Ainslie calls Mayor Ford a ‘bully and a liar’ over robocalls

News Oct 15, 2013 by David Nickle Scarborough Mirror

Mayor Rob Ford’s robocalls to residents of Ward 43 to talk about local councillor Paul Ainslie’s vote on the Scarborough subway were the acts of “a bully and a liar” according to the councillor.

But Ford said making those calls was simply “leadership,” and dismissed Ainslie’s complaints as “ridiculous.”

“This is ridiculous — I don’t know what he’s hiding from,” said Ford Tuesday, Oct. 15, afternoon, following Ainslie’s statement.

“I just told people how he voted. That’s it! There’s no more, no less. I didn’t get personal.”

Ford paid “a couple of hundred dollars” for the robocalls, which went out hours after Ainslie had resigned from Ford’s executive committee following the vote to raise property taxes and go ahead with a $3.2 billion subway to replace the Scarborough Rapid Transit line.

Ainslie had moved a motion to scrap the subway last week, and Ford called him out on it on the floor of council, demanding to know why he was voting against the will of Scarborough residents and suggesting he’d pay for it in the next election.

Ainslie said he would be contacting the city’s integrity commissioner to lodge a formal complaint.

“I’m here to start the fight back against a bully and a liar,” said Ainslie in a prepared statement he read to reporters in council’s member’s lounge Tuesday morning.

“I’m here to say enough is enough with this Mayor who thinks he can get away with anything by twisting the truth, saying just some of the truth or not telling it straight at all. For those who will shrug and say ‘Well that’s just politics’ I say they’re dead wrong and just lying to themselves.”

Ainslie’s constituents began receiving calls with a recorded voice claiming to be Rob Ford and criticizing Ainslie’s vote and accusing him of “leading the charge” against subways in Scarborough.

Ainslie said that accusation is inaccurate.

“I didn’t as he says lead a charge against subways in Scarborough; what I did was lead a charge against a tax hike and no financial clarity,” said Ainslie, who had argued that the $3.2 billion subway extension would require more than a billion dollars from city coffers, putting the city deeper into debt and requiring unaffordable tax increases for residents.

“It’s the mayor who caved, not me,” said Ainslie.

“It’s the mayor who is now doing what he always does when he doesn’t want to be caught out or be truthful; he’s just using his bully pulpit to find a scapegoat for his own failings here at council or out on the street.”

Ainslie said that he had supported Ford’s agenda earlier in the term, and had supported the subway as recently as July, but when it became clear to him how much of a financial risk the subway was going to be, he backed away.

“The subway and whether it is needed has never been an issue,” he said. “How it will be funded is. I’ve always resisted new taxes for an overtaxed city – and that was the appeal of the agenda many people supported in electing Mayor Ford in the last election. Tossing that position aside is just cynical politics – which is a fun game when you don’t have to pay the bills.”

Ainslie said that when he resigned from the executive committee, Mayor Ford “looked me in the eye and said he respected me and looked forward to us being friends for a long time to come.

“Just three short hours later he carpet-bombed Scarborough residents with a robocall telling them I’d voted against subways. He went on CFRB with his brother on the weekend and, unopposed, ranted over my position and said all he was doing was letting constituents know my voting record,” said Ainslie.

“We all know here what it was: a blatant act of political thuggery the type of which has never been witnessed before: robocalls using the mayor’s phone number and his own voice.”

Ainslie went on to say that “American-style assassin politics has no place in this city, let alone this country, and the mayor has crossed the line.”

Ford’s brother Councillor Doug Ford scoffed at Ainslie’s accusations and suggested Ainslie was simply angry because he had been passed over for budget chief earlier this year.

“I guess this is a way of Councillor Ainslie changing the channel to distract the people of his ward from the issue,” said Ford.

“The issue is the 70 per cent of the people in his ward that he’s letting down. This is not about Paul Ainslie—this is about subways.”

Trinity-Spadina Councillor Adam Vaughan, meanwhile, said he understood Ainslie’s outrage, but he said that the councillor shouldn’t lose any sleep about having Ford target him.

“The mayor’s entitled to talk to his constituents,” said Vaughan. “When I send out an email saying I’ll stop Ford’s cuts to the library — it’s the same thing, it’s politics. But first of all, nobody listens to him anymore. So who cares how many people he calls? And I wish he’d do it in my ward — it’d guarantee my re-election.”

