Christian Resource Centre christened CRC to mark its 50th year helping those in need in Regent Park

News Apr 15, 2014 by Justin Skinner City Centre Mirror

Having settled into its new digs in a pristine building at 40 Oak St. the CRC is looking forward to the opportunities that will come along with the ongoing revitalization of Regent Park.

The organization is now in its 50th year serving the community in the area. Long known as the Christian Resource Centre, it is moving toward the CRC moniker to better reflect the fact that it serves a wide array of people from all faiths.

The centre offers two main streams of programming – food support and housing – and showcased the many services it provides at a recent open house.

“As part of the redevelopment of Regent Park, we’ve been able to move into this new building and now in addition to our meal, food and gardening programs, we’re able to provide 87 units of what we call deeply affordable housing,” said CRC fund development manager Bruce Voogd. “Affordable housing is defined at 80 per cent of market rent, but the people who live with us can’t afford that. The people living here pay between $150 and $500 a month, depending on their situation.”

Many of the residents of 40 Oaks are dealing with mental health or addiction issues, or have lived on the streets for years, meaning the housing provided is a much-needed support.

The CRC also runs a rooming house just east of the Don Valley with room for 10 people.

“There’s such a need for housing,” Voogd said during the Thursday, April 10 showcase. “What we offer is just a drop in the bucket.”

The housing is a huge benefit to residents such as artist Neil Amitay, who has lived in the building since it opened.

“Everyone in the building knows everyone else, and people living in the building can come down here and get food,” he said. “I don’t use the meal programs, but they let me set up my art here and there’s really good, cheap laundry which is great.”

The CRC’s food programs include free community breakfasts on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, and community lunches on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. Recently, the centre has added weekly family dinners to its events.

“We’re encouraging local families with kids to come out and help with the set-up, and we invite poets and musicians to come out and make it more of an event,” said CRC community food centre manager Liz Curran.

This spring and summer, the CRC will be able to boost its food programs even more. A new community garden will be planted on the lawn in front of 40 Oak St., with local residents invited to help tend to it.

Those who participate will split the food grown there equally with the CRC’s meal programs.

The organization will also oversee a community garden, greenhouse and bake oven in the new green space just east of its location once work there is complete.

“That’s a way to bring the whole community together,” Voogd said. “With the redevelopment, there’s a whole new group of people moving in and this will be a great way to help people meet each other.”

In addition to those programs, the CRC offers drop-in services with all kinds of activities for community residents.

“We have a music program where anyone who can play and sing can drop in – you teach me your music and I’ll teach you mine,” said CRC drop-in co-ordinator Raymond Mallozzi. “We have table games and board games, we’re starting a running club at the end of the month, we have an arts drop-in and yoga. There’s a lot going on.”

Some of the CRC’s funding comes through rent from its housing and from the City of Toronto, but the majority comes from donations.

For more information on the organization or to make a donation, visit www.tcrc.ca

Christian Resource Centre christened CRC to mark its 50th year helping those in need in Regent Park

News Apr 15, 2014 by Justin Skinner City Centre Mirror

Having settled into its new digs in a pristine building at 40 Oak St. the CRC is looking forward to the opportunities that will come along with the ongoing revitalization of Regent Park.

The organization is now in its 50th year serving the community in the area. Long known as the Christian Resource Centre, it is moving toward the CRC moniker to better reflect the fact that it serves a wide array of people from all faiths.

The centre offers two main streams of programming – food support and housing – and showcased the many services it provides at a recent open house.

“As part of the redevelopment of Regent Park, we’ve been able to move into this new building and now in addition to our meal, food and gardening programs, we’re able to provide 87 units of what we call deeply affordable housing,” said CRC fund development manager Bruce Voogd. “Affordable housing is defined at 80 per cent of market rent, but the people who live with us can’t afford that. The people living here pay between $150 and $500 a month, depending on their situation.”

Many of the residents of 40 Oaks are dealing with mental health or addiction issues, or have lived on the streets for years, meaning the housing provided is a much-needed support.

The CRC also runs a rooming house just east of the Don Valley with room for 10 people.

“There’s such a need for housing,” Voogd said during the Thursday, April 10 showcase. “What we offer is just a drop in the bucket.”

The housing is a huge benefit to residents such as artist Neil Amitay, who has lived in the building since it opened.

