Monster homes will not take over Seven Oaks, local councillor says

News Mar 04, 2014 Scarborough Mirror

The character of the Seven Oaks neighbourhood will not be overwhelmed by an invasion of “monster homes,” Scarborough East Councillor Paul Ainslie has concluded.

The old Morningside Community zoning bylaw for the area, which is north of Ellesmere Road to Hwy. 401 between Morningside Avenue and Highland Creek, had no rules on building length or depth and no backyard setbacks except along the 401.

One bungalow owner on Edenmills Drive got a permit in 2012 to add a two-storey addition to the house, prompting concerns from neighbours that others could do the same.

Last fall, Ainslie asked city staff for a report on how Seven Oaks could be protected from “overbuilding.”

Received at a Scarborough Community Council meeting recently, the report found new restrictions in the city-wide Official Plan, even though that plan is under appeal at the Ontario Municipal Board, apply to building projects in Seven Oaks because “the more restrictive zoning standard prevails.”

Owners can still seek a minor variance at the Scarborough’s Committee of Adjustment or a zoning amendment at community council, but the public would have to be notified first.

“You’re not going to see any monster homes on these two streets” where residents were most concerned, Ainslie predicted after the meeting.

Monster homes will not take over Seven Oaks, local councillor says

Lack of rules in old bylaw had residents concerned

News Mar 04, 2014 Scarborough Mirror

The character of the Seven Oaks neighbourhood will not be overwhelmed by an invasion of “monster homes,” Scarborough East Councillor Paul Ainslie has concluded.

The old Morningside Community zoning bylaw for the area, which is north of Ellesmere Road to Hwy. 401 between Morningside Avenue and Highland Creek, had no rules on building length or depth and no backyard setbacks except along the 401.

One bungalow owner on Edenmills Drive got a permit in 2012 to add a two-storey addition to the house, prompting concerns from neighbours that others could do the same.

Last fall, Ainslie asked city staff for a report on how Seven Oaks could be protected from “overbuilding.”

Received at a Scarborough Community Council meeting recently, the report found new restrictions in the city-wide Official Plan, even though that plan is under appeal at the Ontario Municipal Board, apply to building projects in Seven Oaks because “the more restrictive zoning standard prevails.”

Owners can still seek a minor variance at the Scarborough’s Committee of Adjustment or a zoning amendment at community council, but the public would have to be notified first.

“You’re not going to see any monster homes on these two streets” where residents were most concerned, Ainslie predicted after the meeting.

Monster homes will not take over Seven Oaks, local councillor says

Lack of rules in old bylaw had residents concerned

News Mar 04, 2014 Scarborough Mirror

The character of the Seven Oaks neighbourhood will not be overwhelmed by an invasion of “monster homes,” Scarborough East Councillor Paul Ainslie has concluded.

The old Morningside Community zoning bylaw for the area, which is north of Ellesmere Road to Hwy. 401 between Morningside Avenue and Highland Creek, had no rules on building length or depth and no backyard setbacks except along the 401.

One bungalow owner on Edenmills Drive got a permit in 2012 to add a two-storey addition to the house, prompting concerns from neighbours that others could do the same.

Last fall, Ainslie asked city staff for a report on how Seven Oaks could be protected from “overbuilding.”

Received at a Scarborough Community Council meeting recently, the report found new restrictions in the city-wide Official Plan, even though that plan is under appeal at the Ontario Municipal Board, apply to building projects in Seven Oaks because “the more restrictive zoning standard prevails.”

Owners can still seek a minor variance at the Scarborough’s Committee of Adjustment or a zoning amendment at community council, but the public would have to be notified first.

“You’re not going to see any monster homes on these two streets” where residents were most concerned, Ainslie predicted after the meeting.