Ainslie calls Mayor Ford a ‘bully and a liar’ over robocalls

Mayor calls Scarborough councillor’s comments ‘ridiculous’

News Oct 15, 2013 by David Nickle Scarborough Mirror

Mayor Rob Ford’s robocalls to residents of Ward 43 to talk about local councillor Paul Ainslie’s vote on the Scarborough subway were the acts of “a bully and a liar” according to the councillor.

But Ford said making those calls was simply “leadership,” and dismissed Ainslie’s complaints as “ridiculous.”

“This is ridiculous — I don’t know what he’s hiding from,” said Ford Tuesday, Oct. 15, afternoon, following Ainslie’s statement.

“I just told people how he voted. That’s it! There’s no more, no less. I didn’t get personal.”

Ford paid “a couple of hundred dollars” for the robocalls, which went out hours after Ainslie had resigned from Ford’s executive committee following the vote to raise property taxes and go ahead with a $3.2 billion subway to replace the Scarborough Rapid Transit line.

Ainslie had moved a motion to scrap the subway last week, and Ford called him out on it on the floor of council, demanding to know why he was voting against the will of Scarborough residents and suggesting he’d pay for it in the next election.

Ainslie said he would be contacting the city’s integrity commissioner to lodge a formal complaint.

“I’m here to start the fight back against a bully and a liar,” said Ainslie in a prepared statement he read to reporters in council’s member’s lounge Tuesday morning.

“I’m here to say enough is enough with this Mayor who thinks he can get away with anything by twisting the truth, saying just some of the truth or not telling it straight at all. For those who will shrug and say ‘Well that’s just politics’ I say they’re dead wrong and just lying to themselves.”

Ainslie’s constituents began receiving calls with a recorded voice claiming to be Rob Ford and criticizing Ainslie’s vote and accusing him of “leading the charge” against subways in Scarborough.

Ainslie said that accusation is inaccurate.

“I didn’t as he says lead a charge against subways in Scarborough; what I did was lead a charge against a tax hike and no financial clarity,” said Ainslie, who had argued that the $3.2 billion subway extension would require more than a billion dollars from city coffers, putting the city deeper into debt and requiring unaffordable tax increases for residents.

“It’s the mayor who caved, not me,” said Ainslie.

“It’s the mayor who is now doing what he always does when he doesn’t want to be caught out or be truthful; he’s just using his bully pulpit to find a scapegoat for his own failings here at council or out on the street.”

Ainslie said that he had supported Ford’s agenda earlier in the term, and had supported the subway as recently as July, but when it became clear to him how much of a financial risk the subway was going to be, he backed away.

“The subway and whether it is needed has never been an issue,” he said. “How it will be funded is. I’ve always resisted new taxes for an overtaxed city – and that was the appeal of the agenda many people supported in electing Mayor Ford in the last election. Tossing that position aside is just cynical politics – which is a fun game when you don’t have to pay the bills.”

Ainslie said that when he resigned from the executive committee, Mayor Ford “looked me in the eye and said he respected me and looked forward to us being friends for a long time to come.

“Just three short hours later he carpet-bombed Scarborough residents with a robocall telling them I’d voted against subways. He went on CFRB with his brother on the weekend and, unopposed, ranted over my position and said all he was doing was letting constituents know my voting record,” said Ainslie.

“We all know here what it was: a blatant act of political thuggery the type of which has never been witnessed before: robocalls using the mayor’s phone number and his own voice.”

Ainslie went on to say that “American-style assassin politics has no place in this city, let alone this country, and the mayor has crossed the line.”

Ford’s brother Councillor Doug Ford scoffed at Ainslie’s accusations and suggested Ainslie was simply angry because he had been passed over for budget chief earlier this year.

“I guess this is a way of Councillor Ainslie changing the channel to distract the people of his ward from the issue,” said Ford.

“The issue is the 70 per cent of the people in his ward that he’s letting down. This is not about Paul Ainslie—this is about subways.”

Trinity-Spadina Councillor Adam Vaughan, meanwhile, said he understood Ainslie’s outrage, but he said that the councillor shouldn’t lose any sleep about having Ford target him.

“The mayor’s entitled to talk to his constituents,” said Vaughan. “When I send out an email saying I’ll stop Ford’s cuts to the library — it’s the same thing, it’s politics. But first of all, nobody listens to him anymore. So who cares how many people he calls? And I wish he’d do it in my ward — it’d guarantee my re-election.”

