Photographer’s childhood dream comes true with exhibit at the Gladstone Hotel

News Jan 17, 2014 by Lisa Rainford Bloor West Villager

Fascinated by her father’s camera as a child, a lifelong dream for artist Ali Eisner has come true at the age of 40 as she is in the midst of exhibiting her photography.

The puppeteer, writer, composer, singer-songwriter and director of children’s television presents an exhibition of her photographs, ‘Favourite Things,’ at the Gladstone Hotel’s Art Bar until Jan. 19.

“I’ve always taken snaps. I’ve always been a photographer, but it was something I always did for myself,” Eisner told The Villager after her well-received show’s opening weekend. “My dad was into photography and I’d play with his camera. I was attracted to looking through the lens.”

The Bloor Street West and Dovercourt Road-area resident would go on to take photography in school, however, found herself in a career on TV, first as a children’s television host and then as a puppeteer. She is likely most known as the creator, operator and voice of Kids’ CBC’s talking yam puppet, Mamma Yamma, a role Eisner played for six years.

“Throughout my TV career, I ended up in weird scenarios. One minute, you’re making sandwiches and the next day, you’re on stage with a famous musician. I brought my camera with me on my TV adventures or when I’d travel, I’d bring my camera along. I’d go off on my own and have the camera with me,” Eisner said. “When I decided to leave Kids’ CBC, I told myself I’d do everything I always wanted to do. I always wanted to have a show.”

The Gladstone Hotel welcomed her instantly, she said. Debuting Thursday, Jan. 9, Eisner said it was “really wild.”

“It was so exciting to do something so different,” she said. “It was really cool. I got a lot of support. It was rad.”

Eisner describes 2013 as an “epic year of change” for her. This was the launching pad for her show, Favourite Things. She chose snapshots of her favourite moments over the last few years.

“People know the puppet, but they don’t know me. I’m proud of the stuff I’ve done. I picked photographs of my favourite moments,” she said.

Eisner said she enjoyed getting viewers’ feedback as they were looking at her images.

She’ll continue showing her photographs in future exhibits, Eisner said, just as she’ll continue on TV. She was a natural puppeteer as early as a child. As her mother read stories to Eisner and her sister, Eisner would want to make the pictures talk.

“I was always trying to make things talk: characters, objects,” she said. “My first puppet was an Ernie puppet.”

If you would like further details about Eisner, visit her website at alieisner.com

Photographer’s childhood dream comes true with exhibit at the Gladstone Hotel

Ali Eisner’s show on until Jan. 19

News Jan 17, 2014 by Lisa Rainford Bloor West Villager

Fascinated by her father’s camera as a child, a lifelong dream for artist Ali Eisner has come true at the age of 40 as she is in the midst of exhibiting her photography.

The puppeteer, writer, composer, singer-songwriter and director of children’s television presents an exhibition of her photographs, ‘Favourite Things,’ at the Gladstone Hotel’s Art Bar until Jan. 19.

“I’ve always taken snaps. I’ve always been a photographer, but it was something I always did for myself,” Eisner told The Villager after her well-received show’s opening weekend. “My dad was into photography and I’d play with his camera. I was attracted to looking through the lens.”

The Bloor Street West and Dovercourt Road-area resident would go on to take photography in school, however, found herself in a career on TV, first as a children’s television host and then as a puppeteer. She is likely most known as the creator, operator and voice of Kids’ CBC’s talking yam puppet, Mamma Yamma, a role Eisner played for six years.

“Throughout my TV career, I ended up in weird scenarios. One minute, you’re making sandwiches and the next day, you’re on stage with a famous musician. I brought my camera with me on my TV adventures or when I’d travel, I’d bring my camera along. I’d go off on my own and have the camera with me,” Eisner said. “When I decided to leave Kids’ CBC, I told myself I’d do everything I always wanted to do. I always wanted to have a show.”

The Gladstone Hotel welcomed her instantly, she said. Debuting Thursday, Jan. 9, Eisner said it was “really wild.”

“It was so exciting to do something so different,” she said. “It was really cool. I got a lot of support. It was rad.”

Eisner describes 2013 as an “epic year of change” for her. This was the launching pad for her show, Favourite Things. She chose snapshots of her favourite moments over the last few years.

“People know the puppet, but they don’t know me. I’m proud of the stuff I’ve done. I picked photographs of my favourite moments,” she said.

Eisner said she enjoyed getting viewers’ feedback as they were looking at her images.

She’ll continue showing her photographs in future exhibits, Eisner said, just as she’ll continue on TV. She was a natural puppeteer as early as a child. As her mother read stories to Eisner and her sister, Eisner would want to make the pictures talk.

“I was always trying to make things talk: characters, objects,” she said. “My first puppet was an Ernie puppet.”

If you would like further details about Eisner, visit her website at alieisner.com

Photographer’s childhood dream comes true with exhibit at the Gladstone Hotel

Ali Eisner’s show on until Jan. 19

News Jan 17, 2014 by Lisa Rainford Bloor West Villager

Fascinated by her father’s camera as a child, a lifelong dream for artist Ali Eisner has come true at the age of 40 as she is in the midst of exhibiting her photography.

The puppeteer, writer, composer, singer-songwriter and director of children’s television presents an exhibition of her photographs, ‘Favourite Things,’ at the Gladstone Hotel’s Art Bar until Jan. 19.

“I’ve always taken snaps. I’ve always been a photographer, but it was something I always did for myself,” Eisner told The Villager after her well-received show’s opening weekend. “My dad was into photography and I’d play with his camera. I was attracted to looking through the lens.”

The Bloor Street West and Dovercourt Road-area resident would go on to take photography in school, however, found herself in a career on TV, first as a children’s television host and then as a puppeteer. She is likely most known as the creator, operator and voice of Kids’ CBC’s talking yam puppet, Mamma Yamma, a role Eisner played for six years.

“Throughout my TV career, I ended up in weird scenarios. One minute, you’re making sandwiches and the next day, you’re on stage with a famous musician. I brought my camera with me on my TV adventures or when I’d travel, I’d bring my camera along. I’d go off on my own and have the camera with me,” Eisner said. “When I decided to leave Kids’ CBC, I told myself I’d do everything I always wanted to do. I always wanted to have a show.”

The Gladstone Hotel welcomed her instantly, she said. Debuting Thursday, Jan. 9, Eisner said it was “really wild.”

“It was so exciting to do something so different,” she said. “It was really cool. I got a lot of support. It was rad.”

Eisner describes 2013 as an “epic year of change” for her. This was the launching pad for her show, Favourite Things. She chose snapshots of her favourite moments over the last few years.

“People know the puppet, but they don’t know me. I’m proud of the stuff I’ve done. I picked photographs of my favourite moments,” she said.

Eisner said she enjoyed getting viewers’ feedback as they were looking at her images.

She’ll continue showing her photographs in future exhibits, Eisner said, just as she’ll continue on TV. She was a natural puppeteer as early as a child. As her mother read stories to Eisner and her sister, Eisner would want to make the pictures talk.

“I was always trying to make things talk: characters, objects,” she said. “My first puppet was an Ernie puppet.”

If you would like further details about Eisner, visit her website at alieisner.com