“Everyone in the building knows everyone else, and people living in the building can come down here and get food,” he said. “I don’t use the meal programs, but they let me set up my art here and there’s really good, cheap laundry which is great.”

The CRC’s food programs include free community breakfasts on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, and community lunches on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. Recently, the centre has added weekly family dinners to its events.

“We’re encouraging local families with kids to come out and help with the set-up, and we invite poets and musicians to come out and make it more of an event,” said CRC community food centre manager Liz Curran.

This spring and summer, the CRC will be able to boost its food programs even more. A new community garden will be planted on the lawn in front of 40 Oak St., with local residents invited to help tend to it.

Those who participate will split the food grown there equally with the CRC’s meal programs.

The organization will also oversee a community garden, greenhouse and bake oven in the new green space just east of its location once work there is complete.

“That’s a way to bring the whole community together,” Voogd said. “With the redevelopment, there’s a whole new group of people moving in and this will be a great way to help people meet each other.”

In addition to those programs, the CRC offers drop-in services with all kinds of activities for community residents.

“We have a music program where anyone who can play and sing can drop in – you teach me your music and I’ll teach you mine,” said CRC drop-in co-ordinator Raymond Mallozzi. “We have table games and board games, we’re starting a running club at the end of the month, we have an arts drop-in and yoga. There’s a lot going on.”

Some of the CRC’s funding comes through rent from its housing and from the City of Toronto, but the majority comes from donations.

For more information on the organization or to make a donation, visit www.tcrc.ca

Christian Resource Centre christened CRC to mark its 50th year helping those in need in Regent Park

News Apr 15, 2014 by Justin Skinner City Centre Mirror

Having settled into its new digs in a pristine building at 40 Oak St. the CRC is looking forward to the opportunities that will come along with the ongoing revitalization of Regent Park.

The organization is now in its 50th year serving the community in the area. Long known as the Christian Resource Centre, it is moving toward the CRC moniker to better reflect the fact that it serves a wide array of people from all faiths.

The centre offers two main streams of programming – food support and housing – and showcased the many services it provides at a recent open house.

“As part of the redevelopment of Regent Park, we’ve been able to move into this new building and now in addition to our meal, food and gardening programs, we’re able to provide 87 units of what we call deeply affordable housing,” said CRC fund development manager Bruce Voogd. “Affordable housing is defined at 80 per cent of market rent, but the people who live with us can’t afford that. The people living here pay between $150 and $500 a month, depending on their situation.”

Many of the residents of 40 Oaks are dealing with mental health or addiction issues, or have lived on the streets for years, meaning the housing provided is a much-needed support.

The CRC also runs a rooming house just east of the Don Valley with room for 10 people.

“There’s such a need for housing,” Voogd said during the Thursday, April 10 showcase. “What we offer is just a drop in the bucket.”

The housing is a huge benefit to residents such as artist Neil Amitay, who has lived in the building since it opened.

“Everyone in the building knows everyone else, and people living in the building can come down here and get food,” he said. “I don’t use the meal programs, but they let me set up my art here and there’s really good, cheap laundry which is great.”

The CRC’s food programs include free community breakfasts on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, and community lunches on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. Recently, the centre has added weekly family dinners to its events.

“We’re encouraging local families with kids to come out and help with the set-up, and we invite poets and musicians to come out and make it more of an event,” said CRC community food centre manager Liz Curran.

This spring and summer, the CRC will be able to boost its food programs even more. A new community garden will be planted on the lawn in front of 40 Oak St., with local residents invited to help tend to it.

Those who participate will split the food grown there equally with the CRC’s meal programs.

The organization will also oversee a community garden, greenhouse and bake oven in the new green space just east of its location once work there is complete.

“That’s a way to bring the whole community together,” Voogd said. “With the redevelopment, there’s a whole new group of people moving in and this will be a great way to help people meet each other.”

In addition to those programs, the CRC offers drop-in services with all kinds of activities for community residents.

“We have a music program where anyone who can play and sing can drop in – you teach me your music and I’ll teach you mine,” said CRC drop-in co-ordinator Raymond Mallozzi. “We have table games and board games, we’re starting a running club at the end of the month, we have an arts drop-in and yoga. There’s a lot going on.”

Some of the CRC’s funding comes through rent from its housing and from the City of Toronto, but the majority comes from donations.

For more information on the organization or to make a donation, visit www.tcrc.ca