Noted artist Marco Sassone showcases career’s work in his adopted Toronto home

News Nov 07, 2013 by Justin Skinner City Centre Mirror

From his days growing up in Italy through his time spent in California to his current life in Toronto, painter Marco Sassone’s art has covered a wide array of subjects.

His career in the arts will be recognized with a retrospective exhibit of his works, dubbed Sanctuary, at Berenson Fine Art Gallery.

Sassone’s career spans a period of more than 40 years, and his fans include Sophia Lauren, Tina Turner, the late Ella Fitzgerald and the late Luciano Pavarotti.

He noted that showcasing such a long and prolific career in one show was a daunting task.

“It was a challenge selecting pieces to fill in all the gaps over 40 years but I think the gallery did a good job of it,” he said.

Sassone’s art was typically run in cycles, with various series placing a focus on new subject matter every few years.

During his time in California, for instance, he focused on urban landscapes for years before shifting his gaze to the plight of the homeless in the early 1990s. In Toronto, his railroad track series offers perspectives on various underpasses and railways in the city he now calls home.

“The tracks symbolize departures and arrivals and the struggle that every immigrant goes through,” he said. “It’s also a good look at Toronto with urban landscapes and lots of converging lines that look at Canadian culture, since the tracks connect people and were used to carry lumber and transport other goods.”

The pieces are all focused on tracks found right in the middle of the city. The painter, who now lives near Bloor and Jarvis streets, has also spent some of his time in the city painting urban cityscapes.

“I’m working on a series of watercolours which works well for me now because it’s a little less demanding,” he said. “I cover the entire surface of the paper because it’s a lot of night scenes – Sherbourne at night, Bloor Street at night,” he said.

Sassone is perhaps best-known for his homeless series, which he painted from 1990 to 1994 while living in San Francisco.

“There, you would see many people who were close to everybody living on the streets – they knew them,” he said. “In Toronto, it’s much more organized. You see (the homeless) in a few corners of the city but in San Francisco at the time, there were no programs to help these people or get them into shelters.”

Sassone has lived in Toronto since 2005, when he moved here at the urging of his wife. While most of his life has been marked by long-distance moves, he plans on staying in the city for the foreseeable future.

“The departures and arrivals you see in the railroad tracks (series) is like my life, almost – as soon as I start feeling comfortable in a city, I feel almost like I have to leave,” he said. “But I’m happy here, especially for work, because I’m always discovering lots of new material to paint.”

Sanctuary will run at Berenson Fine Art Gallery, 212 Avenue Road, from Thursday, Nov. 7 through Thursday, Dec. 12 with an opening gala scheduled on the first night.

Noted artist Marco Sassone showcases career’s work in his adopted Toronto home

Retrospective runs Nov. 7 to Dec. 12 at Berenson Fine Art Gallery

News Nov 07, 2013 by Justin Skinner City Centre Mirror

From his days growing up in Italy through his time spent in California to his current life in Toronto, painter Marco Sassone’s art has covered a wide array of subjects.

His career in the arts will be recognized with a retrospective exhibit of his works, dubbed Sanctuary, at Berenson Fine Art Gallery.

Sassone’s career spans a period of more than 40 years, and his fans include Sophia Lauren, Tina Turner, the late Ella Fitzgerald and the late Luciano Pavarotti.

He noted that showcasing such a long and prolific career in one show was a daunting task.

“It was a challenge selecting pieces to fill in all the gaps over 40 years but I think the gallery did a good job of it,” he said.

Sassone’s art was typically run in cycles, with various series placing a focus on new subject matter every few years.

During his time in California, for instance, he focused on urban landscapes for years before shifting his gaze to the plight of the homeless in the early 1990s. In Toronto, his railroad track series offers perspectives on various underpasses and railways in the city he now calls home.

“The tracks symbolize departures and arrivals and the struggle that every immigrant goes through,” he said. “It’s also a good look at Toronto with urban landscapes and lots of converging lines that look at Canadian culture, since the tracks connect people and were used to carry lumber and transport other goods.”

