OBITUARY: Anne Goodman built culture of peace at home and abroad

News Aug 14, 2013 by Clark Kim York Guardian

The memorial service for Anne Goodman held Monday afternoon saw hundreds come out to celebrate the life of a woman who left a legacy of social justice and community peace building.

Hundreds of paper cranes were individually made by family and friends and hung from the ceiling to honour the Oakwood-Eglinton-area resident who died at the age of 62 on Aug. 1 after a brief battle with cancer.

“Cranes are a symbol of peace,” said Vicki Adelson, one of Goodman’s three daughters. “We also made a lot of them when we were younger.”

She and her two sisters, Sandy Murray and Susie Adelson, knew their mother was all about community and doing things together.

It’s no surprise then many of the guests participated in the memorial service held at Toronto Botanical Garden by bringing in flowers grown from their own gardens. The guests were then asked to take someone else’s flower and plant it in their own garden.

“My mom would love all of this stuff,” Vicki said. “Doing crafts and working together is very reminiscent of my mom.”

Her friends and colleagues would agree as they recalled her natural ability to connect people with one another and how she emphasized the importance of relationships.

“She always brought that powerful commitment to her work,” said Ed O’Sullivan, professor emeritus at the University of Toronto, who worked with Goodman at the Tranformative Learning Centre at OISE.

During her time at OISE, she taught in the department of Adult Education and Community Development, directed a graduate certificate in Community Healing and Peacebuilding, and became the co-director of the Transformative Learning Centre.

Goodman continued her work at Interchange: International Institute for Community-Based Peacebuilding as president and co-founder of the organization, which consists of a diverse group of community-based peacebuilders around the world who collaborate on educational and research projects.

She travelled around the world from Uganda to Costa Rica to make all sorts of connections in building that culture of peace.

“She was always expanding the circle,” said her husband, Michael Wheeler, who worked alongside Goodman at Interchange.

Wheeler added Goodman was an example of compassion lived out loud.

“I’m not an easy person at times. But she brought out the best in me,” he said.

Goodman’s mother, Sonia, would say the same.

“She was such a caring daughter. She never had any nastiness in her. She was always, always true to herself,” Sonia said. “I’m very, very proud to say I’m Anne Goodman’s mother.”

Donations to InterChange can be made through the website at www.interchange4peace.org or www.CanadaHelps.org

In addition, contributions can be made to the Anne Goodman Tree Fund by sending an e-transfer to nathandavidgreene@gmail.com to help plant trees throughout Toronto parks in her memory.

OBITUARY: Anne Goodman built culture of peace at home and abroad

News Aug 14, 2013 by Clark Kim York Guardian

The memorial service for Anne Goodman held Monday afternoon saw hundreds come out to celebrate the life of a woman who left a legacy of social justice and community peace building.

Hundreds of paper cranes were individually made by family and friends and hung from the ceiling to honour the Oakwood-Eglinton-area resident who died at the age of 62 on Aug. 1 after a brief battle with cancer.

“Cranes are a symbol of peace,” said Vicki Adelson, one of Goodman’s three daughters. “We also made a lot of them when we were younger.”

She and her two sisters, Sandy Murray and Susie Adelson, knew their mother was all about community and doing things together.

It’s no surprise then many of the guests participated in the memorial service held at Toronto Botanical Garden by bringing in flowers grown from their own gardens. The guests were then asked to take someone else’s flower and plant it in their own garden.

“My mom would love all of this stuff,” Vicki said. “Doing crafts and working together is very reminiscent of my mom.”

Her friends and colleagues would agree as they recalled her natural ability to connect people with one another and how she emphasized the importance of relationships.

“She always brought that powerful commitment to her work,” said Ed O’Sullivan, professor emeritus at the University of Toronto, who worked with Goodman at the Tranformative Learning Centre at OISE.

During her time at OISE, she taught in the department of Adult Education and Community Development, directed a graduate certificate in Community Healing and Peacebuilding, and became the co-director of the Transformative Learning Centre.

Goodman continued her work at Interchange: International Institute for Community-Based Peacebuilding as president and co-founder of the organization, which consists of a diverse group of community-based peacebuilders around the world who collaborate on educational and research projects.

She travelled around the world from Uganda to Costa Rica to make all sorts of connections in building that culture of peace.

“She was always expanding the circle,” said her husband, Michael Wheeler, who worked alongside Goodman at Interchange.

Wheeler added Goodman was an example of compassion lived out loud.

“I’m not an easy person at times. But she brought out the best in me,” he said.

Goodman’s mother, Sonia, would say the same.

“She was such a caring daughter. She never had any nastiness in her. She was always, always true to herself,” Sonia said. “I’m very, very proud to say I’m Anne Goodman’s mother.”

Donations to InterChange can be made through the website at www.interchange4peace.org or www.CanadaHelps.org

In addition, contributions can be made to the Anne Goodman Tree Fund by sending an e-transfer to nathandavidgreene@gmail.com to help plant trees throughout Toronto parks in her memory.

OBITUARY: Anne Goodman built culture of peace at home and abroad

News Aug 14, 2013 by Clark Kim York Guardian

The memorial service for Anne Goodman held Monday afternoon saw hundreds come out to celebrate the life of a woman who left a legacy of social justice and community peace building.

Hundreds of paper cranes were individually made by family and friends and hung from the ceiling to honour the Oakwood-Eglinton-area resident who died at the age of 62 on Aug. 1 after a brief battle with cancer.

“Cranes are a symbol of peace,” said Vicki Adelson, one of Goodman’s three daughters. “We also made a lot of them when we were younger.”

She and her two sisters, Sandy Murray and Susie Adelson, knew their mother was all about community and doing things together.

It’s no surprise then many of the guests participated in the memorial service held at Toronto Botanical Garden by bringing in flowers grown from their own gardens. The guests were then asked to take someone else’s flower and plant it in their own garden.

“My mom would love all of this stuff,” Vicki said. “Doing crafts and working together is very reminiscent of my mom.”

Her friends and colleagues would agree as they recalled her natural ability to connect people with one another and how she emphasized the importance of relationships.

“She always brought that powerful commitment to her work,” said Ed O’Sullivan, professor emeritus at the University of Toronto, who worked with Goodman at the Tranformative Learning Centre at OISE.

During her time at OISE, she taught in the department of Adult Education and Community Development, directed a graduate certificate in Community Healing and Peacebuilding, and became the co-director of the Transformative Learning Centre.

Goodman continued her work at Interchange: International Institute for Community-Based Peacebuilding as president and co-founder of the organization, which consists of a diverse group of community-based peacebuilders around the world who collaborate on educational and research projects.

She travelled around the world from Uganda to Costa Rica to make all sorts of connections in building that culture of peace.

“She was always expanding the circle,” said her husband, Michael Wheeler, who worked alongside Goodman at Interchange.

Wheeler added Goodman was an example of compassion lived out loud.

“I’m not an easy person at times. But she brought out the best in me,” he said.

Goodman’s mother, Sonia, would say the same.

“She was such a caring daughter. She never had any nastiness in her. She was always, always true to herself,” Sonia said. “I’m very, very proud to say I’m Anne Goodman’s mother.”

Donations to InterChange can be made through the website at www.interchange4peace.org or www.CanadaHelps.org

In addition, contributions can be made to the Anne Goodman Tree Fund by sending an e-transfer to nathandavidgreene@gmail.com to help plant trees throughout Toronto parks in her memory.