Bloor Street is now a ‘culture corridor’

News Apr 03, 2014 by Justin Skinner City Centre Mirror

A roughly one-mile stretch of Bloor Street housing a dozen unique arts and culture destinations has earned a new designation as the Bloor Street Culture Corridor (BSCC).

The length of road between Bathurst and Bay streets was branded as such at a special event on Wednesday, April 2 at L’Espresso Bar Mercurio. The new culture corridor includes a variety of museums, arts venues and institutions devoted to French, Italian, Japanese and Jewish culture.

“There’s this great ‘aha’ moment that happens and people’s eyes light up when we realize that there’s a dozen arts and cultural organizations all within a mile, or just over a kilometre and a half, right here on Bloor Street,” said Heather Kelly, who works with the Royal Conservatory of Music and who founded the idea of the cultural corridor.

“We can easily take the TTC to get here – there are five subway stops along the Bloor Street Culture Corridor – and walk from a museum to an afternoon art talk to an exhibition, do a bit of shopping, grab lunch or dinner and enjoy an inspiring concert or film all within just a few blocks.”

The corridor will see the 12 attractions working more closely to draw more patrons and highlight the offerings along the stretch of road. The organizations that are part of the collaboration are the Bloor Hot Docs Cinema, Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra and Choir, the Toronto Consort, the Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre, the Native Canadian Centre of Toronto, Alliance Francaise de Toronto, the Istitudo Italiano di Cultura, the Royal Conservatory of Music, the Royal Ontario Museum, the Gardiner Museum, the Bata Shoe Museum and the Japan Foundation.

“We believe that the Bloor Street Culture Corridor will benefit the public, the neighbourhood, the arts and culture community, the tourism industry and the City of Toronto,” Kelly said.

Deputy Mayor Norm Kelly said the launch of the corridor marked another step in Toronto’s evolution into a top-notch destination.

“This is an exciting city to live in – not the city I was born into or raised, but it absolutely has become a world-class city,” he said.

The cultural corridor is working with the City, Tourism Toronto, the Bloor-Yorkville BIA, the Annex BIA and the Ontario Arts Council to boost its profile and increase the number of visits.

Councillor Michael Thompson, who chairs the city’s Economic Development and Culture Committee, said the BSCC was the type of idea that could be rolled out in other neighbourhoods that boast a wealth of cultural institutions, though he noted that Bloor Street between Bay and Bathurst is particularly rich in that way.

“The 12 organizations that comprise the corridor already attract some two million people to their facilities each year,” he said. “By rallying around a new collaborative cultural banner, the potential for mutual growth is extremely exciting for our community and our city.”

The launch was also attended by local councillors Adam Vaughan and Kristyn Wong-Tam. The BSCC is located in Vaughan’s ward, while Wong-Tam, a champion of the arts in Toronto, represents the area just east of the corridor.

Vaughan stressed that there is more to culture in the city than simply drawing attention to the institutions along Bloor.

“We have to make sure when we talk about culture, on Bloor Street, we also talk about the capacity to house artists,” he said.

Japan Foundation executive director Takashi Ishida said the BSCC would benefit all businesses along the stretch of Bloor and would help the 12 organizations who are part of the collaboration to build their client and patron bases.

“We can mutually help each other and each other’s patrons by (bridging) borders and sharing,” he said. “The interactions will enhance all our client bases.”

For more information on the BSCC, visit www.bloorstculturecorridor.com or www.facebook.com/bloorstculturecorridor, or follow @bloorstculture on Twitter.

Bloor Street is now a ‘culture corridor’

Dozen cultural institutions are all located within a mile of each other

News Apr 03, 2014 by Justin Skinner City Centre Mirror

A roughly one-mile stretch of Bloor Street housing a dozen unique arts and culture destinations has earned a new designation as the Bloor Street Culture Corridor (BSCC).

The length of road between Bathurst and Bay streets was branded as such at a special event on Wednesday, April 2 at L’Espresso Bar Mercurio. The new culture corridor includes a variety of museums, arts venues and institutions devoted to French, Italian, Japanese and Jewish culture.

“There’s this great ‘aha’ moment that happens and people’s eyes light up when we realize that there’s a dozen arts and cultural organizations all within a mile, or just over a kilometre and a half, right here on Bloor Street,” said Heather Kelly, who works with the Royal Conservatory of Music and who founded the idea of the cultural corridor.

“We can easily take the TTC to get here – there are five subway stops along the Bloor Street Culture Corridor – and walk from a museum to an afternoon art talk to an exhibition, do a bit of shopping, grab lunch or dinner and enjoy an inspiring concert or film all within just a few blocks.”

The corridor will see the 12 attractions working more closely to draw more patrons and highlight the offerings along the stretch of road. The organizations that are part of the collaboration are the Bloor Hot Docs Cinema, Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra and Choir, the Toronto Consort, the Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre, the Native Canadian Centre of Toronto, Alliance Francaise de Toronto, the Istitudo Italiano di Cultura, the Royal Conservatory of Music, the Royal Ontario Museum, the Gardiner Museum, the Bata Shoe Museum and the Japan Foundation.

“We believe that the Bloor Street Culture Corridor will benefit the public, the neighbourhood, the arts and culture community, the tourism industry and the City of Toronto,” Kelly said.