The pieces are all focused on tracks found right in the middle of the city. The painter, who now lives near Bloor and Jarvis streets, has also spent some of his time in the city painting urban cityscapes.

“I’m working on a series of watercolours which works well for me now because it’s a little less demanding,” he said. “I cover the entire surface of the paper because it’s a lot of night scenes – Sherbourne at night, Bloor Street at night,” he said.

Sassone is perhaps best-known for his homeless series, which he painted from 1990 to 1994 while living in San Francisco.

“There, you would see many people who were close to everybody living on the streets – they knew them,” he said. “In Toronto, it’s much more organized. You see (the homeless) in a few corners of the city but in San Francisco at the time, there were no programs to help these people or get them into shelters.”

Sassone has lived in Toronto since 2005, when he moved here at the urging of his wife. While most of his life has been marked by long-distance moves, he plans on staying in the city for the foreseeable future.

“The departures and arrivals you see in the railroad tracks (series) is like my life, almost – as soon as I start feeling comfortable in a city, I feel almost like I have to leave,” he said. “But I’m happy here, especially for work, because I’m always discovering lots of new material to paint.”

Sanctuary will run at Berenson Fine Art Gallery, 212 Avenue Road, from Thursday, Nov. 7 through Thursday, Dec. 12 with an opening gala scheduled on the first night.

Noted artist Marco Sassone showcases career’s work in his adopted Toronto home

Retrospective runs Nov. 7 to Dec. 12 at Berenson Fine Art Gallery

News Nov 07, 2013 by Justin Skinner City Centre Mirror

From his days growing up in Italy through his time spent in California to his current life in Toronto, painter Marco Sassone’s art has covered a wide array of subjects.

His career in the arts will be recognized with a retrospective exhibit of his works, dubbed Sanctuary, at Berenson Fine Art Gallery.

Sassone’s career spans a period of more than 40 years, and his fans include Sophia Lauren, Tina Turner, the late Ella Fitzgerald and the late Luciano Pavarotti.

He noted that showcasing such a long and prolific career in one show was a daunting task.

“It was a challenge selecting pieces to fill in all the gaps over 40 years but I think the gallery did a good job of it,” he said.

Sassone’s art was typically run in cycles, with various series placing a focus on new subject matter every few years.

During his time in California, for instance, he focused on urban landscapes for years before shifting his gaze to the plight of the homeless in the early 1990s. In Toronto, his railroad track series offers perspectives on various underpasses and railways in the city he now calls home.

“The tracks symbolize departures and arrivals and the struggle that every immigrant goes through,” he said. “It’s also a good look at Toronto with urban landscapes and lots of converging lines that look at Canadian culture, since the tracks connect people and were used to carry lumber and transport other goods.”

The pieces are all focused on tracks found right in the middle of the city. The painter, who now lives near Bloor and Jarvis streets, has also spent some of his time in the city painting urban cityscapes.

“I’m working on a series of watercolours which works well for me now because it’s a little less demanding,” he said. “I cover the entire surface of the paper because it’s a lot of night scenes – Sherbourne at night, Bloor Street at night,” he said.

Sassone is perhaps best-known for his homeless series, which he painted from 1990 to 1994 while living in San Francisco.

“There, you would see many people who were close to everybody living on the streets – they knew them,” he said. “In Toronto, it’s much more organized. You see (the homeless) in a few corners of the city but in San Francisco at the time, there were no programs to help these people or get them into shelters.”

Sassone has lived in Toronto since 2005, when he moved here at the urging of his wife. While most of his life has been marked by long-distance moves, he plans on staying in the city for the foreseeable future.

“The departures and arrivals you see in the railroad tracks (series) is like my life, almost – as soon as I start feeling comfortable in a city, I feel almost like I have to leave,” he said. “But I’m happy here, especially for work, because I’m always discovering lots of new material to paint.”

Sanctuary will run at Berenson Fine Art Gallery, 212 Avenue Road, from Thursday, Nov. 7 through Thursday, Dec. 12 with an opening gala scheduled on the first night.