New quilts offer 'shelter' from the storm

News Dec 02, 2008 Etobicoke Guardian

The women and children seeking protection at the North York Women's Shelter often arrive with nothing more than the clothes on their backs.

But they are sleeping more comfortably now, thanks to the caring hands of five women with Don Mills' Church of Our Saviour.

For the last year, Evelyn Bishop, Jill Monroe, Hazel Jones and Jenny Pasquill have been making 28 twin-sizes quilts for women and children living at the shelter while Cathy McIntyre has created 10 crib-sized baby quilts for the facility's tiniest residents.

"It was so easy, it was almost like this was laid on us," said Bishop, president of Church of Our Saviour's Anglican Church Women group.

"God wanted this done and He used us, because it all came together so easy."

Bishop, originally from Newfoundland, came up with the idea of a quilt drive after recalling a similar project back home.

She initially considered donating the quilts to the homeless but then saw a story on a television newscast featuring a women's shelter.

She pitched the idea to the other women, who embraced the project.

Bishop contacted shelter officials, who told her how many beds they needed quilts for and also explained how the residents could use sheets, pillow cases and toiletries.

The congregation responded enthusiastically to calls for supplies, bringing in fabric for the quilts, bedding, towels, mittens, purses, toothpaste, makeup, deodorant and other items.

"The response was overwhelming," said Bishop, adding organizers were determined their charitable efforts would involve donations and work rather than raising money.

"The thing just snowballed. It was such an overwhelming (response)."

Last Sunday, a representative from the shelter came to the church service to witness the quilts being dedicated before taking them back to the shelter to share with the residents.

The ceremony involved saying a prayer over the quilts and asking that they be used in God's service, according to Rev. Dennis Dolloff, the minister at the Church of Our Saviour.

"It is very exciting. It's a big celebration," he added.

The women met every Tuesday since last January to sew the fabric and Bishop would take the quilts home to finish them.

Knowing they were helping others made the project worthwhile.

"We wanted people to know there are people who care," Bishop said. "It was so uplifting."

The church is now working to buy Christmas presents for all the children staying at the shelter.

"We're going to put a gift under the tree for the children, something that can be theirs," Bishop said.

And next Tuesday, the church is donating bags of baby clothes, blankets and toiletries to Moorelands Baby Bundles, which provides basic baby supplies and clothing to new mothers living in poverty in Toronto.

New quilts offer 'shelter' from the storm

News Dec 02, 2008 Etobicoke Guardian

The women and children seeking protection at the North York Women's Shelter often arrive with nothing more than the clothes on their backs.

But they are sleeping more comfortably now, thanks to the caring hands of five women with Don Mills' Church of Our Saviour.

For the last year, Evelyn Bishop, Jill Monroe, Hazel Jones and Jenny Pasquill have been making 28 twin-sizes quilts for women and children living at the shelter while Cathy McIntyre has created 10 crib-sized baby quilts for the facility's tiniest residents.

"It was so easy, it was almost like this was laid on us," said Bishop, president of Church of Our Saviour's Anglican Church Women group.

"God wanted this done and He used us, because it all came together so easy."

Bishop, originally from Newfoundland, came up with the idea of a quilt drive after recalling a similar project back home.

She initially considered donating the quilts to the homeless but then saw a story on a television newscast featuring a women's shelter.

She pitched the idea to the other women, who embraced the project.

Bishop contacted shelter officials, who told her how many beds they needed quilts for and also explained how the residents could use sheets, pillow cases and toiletries.

The congregation responded enthusiastically to calls for supplies, bringing in fabric for the quilts, bedding, towels, mittens, purses, toothpaste, makeup, deodorant and other items.

"The response was overwhelming," said Bishop, adding organizers were determined their charitable efforts would involve donations and work rather than raising money.

"The thing just snowballed. It was such an overwhelming (response)."

Last Sunday, a representative from the shelter came to the church service to witness the quilts being dedicated before taking them back to the shelter to share with the residents.

The ceremony involved saying a prayer over the quilts and asking that they be used in God's service, according to Rev. Dennis Dolloff, the minister at the Church of Our Saviour.

"It is very exciting. It's a big celebration," he added.

The women met every Tuesday since last January to sew the fabric and Bishop would take the quilts home to finish them.

Knowing they were helping others made the project worthwhile.

"We wanted people to know there are people who care," Bishop said. "It was so uplifting."

The church is now working to buy Christmas presents for all the children staying at the shelter.

"We're going to put a gift under the tree for the children, something that can be theirs," Bishop said.

And next Tuesday, the church is donating bags of baby clothes, blankets and toiletries to Moorelands Baby Bundles, which provides basic baby supplies and clothing to new mothers living in poverty in Toronto.

New quilts offer 'shelter' from the storm

News Dec 02, 2008 Etobicoke Guardian

The women and children seeking protection at the North York Women's Shelter often arrive with nothing more than the clothes on their backs.

But they are sleeping more comfortably now, thanks to the caring hands of five women with Don Mills' Church of Our Saviour.

For the last year, Evelyn Bishop, Jill Monroe, Hazel Jones and Jenny Pasquill have been making 28 twin-sizes quilts for women and children living at the shelter while Cathy McIntyre has created 10 crib-sized baby quilts for the facility's tiniest residents.

"It was so easy, it was almost like this was laid on us," said Bishop, president of Church of Our Saviour's Anglican Church Women group.

"God wanted this done and He used us, because it all came together so easy."

Bishop, originally from Newfoundland, came up with the idea of a quilt drive after recalling a similar project back home.

She initially considered donating the quilts to the homeless but then saw a story on a television newscast featuring a women's shelter.

She pitched the idea to the other women, who embraced the project.

Bishop contacted shelter officials, who told her how many beds they needed quilts for and also explained how the residents could use sheets, pillow cases and toiletries.

The congregation responded enthusiastically to calls for supplies, bringing in fabric for the quilts, bedding, towels, mittens, purses, toothpaste, makeup, deodorant and other items.

"The response was overwhelming," said Bishop, adding organizers were determined their charitable efforts would involve donations and work rather than raising money.

"The thing just snowballed. It was such an overwhelming (response)."

Last Sunday, a representative from the shelter came to the church service to witness the quilts being dedicated before taking them back to the shelter to share with the residents.

The ceremony involved saying a prayer over the quilts and asking that they be used in God's service, according to Rev. Dennis Dolloff, the minister at the Church of Our Saviour.

"It is very exciting. It's a big celebration," he added.

The women met every Tuesday since last January to sew the fabric and Bishop would take the quilts home to finish them.

Knowing they were helping others made the project worthwhile.

"We wanted people to know there are people who care," Bishop said. "It was so uplifting."

The church is now working to buy Christmas presents for all the children staying at the shelter.

"We're going to put a gift under the tree for the children, something that can be theirs," Bishop said.

And next Tuesday, the church is donating bags of baby clothes, blankets and toiletries to Moorelands Baby Bundles, which provides basic baby supplies and clothing to new mothers living in poverty in Toronto.