the festivities.

Local city councillor Gord Perks also spoke to the crowd, thanking the Wabash Building Society for its continued efforts in creating a multi-purpose space.

“Already we see people out singing and dancing together and we’re going to be able to get a much more vibrant farmers’ market and movie nights and ways of just bringing the whole neighbourhood together,” Perks said in an interview.

“This is a space that the city and the neighbourhood built together,” he said.

But city staff weren’t the only ones eager to discuss the neighbourhood’s achievement.

“It’s like a relay race,” said Mary Hurley, a resident of the area for nearly 30 years. She remembered when the community first broke ground for the park and has witnessed the transformation of the area from an old TTC garage.

“More people are getting involved and these developments have boosted the neighbourhood,” she said.

Another resident, Stephen Dorsey, brought his wife and young daughter to the opening. He said the space gives children a much-needed chance to get out and play. “It’s wonderful, lots of families are moving in and this is really a community effort,” Dorsey said.

“We’re definitely heading in the right direction,” he said.

With the first phase complete, city staff were eager to remind residents of fundraising for phase two which would install new park furniture, a community bake oven, a trellis to hang a movie screen and the biggest project: turning the old linseed factory in the square into a new community centre.

“Now that we’ve opened the square we have one thing left, the community centre,” Perks said.

“We still have work to do.”

Residents celebrate opening of Sorauren Park Town Square

Phase two will see the old linseed factory in the square turned into a new community centre

News Jul 08, 2014 by Natalie Chu Parkdale Villager

After weeks of construction delays, the new Sorauren Park Town Square is finally here.

Despite a hot and humid Monday night, residents of Parkdale and Roncesvalles Village were eager to welcome the city’s newest public space.

Hundreds of people chanted, “This is not gravy!” as men tore down the blue fencing separating the new public space from the rest of the park.

The space was outfitted with new pavement, a lush lawn and planted trees residents quickly began to water at the opening. Students of Howard Junior Public School also held a dance-a-thon fundraiser to install two new benches in the park.

“I see flash mobs and festivals ahead,” MPP Cheri DiNovo said to the crowd. Shortly after the opening speeches, a zumba class began in the new square amidst the festivities.

Local city councillor Gord Perks also spoke to the crowd, thanking the Wabash Building Society for its continued efforts in creating a multi-purpose space.

“Already we see people out singing and dancing together and we’re going to be able to get a much more vibrant farmers’ market and movie nights and ways of just bringing the whole neighbourhood together,” Perks said in an interview.

“This is a space that the city and the neighbourhood built together,” he said.

But city staff weren’t the only ones eager to discuss the neighbourhood’s achievement.

“It’s like a relay race,” said Mary Hurley, a resident of the area for nearly 30 years. She remembered when the community first broke ground for the park and has witnessed the transformation of the area from an old TTC garage.

“More people are getting involved and these developments have boosted the neighbourhood,” she said.

Another resident, Stephen Dorsey, brought his wife and young daughter to the opening. He said the space gives children a much-needed chance to get out and play. “It’s wonderful, lots of families are moving in and this is really a community effort,” Dorsey said.

“We’re definitely heading in the right direction,” he said.

With the first phase complete, city staff were eager to remind residents of fundraising for phase two which would install new park furniture, a community bake oven, a trellis to hang a movie screen and the biggest project: turning the old linseed factory in the square into a new community centre.

“Now that we’ve opened the square we have one thing left, the community centre,” Perks said.

“We still have work to do.”

Residents celebrate opening of Sorauren Park Town Square

Phase two will see the old linseed factory in the square turned into a new community centre

News Jul 08, 2014 by Natalie Chu Parkdale Villager

After weeks of construction delays, the new Sorauren Park Town Square is finally here.

Despite a hot and humid Monday night, residents of Parkdale and Roncesvalles Village were eager to welcome the city’s newest public space.

Hundreds of people chanted, “This is not gravy!” as men tore down the blue fencing separating the new public space from the rest of the park.

The space was outfitted with new pavement, a lush lawn and planted trees residents quickly began to water at the opening. Students of Howard Junior Public School also held a dance-a-thon fundraiser to install two new benches in the park.

“I see flash mobs and festivals ahead,” MPP Cheri DiNovo said to the crowd. Shortly after the opening speeches, a zumba class began in the new square amidst the festivities.

Local city councillor Gord Perks also spoke to the crowd, thanking the Wabash Building Society for its continued efforts in creating a multi-purpose space.

“Already we see people out singing and dancing together and we’re going to be able to get a much more vibrant farmers’ market and movie nights and ways of just bringing the whole neighbourhood together,” Perks said in an interview.

“This is a space that the city and the neighbourhood built together,” he said.

But city staff weren’t the only ones eager to discuss the neighbourhood’s achievement.

“It’s like a relay race,” said Mary Hurley, a resident of the area for nearly 30 years. She remembered when the community first broke ground for the park and has witnessed the transformation of the area from an old TTC garage.

“More people are getting involved and these developments have boosted the neighbourhood,” she said.

Another resident, Stephen Dorsey, brought his wife and young daughter to the opening. He said the space gives children a much-needed chance to get out and play. “It’s wonderful, lots of families are moving in and this is really a community effort,” Dorsey said.

“We’re definitely heading in the right direction,” he said.

With the first phase complete, city staff were eager to remind residents of fundraising for phase two which would install new park furniture, a community bake oven, a trellis to hang a movie screen and the biggest project: turning the old linseed factory in the square into a new community centre.

“Now that we’ve opened the square we have one thing left, the community centre,” Perks said.

“We still have work to do.”