Junction Commons Project receives Trillium grant to help transform former 11 Division building

News Nov 11, 2013 by Lisa Rainford Bloor West Villager

A task force of local residents whose mission is to transform the former 11 Division police station into a community hub, received a $56,000 cash injection from the Ontario Trillium Foundation.

The funds will help the Junction Commons Project pay for a feasibility study, already underway, said member Lynn Bishop at an event this month to announce the grant.

The announcement brought together members of the project, local residents, partner Silver Circle – West Toronto Services for Seniors and local politicians from all levels of government, including Parkdale-High Park Sarah Doucette, MPP Cheri DiNovo and MP Peggy Nash as well as Davenport MPP Jonah Schein.

“I’m looking forward to the grand opening of this new community hub in September of 2015, four years after the police vacated the building,” Doucette said on Friday, Nov. 8. “I’ve been very impressed with the outreach to the community and (the Junction Commons Project’s) wonderful vision.”

DiNovo said she was “delighted” to have been able to help secure the Trillium grant.

In 2011, 11 Division moved from 209 Mavety St. to new digs on Davenport Road. Last year, a group of residents seized the opportunity to speak to the local community about its needs and interests for a community space. The goal is to create a “sustainable, community-based, inclusive space for Junction residents to gather” in the two-storey, 25,000 square-foot building that is approximately 60 years old. The Junction Commons Project, said Bishop, would not have been possible without the city’s support, which included keeping the building from being sold. She also credited community partner, the West Toronto Senior Services.

“The partnership with the West Toronto Seniors Services made it all possible because they have charitable status,” Bishop explained.

Area resident Peter Thoma, of urban Metrics Inc., will lead the feasibility study. As part of the study, he and the Junction Commons Project has been hosting a series of public charrettes to gather input. The first one was held at Annette library on Nov. 7. Out of that brainstorming session, several ideas surfaced, including a tool library, community kitchen, inter-generational workshops and volunteer opportunities, Bishop said.

Nash applauded the Junction Commons Project for engaging the community.

“What this shows is, a group of engaged community members who really know what’s best for their community. It’s people who care about their neighbourhood,” Nash said. “This is another step along the way in the evolution of the Junction.”

A project like this, said Schein, makes him feel “hopeful”.

“This is exciting to me. We need more public spaces that are accessible and affordable,” he said.

As of Friday, as many as 200 people had filled out an online survey about what they would like to see in a community hub.

For further details, visit junctioncommons.wordpress.com/tag/junction-commons-project

Junction Commons Project receives Trillium grant to help transform former 11 Division building

News Nov 11, 2013 by Lisa Rainford Bloor West Villager

A task force of local residents whose mission is to transform the former 11 Division police station into a community hub, received a $56,000 cash injection from the Ontario Trillium Foundation.

The funds will help the Junction Commons Project pay for a feasibility study, already underway, said member Lynn Bishop at an event this month to announce the grant.

The announcement brought together members of the project, local residents, partner Silver Circle – West Toronto Services for Seniors and local politicians from all levels of government, including Parkdale-High Park Sarah Doucette, MPP Cheri DiNovo and MP Peggy Nash as well as Davenport MPP Jonah Schein.

“I’m looking forward to the grand opening of this new community hub in September of 2015, four years after the police vacated the building,” Doucette said on Friday, Nov. 8. “I’ve been very impressed with the outreach to the community and (the Junction Commons Project’s) wonderful vision.”

DiNovo said she was “delighted” to have been able to help secure the Trillium grant.

In 2011, 11 Division moved from 209 Mavety St. to new digs on Davenport Road. Last year, a group of residents seized the opportunity to speak to the local community about its needs and interests for a community space. The goal is to create a “sustainable, community-based, inclusive space for Junction residents to gather” in the two-storey, 25,000 square-foot building that is approximately 60 years old. The Junction Commons Project, said Bishop, would not have been possible without the city’s support, which included keeping the building from being sold. She also credited community partner, the West Toronto Senior Services.

“The partnership with the West Toronto Seniors Services made it all possible because they have charitable status,” Bishop explained.

Area resident Peter Thoma, of urban Metrics Inc., will lead the feasibility study. As part of the study, he and the Junction Commons Project has been hosting a series of public charrettes to gather input. The first one was held at Annette library on Nov. 7. Out of that brainstorming session, several ideas surfaced, including a tool library, community kitchen, inter-generational workshops and volunteer opportunities, Bishop said.

Nash applauded the Junction Commons Project for engaging the community.

“What this shows is, a group of engaged community members who really know what’s best for their community. It’s people who care about their neighbourhood,” Nash said. “This is another step along the way in the evolution of the Junction.”

A project like this, said Schein, makes him feel “hopeful”.

“This is exciting to me. We need more public spaces that are accessible and affordable,” he said.

As of Friday, as many as 200 people had filled out an online survey about what they would like to see in a community hub.

For further details, visit junctioncommons.wordpress.com/tag/junction-commons-project

Junction Commons Project receives Trillium grant to help transform former 11 Division building

News Nov 11, 2013 by Lisa Rainford Bloor West Villager

A task force of local residents whose mission is to transform the former 11 Division police station into a community hub, received a $56,000 cash injection from the Ontario Trillium Foundation.

The funds will help the Junction Commons Project pay for a feasibility study, already underway, said member Lynn Bishop at an event this month to announce the grant.

The announcement brought together members of the project, local residents, partner Silver Circle – West Toronto Services for Seniors and local politicians from all levels of government, including Parkdale-High Park Sarah Doucette, MPP Cheri DiNovo and MP Peggy Nash as well as Davenport MPP Jonah Schein.

“I’m looking forward to the grand opening of this new community hub in September of 2015, four years after the police vacated the building,” Doucette said on Friday, Nov. 8. “I’ve been very impressed with the outreach to the community and (the Junction Commons Project’s) wonderful vision.”

DiNovo said she was “delighted” to have been able to help secure the Trillium grant.

In 2011, 11 Division moved from 209 Mavety St. to new digs on Davenport Road. Last year, a group of residents seized the opportunity to speak to the local community about its needs and interests for a community space. The goal is to create a “sustainable, community-based, inclusive space for Junction residents to gather” in the two-storey, 25,000 square-foot building that is approximately 60 years old. The Junction Commons Project, said Bishop, would not have been possible without the city’s support, which included keeping the building from being sold. She also credited community partner, the West Toronto Senior Services.

“The partnership with the West Toronto Seniors Services made it all possible because they have charitable status,” Bishop explained.

Area resident Peter Thoma, of urban Metrics Inc., will lead the feasibility study. As part of the study, he and the Junction Commons Project has been hosting a series of public charrettes to gather input. The first one was held at Annette library on Nov. 7. Out of that brainstorming session, several ideas surfaced, including a tool library, community kitchen, inter-generational workshops and volunteer opportunities, Bishop said.

Nash applauded the Junction Commons Project for engaging the community.

“What this shows is, a group of engaged community members who really know what’s best for their community. It’s people who care about their neighbourhood,” Nash said. “This is another step along the way in the evolution of the Junction.”

A project like this, said Schein, makes him feel “hopeful”.

“This is exciting to me. We need more public spaces that are accessible and affordable,” he said.

As of Friday, as many as 200 people had filled out an online survey about what they would like to see in a community hub.

For further details, visit junctioncommons.wordpress.com/tag/junction-commons-project