Concern over length of time agreement on Guild Inn taking

News Feb 10, 2014 by Mike Adler Scarborough Mirror

Scarborough East Councillor Paul Ainslie said he’s worried but still hopeful a deal will soon be signed by the City of Toronto to revive the derelict Guild Inn in his ward.

“I knock on wood every day,” said Ainslie, who like other residents has seen two prospective city partnerships with third parties come to nothing since the city closed the historic former Inn in 2001.

In the eight months since city council accepted a proposal last June from a company willing to build and operate a restaurant and banquet hall at the Inn, reports on negotiations have been delayed several times.

Dynamic Hospitality and Entertainment Group was the only company which pre-qualified to make a bid. A longterm agreement with Dynamic would need to be approved by council, the Toronto Preservation Board and Toronto and Region Conservation Authority, which owns the land in Guild Park.

Ainslie said he’s been told there were “some legal issues or hurdles” the city was trying to work out, and a report on negotiations could come to council’s government management committee on Feb. 24.

The Inn, also known as the Bickford Residence, has been heavily damaged by the elements and flooding, and the condition of the boarded-up Guildwood landmark has held up city improvements to the park’s “cultural precincts” which are worth millions.

Ainslie said $4.2 million for these cultural investments in the park, which was home to an artist’s colony and still displays sculptures and the remnants of old Toronto buildings, is still on track.

And despite desires not to build or beautify areas around the damaged Inn, Ainslie said he has told city staff he wants the projects to start this year, adding “we’re going to have to tear that building down” if Dynamic’s proposal falls through.

The councillor and many residents also hope to see the Toronto Public Library’s Guildwood branch rebuilt in the park.

Plans for the cultural precincts were last updated in 2009, and the volunteer group Friends of Guild Park and Gardens has compiled ideas (releasing a summary last June) for revitalizing the park and the Inn.

The public should be kept involved in the process, said the group’s president John Mason, adding last month there is concern among Guildwood residents because no one has seen Dynamic’s proposal and negotiations on an agreement are taking longer than expected.

Concern over length of time agreement on Guild Inn taking

City committee to hear update on negotiations with Dynamic Hospitality later this month

News Feb 10, 2014 by Mike Adler Scarborough Mirror

Scarborough East Councillor Paul Ainslie said he’s worried but still hopeful a deal will soon be signed by the City of Toronto to revive the derelict Guild Inn in his ward.

“I knock on wood every day,” said Ainslie, who like other residents has seen two prospective city partnerships with third parties come to nothing since the city closed the historic former Inn in 2001.

In the eight months since city council accepted a proposal last June from a company willing to build and operate a restaurant and banquet hall at the Inn, reports on negotiations have been delayed several times.

Dynamic Hospitality and Entertainment Group was the only company which pre-qualified to make a bid. A longterm agreement with Dynamic would need to be approved by council, the Toronto Preservation Board and Toronto and Region Conservation Authority, which owns the land in Guild Park.

Ainslie said he’s been told there were “some legal issues or hurdles” the city was trying to work out, and a report on negotiations could come to council’s government management committee on Feb. 24.

The Inn, also known as the Bickford Residence, has been heavily damaged by the elements and flooding, and the condition of the boarded-up Guildwood landmark has held up city improvements to the park’s “cultural precincts” which are worth millions.

Ainslie said $4.2 million for these cultural investments in the park, which was home to an artist’s colony and still displays sculptures and the remnants of old Toronto buildings, is still on track.

And despite desires not to build or beautify areas around the damaged Inn, Ainslie said he has told city staff he wants the projects to start this year, adding “we’re going to have to tear that building down” if Dynamic’s proposal falls through.

The councillor and many residents also hope to see the Toronto Public Library’s Guildwood branch rebuilt in the park.

Plans for the cultural precincts were last updated in 2009, and the volunteer group Friends of Guild Park and Gardens has compiled ideas (releasing a summary last June) for revitalizing the park and the Inn.

The public should be kept involved in the process, said the group’s president John Mason, adding last month there is concern among Guildwood residents because no one has seen Dynamic’s proposal and negotiations on an agreement are taking longer than expected.

Concern over length of time agreement on Guild Inn taking

City committee to hear update on negotiations with Dynamic Hospitality later this month

News Feb 10, 2014 by Mike Adler Scarborough Mirror

Scarborough East Councillor Paul Ainslie said he’s worried but still hopeful a deal will soon be signed by the City of Toronto to revive the derelict Guild Inn in his ward.

“I knock on wood every day,” said Ainslie, who like other residents has seen two prospective city partnerships with third parties come to nothing since the city closed the historic former Inn in 2001.

In the eight months since city council accepted a proposal last June from a company willing to build and operate a restaurant and banquet hall at the Inn, reports on negotiations have been delayed several times.

Dynamic Hospitality and Entertainment Group was the only company which pre-qualified to make a bid. A longterm agreement with Dynamic would need to be approved by council, the Toronto Preservation Board and Toronto and Region Conservation Authority, which owns the land in Guild Park.

Ainslie said he’s been told there were “some legal issues or hurdles” the city was trying to work out, and a report on negotiations could come to council’s government management committee on Feb. 24.

The Inn, also known as the Bickford Residence, has been heavily damaged by the elements and flooding, and the condition of the boarded-up Guildwood landmark has held up city improvements to the park’s “cultural precincts” which are worth millions.

Ainslie said $4.2 million for these cultural investments in the park, which was home to an artist’s colony and still displays sculptures and the remnants of old Toronto buildings, is still on track.

And despite desires not to build or beautify areas around the damaged Inn, Ainslie said he has told city staff he wants the projects to start this year, adding “we’re going to have to tear that building down” if Dynamic’s proposal falls through.

The councillor and many residents also hope to see the Toronto Public Library’s Guildwood branch rebuilt in the park.

Plans for the cultural precincts were last updated in 2009, and the volunteer group Friends of Guild Park and Gardens has compiled ideas (releasing a summary last June) for revitalizing the park and the Inn.

The public should be kept involved in the process, said the group’s president John Mason, adding last month there is concern among Guildwood residents because no one has seen Dynamic’s proposal and negotiations on an agreement are taking longer than expected.