Deputy Mayor Norm Kelly said the launch of the corridor marked another step in Toronto’s evolution into a top-notch destination.

“This is an exciting city to live in – not the city I was born into or raised, but it absolutely has become a world-class city,” he said.

The cultural corridor is working with the City, Tourism Toronto, the Bloor-Yorkville BIA, the Annex BIA and the Ontario Arts Council to boost its profile and increase the number of visits.

Councillor Michael Thompson, who chairs the city’s Economic Development and Culture Committee, said the BSCC was the type of idea that could be rolled out in other neighbourhoods that boast a wealth of cultural institutions, though he noted that Bloor Street between Bay and Bathurst is particularly rich in that way.

“The 12 organizations that comprise the corridor already attract some two million people to their facilities each year,” he said. “By rallying around a new collaborative cultural banner, the potential for mutual growth is extremely exciting for our community and our city.”

The launch was also attended by local councillors Adam Vaughan and Kristyn Wong-Tam. The BSCC is located in Vaughan’s ward, while Wong-Tam, a champion of the arts in Toronto, represents the area just east of the corridor.

Vaughan stressed that there is more to culture in the city than simply drawing attention to the institutions along Bloor.

“We have to make sure when we talk about culture, on Bloor Street, we also talk about the capacity to house artists,” he said.

Japan Foundation executive director Takashi Ishida said the BSCC would benefit all businesses along the stretch of Bloor and would help the 12 organizations who are part of the collaboration to build their client and patron bases.

“We can mutually help each other and each other’s patrons by (bridging) borders and sharing,” he said. “The interactions will enhance all our client bases.”

For more information on the BSCC, visit www.bloorstculturecorridor.com or www.facebook.com/bloorstculturecorridor, or follow @bloorstculture on Twitter.

Bloor Street is now a ‘culture corridor’

Dozen cultural institutions are all located within a mile of each other

News Apr 03, 2014 by Justin Skinner City Centre Mirror

A roughly one-mile stretch of Bloor Street housing a dozen unique arts and culture destinations has earned a new designation as the Bloor Street Culture Corridor (BSCC).

The length of road between Bathurst and Bay streets was branded as such at a special event on Wednesday, April 2 at L’Espresso Bar Mercurio. The new culture corridor includes a variety of museums, arts venues and institutions devoted to French, Italian, Japanese and Jewish culture.

“There’s this great ‘aha’ moment that happens and people’s eyes light up when we realize that there’s a dozen arts and cultural organizations all within a mile, or just over a kilometre and a half, right here on Bloor Street,” said Heather Kelly, who works with the Royal Conservatory of Music and who founded the idea of the cultural corridor.

“We can easily take the TTC to get here – there are five subway stops along the Bloor Street Culture Corridor – and walk from a museum to an afternoon art talk to an exhibition, do a bit of shopping, grab lunch or dinner and enjoy an inspiring concert or film all within just a few blocks.”

The corridor will see the 12 attractions working more closely to draw more patrons and highlight the offerings along the stretch of road. The organizations that are part of the collaboration are the Bloor Hot Docs Cinema, Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra and Choir, the Toronto Consort, the Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre, the Native Canadian Centre of Toronto, Alliance Francaise de Toronto, the Istitudo Italiano di Cultura, the Royal Conservatory of Music, the Royal Ontario Museum, the Gardiner Museum, the Bata Shoe Museum and the Japan Foundation.

“We believe that the Bloor Street Culture Corridor will benefit the public, the neighbourhood, the arts and culture community, the tourism industry and the City of Toronto,” Kelly said.

Deputy Mayor Norm Kelly said the launch of the corridor marked another step in Toronto’s evolution into a top-notch destination.

“This is an exciting city to live in – not the city I was born into or raised, but it absolutely has become a world-class city,” he said.

The cultural corridor is working with the City, Tourism Toronto, the Bloor-Yorkville BIA, the Annex BIA and the Ontario Arts Council to boost its profile and increase the number of visits.

Councillor Michael Thompson, who chairs the city’s Economic Development and Culture Committee, said the BSCC was the type of idea that could be rolled out in other neighbourhoods that boast a wealth of cultural institutions, though he noted that Bloor Street between Bay and Bathurst is particularly rich in that way.

“The 12 organizations that comprise the corridor already attract some two million people to their facilities each year,” he said. “By rallying around a new collaborative cultural banner, the potential for mutual growth is extremely exciting for our community and our city.”

The launch was also attended by local councillors Adam Vaughan and Kristyn Wong-Tam. The BSCC is located in Vaughan’s ward, while Wong-Tam, a champion of the arts in Toronto, represents the area just east of the corridor.

Vaughan stressed that there is more to culture in the city than simply drawing attention to the institutions along Bloor.

“We have to make sure when we talk about culture, on Bloor Street, we also talk about the capacity to house artists,” he said.

Japan Foundation executive director Takashi Ishida said the BSCC would benefit all businesses along the stretch of Bloor and would help the 12 organizations who are part of the collaboration to build their client and patron bases.

“We can mutually help each other and each other’s patrons by (bridging) borders and sharing,” he said. “The interactions will enhance all our client bases.”

For more information on the BSCC, visit www.bloorstculturecorridor.com or www.facebook.com/bloorstculturecorridor, or follow @bloorstculture on Twitter.