City to plant at least 1,000 trees to replace those cut in Guild Park

News Apr 09, 2014 by Mike Adler Scarborough Mirror

Guild Park still looks wounded, but residents of the surrounding Guildwood neighbourhood were told this week the wounds will heal.

Several at a meeting demanded the City of Toronto remove logs, stumps or the piles of brush and wood chips left behind after eight weeks of cutting in the park, a mess one man called “a horrendous eyesore.”

Forestry staff said the park by the Scarborough Bluffs will look better after 1,156 trees and 1,403 shrubs are planted this spring to replace around 2,500 trees removed this winter.

While not pledging to replant every inch of damaged forest in the 88-acre expanse, Beth McEwen, manager of urban forestry renewal, said the city is committed to manage and protect it.

“I expect it not to be diminished in any way,” she added before 200 residents Monday at Sir Wilfrid Laurier Collegiate.

The city, hit with a devastating December ice storm amid the spread of a tree-killing beetle called the emerald ash borer, hired a logging company to harvest dead and dying trees at the Guild and South Marine Park, another green space beside the Bluffs where at least 1,000 trees and shrubs will be planted.

Ash, on which the beetle exclusively feeds, is very common along the Scarborough shoreline, where McEwen said the beetle has infested all of them, though at least 500 ash in Guild Park and hundreds more on nearby streets have been injected with TreeAzin, a pesticide which could save them.

Ash-borer damage is hard to spot until the beetle has carved up the living layer below the bark and the tree is dying.

The city, McEwen said, could not take down so many trees in the parks one by one, and its winter cull left almost no soil damage in the frozen ground, though equipment damaged healthy trees as logs were pulled out.

She also said herbicide would be used to eliminate buckthorn and dog-strangling vine - aggressive plants which would otherwise spread in both parks - but signs will be posted to warn residents when the chemicals are used. “If you’re staying on trails, there would be no exposure.”

Necessary or not, the harvest at the Guild enraged some residents.

“This was a complete and utter shock to our system,” said Sherri Lange, a member of the Save the Guild group which served loggers with “eviction” notices last month and threatened to blockade the park to stop herbicide use.

Lange complained about the “paucity of information” offered to residents about the cutting, adding anyone who isn’t shocked by Guild Park’s condition doesn’t know how much the forest means to residents. “Many of us moved here because of the forest.”

Other residents thanked forestry staff for what they considered to have been a job well done.

Donna Milovanovic, president of the Guildwood Village Community Association, later said the plan for cutting and replanting at the Guild was well-thought-out.

“It’s unfortunate it looks so awful, but I’m expecting that it will be done properly and responsibly,” she said.

Several people offered to help plant trees and seemed disappointed when staff, citing liability and trampling damage as concerns, did not agree to accept their help.

“We do have some areas in mind (where residents could plant trees) but they’re not ready,” McEwen said.

Residents are invited to an April 29 meeting from 7 to 9 p.m. in the school’s cafeteria to discuss a Guild Park and Gardens Management Plan, which will cover maintenance of Guild Park’s forest and natural heritage features, cultural artifacts, trails, and gardens.

That plan is a good way to have the park users and operators, who are working for the same goals, start to co-operate, said John Mason, president of a volunteer group called Friends of Guild Park and Gardens.

City council last week approved a Letter of Intent for a deal allowing Toronto-based Dynamic Hospitality and Entertainment to refurbish and expand the former Guild Inn and to run a restaurant and banquet hall there.

Scarborough East Councillor Paul Ainslie said the city’s only “secret” involving Dynamic - the city’s latest partner in a decade of attempts to revive the landmark building - are continuing negotiations on property taxes and rent the company would pay.

City to plant at least 1,000 trees to replace those cut in Guild Park

Emerald ash borer, ice storm damage led to removal of about 2,500 trees over winter

News Apr 09, 2014 by Mike Adler Scarborough Mirror

Guild Park still looks wounded, but residents of the surrounding Guildwood neighbourhood were told this week the wounds will heal.

Several at a meeting demanded the City of Toronto remove logs, stumps or the piles of brush and wood chips left behind after eight weeks of cutting in the park, a mess one man called “a horrendous eyesore.”

Forestry staff said the park by the Scarborough Bluffs will look better after 1,156 trees and 1,403 shrubs are planted this spring to replace around 2,500 trees removed this winter.

While not pledging to replant every inch of damaged forest in the 88-acre expanse, Beth McEwen, manager of urban forestry renewal, said the city is committed to manage and protect it.

“I expect it not to be diminished in any way,” she added before 200 residents Monday at Sir Wilfrid Laurier Collegiate.

The city, hit with a devastating December ice storm amid the spread of a tree-killing beetle called the emerald ash borer, hired a logging company to harvest dead and dying trees at the Guild and South Marine Park, another green space beside the Bluffs where at least 1,000 trees and shrubs will be planted.

Ash, on which the beetle exclusively feeds, is very common along the Scarborough shoreline, where McEwen said the beetle has infested all of them, though at least 500 ash in Guild Park and hundreds more on nearby streets have been injected with TreeAzin, a pesticide which could save them.

Ash-borer damage is hard to spot until the beetle has carved up the living layer below the bark and the tree is dying.

The city, McEwen said, could not take down so many trees in the parks one by one, and its winter cull left almost no soil damage in the frozen ground, though equipment damaged healthy trees as logs were pulled out.

She also said herbicide would be used to eliminate buckthorn and dog-strangling vine - aggressive plants which would otherwise spread in both parks - but signs will be posted to warn residents when the chemicals are used. “If you’re staying on trails, there would be no exposure.”