Ainslie calls Mayor Ford a ‘bully and a liar’ over robocalls

Mayor calls Scarborough councillor’s comments ‘ridiculous’

News Oct 15, 2013 by David Nickle Scarborough Mirror

Mayor Rob Ford’s robocalls to residents of Ward 43 to talk about local councillor Paul Ainslie’s vote on the Scarborough subway were the acts of “a bully and a liar” according to the councillor.

But Ford said making those calls was simply “leadership,” and dismissed Ainslie’s complaints as “ridiculous.”

“This is ridiculous — I don’t know what he’s hiding from,” said Ford Tuesday, Oct. 15, afternoon, following Ainslie’s statement.

“I just told people how he voted. That’s it! There’s no more, no less. I didn’t get personal.”

Ford paid “a couple of hundred dollars” for the robocalls, which went out hours after Ainslie had resigned from Ford’s executive committee following the vote to raise property taxes and go ahead with a $3.2 billion subway to replace the Scarborough Rapid Transit line.

Ainslie had moved a motion to scrap the subway last week, and Ford called him out on it on the floor of council, demanding to know why he was voting against the will of Scarborough residents and suggesting he’d pay for it in the next election.

Ainslie said he would be contacting the city’s integrity commissioner to lodge a formal complaint.

“I’m here to start the fight back against a bully and a liar,” said Ainslie in a prepared statement he read to reporters in council’s member’s lounge Tuesday morning.

“I’m here to say enough is enough with this Mayor who thinks he can get away with anything by twisting the truth, saying just some of the truth or not telling it straight at all. For those who will shrug and say ‘Well that’s just politics’ I say they’re dead wrong and just lying to themselves.”

Ainslie’s constituents began receiving calls with a recorded voice claiming to be Rob Ford and criticizing Ainslie’s vote and accusing him of “leading the charge” against subways in Scarborough.

Ainslie said that accusation is inaccurate.

“I didn’t as he says lead a charge against subways in Scarborough; what I did was lead a charge against a tax hike and no financial clarity,” said Ainslie, who had argued that the $3.2 billion subway extension would require more than a billion dollars from city coffers, putting the city deeper into debt and requiring unaffordable tax increases for residents.

“It’s the mayor who caved, not me,” said Ainslie.

“It’s the mayor who is now doing what he always does when he doesn’t want to be caught out or be truthful; he’s just using his bully pulpit to find a scapegoat for his own failings here at council or out on the street.”

Ainslie said that he had supported Ford’s agenda earlier in the term, and had supported the subway as recently as July, but when it became clear to him how much of a financial risk the subway was going to be, he backed away.

“The subway and whether it is needed has never been an issue,” he said. “How it will be funded is. I’ve always resisted new taxes for an overtaxed city – and that was the appeal of the agenda many people supported in electing Mayor Ford in the last election. Tossing that position aside is just cynical politics – which is a fun game when you don’t have to pay the bills.”

Ainslie said that when he resigned from the executive committee, Mayor Ford “looked me in the eye and said he respected me and looked forward to us being friends for a long time to come.

“Just three short hours later he carpet-bombed Scarborough residents with a robocall telling them I’d voted against subways. He went on CFRB with his brother on the weekend and, unopposed, ranted over my position and said all he was doing was letting constituents know my voting record,” said Ainslie.

“We all know here what it was: a blatant act of political thuggery the type of which has never been witnessed before: robocalls using the mayor’s phone number and his own voice.”

Ainslie went on to say that “American-style assassin politics has no place in this city, let alone this country, and the mayor has crossed the line.”

Ford’s brother Councillor Doug Ford scoffed at Ainslie’s accusations and suggested Ainslie was simply angry because he had been passed over for budget chief earlier this year.

“I guess this is a way of Councillor Ainslie changing the channel to distract the people of his ward from the issue,” said Ford.

“The issue is the 70 per cent of the people in his ward that he’s letting down. This is not about Paul Ainslie—this is about subways.”

Trinity-Spadina Councillor Adam Vaughan, meanwhile, said he understood Ainslie’s outrage, but he said that the councillor shouldn’t lose any sleep about having Ford target him.

“The mayor’s entitled to talk to his constituents,” said Vaughan. “When I send out an email saying I’ll stop Ford’s cuts to the library — it’s the same thing, it’s politics. But first of all, nobody listens to him anymore. So who cares how many people he calls? And I wish he’d do it in my ward — it’d guarantee my re-election.”