Necessary or not, the harvest at the Guild enraged some residents.

“This was a complete and utter shock to our system,” said Sherri Lange, a member of the Save the Guild group which served loggers with “eviction” notices last month and threatened to blockade the park to stop herbicide use.

Lange complained about the “paucity of information” offered to residents about the cutting, adding anyone who isn’t shocked by Guild Park’s condition doesn’t know how much the forest means to residents. “Many of us moved here because of the forest.”

Other residents thanked forestry staff for what they considered to have been a job well done.

Donna Milovanovic, president of the Guildwood Village Community Association, later said the plan for cutting and replanting at the Guild was well-thought-out.

“It’s unfortunate it looks so awful, but I’m expecting that it will be done properly and responsibly,” she said.

Several people offered to help plant trees and seemed disappointed when staff, citing liability and trampling damage as concerns, did not agree to accept their help.

“We do have some areas in mind (where residents could plant trees) but they’re not ready,” McEwen said.

Residents are invited to an April 29 meeting from 7 to 9 p.m. in the school’s cafeteria to discuss a Guild Park and Gardens Management Plan, which will cover maintenance of Guild Park’s forest and natural heritage features, cultural artifacts, trails, and gardens.

That plan is a good way to have the park users and operators, who are working for the same goals, start to co-operate, said John Mason, president of a volunteer group called Friends of Guild Park and Gardens.

City council last week approved a Letter of Intent for a deal allowing Toronto-based Dynamic Hospitality and Entertainment to refurbish and expand the former Guild Inn and to run a restaurant and banquet hall there.

Scarborough East Councillor Paul Ainslie said the city’s only “secret” involving Dynamic - the city’s latest partner in a decade of attempts to revive the landmark building - are continuing negotiations on property taxes and rent the company would pay.

City to plant at least 1,000 trees to replace those cut in Guild Park

Emerald ash borer, ice storm damage led to removal of about 2,500 trees over winter

News Apr 09, 2014 by Mike Adler Scarborough Mirror

Guild Park still looks wounded, but residents of the surrounding Guildwood neighbourhood were told this week the wounds will heal.

Several at a meeting demanded the City of Toronto remove logs, stumps or the piles of brush and wood chips left behind after eight weeks of cutting in the park, a mess one man called “a horrendous eyesore.”

Forestry staff said the park by the Scarborough Bluffs will look better after 1,156 trees and 1,403 shrubs are planted this spring to replace around 2,500 trees removed this winter.

While not pledging to replant every inch of damaged forest in the 88-acre expanse, Beth McEwen, manager of urban forestry renewal, said the city is committed to manage and protect it.

“I expect it not to be diminished in any way,” she added before 200 residents Monday at Sir Wilfrid Laurier Collegiate.

The city, hit with a devastating December ice storm amid the spread of a tree-killing beetle called the emerald ash borer, hired a logging company to harvest dead and dying trees at the Guild and South Marine Park, another green space beside the Bluffs where at least 1,000 trees and shrubs will be planted.

Ash, on which the beetle exclusively feeds, is very common along the Scarborough shoreline, where McEwen said the beetle has infested all of them, though at least 500 ash in Guild Park and hundreds more on nearby streets have been injected with TreeAzin, a pesticide which could save them.

Ash-borer damage is hard to spot until the beetle has carved up the living layer below the bark and the tree is dying.

The city, McEwen said, could not take down so many trees in the parks one by one, and its winter cull left almost no soil damage in the frozen ground, though equipment damaged healthy trees as logs were pulled out.

She also said herbicide would be used to eliminate buckthorn and dog-strangling vine - aggressive plants which would otherwise spread in both parks - but signs will be posted to warn residents when the chemicals are used. “If you’re staying on trails, there would be no exposure.”

Necessary or not, the harvest at the Guild enraged some residents.

“This was a complete and utter shock to our system,” said Sherri Lange, a member of the Save the Guild group which served loggers with “eviction” notices last month and threatened to blockade the park to stop herbicide use.

Lange complained about the “paucity of information” offered to residents about the cutting, adding anyone who isn’t shocked by Guild Park’s condition doesn’t know how much the forest means to residents. “Many of us moved here because of the forest.”

Other residents thanked forestry staff for what they considered to have been a job well done.

Donna Milovanovic, president of the Guildwood Village Community Association, later said the plan for cutting and replanting at the Guild was well-thought-out.

“It’s unfortunate it looks so awful, but I’m expecting that it will be done properly and responsibly,” she said.

Several people offered to help plant trees and seemed disappointed when staff, citing liability and trampling damage as concerns, did not agree to accept their help.

“We do have some areas in mind (where residents could plant trees) but they’re not ready,” McEwen said.

Residents are invited to an April 29 meeting from 7 to 9 p.m. in the school’s cafeteria to discuss a Guild Park and Gardens Management Plan, which will cover maintenance of Guild Park’s forest and natural heritage features, cultural artifacts, trails, and gardens.

That plan is a good way to have the park users and operators, who are working for the same goals, start to co-operate, said John Mason, president of a volunteer group called Friends of Guild Park and Gardens.

City council last week approved a Letter of Intent for a deal allowing Toronto-based Dynamic Hospitality and Entertainment to refurbish and expand the former Guild Inn and to run a restaurant and banquet hall there.

Scarborough East Councillor Paul Ainslie said the city’s only “secret” involving Dynamic - the city’s latest partner in a decade of attempts to revive the landmark building - are continuing negotiations on property taxes and rent the company would pay.