Baby Point residents acknowledge ‘hollow’ victory after land goes up for sale

News May 21, 2013 by Lisa Rainford Bloor West Villager

Nearby residents are acknowledging a “hollow” victory upon learning last week that the property at 66 Baby Point Rd. is on the market after its owner sought permission from the city to build a “mega mansion,” despite neighbours’ opposition.

“The rumour mill started a couple of weeks ago,” neighbour David Ceolin said on Monday, May 13. “I ran into an agent outside the lot. We saw the sign go up on Friday.”

For years the community fought tooth and nail to stop Lorne Bozinoff and his wife from demolishing the heritage cottage and building an almost 6,000 square foot house in its place.

“I think the community feels it was worth it to stand up for the neighbourhood. It must have had some impact because now the lot’s for sale,” Ceolin said.

The original 1920’s Arts and Craft cottage was demolished in November 2010, seven months after Toronto City Council granted its owners site plan approval making them eligible for a building permit. The couple planned to replace the historic Robert Home Smith-designed one-and-a-half storey house to make room for a 5,800 sq-ft., three-storey detached dwelling. Bozinoff assured the community the new home would blend in with the existing character of the neighbourhood.

“I don’t want the house to stick out like a sore thumb,” Bozinoff once said at a public meeting. “We’ve looked at a lot of the houses in the neighbourhood and captured some of their features.”

Repeated requests for comment went unanswered by The Villager’s press deadline.

When a Committee of Adjustment granted the Bozinoffs “a minor variance” allowing them to build their new house mere metres from the sidewalk, area residents fought the decision at the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) and lost. The provincial body deemed the development “appropriate.” The property is currently listed for sale at $2,495,000.

Area real estate agent Nutan Brown said the property had yet to receive any offers as of May 16.

“I wish him all the best. I hope he’s successful in securing this price point, but I feel it’s a little ambitious,” said Brown.

Looking for a silver lining, Ceolin said the community’s battle served to heighten awareness about the potential for people coming into the area and making over the community.

“I think we’re all sort of relieved, but still holding our breath. Here’s the legacy we’re left with. He levels one of the most beautiful houses on the circle and walks away,” said Ceolin, who added the property was purchased for $1.8 million.

Kevin O’Doherty, an 11-year Baby Point resident, said he is feeling “somewhat ambivalent.” Tearing down the historic cottage has “left a gaping hole in the community.”

“The process is such that if (a project) goes to the OMB and it’s within the Official Plan guidelines, it’ll get approved,” said O’Doherty. “The control is not in the hands of the taxpayer – it’s clearly in the hands of the developer.”

In Baby Point, according to Sue Fenwick, a resident of 11 years, it’s not about having the biggest or flashiest house.

“It’s about the people. It’s a community with a heart,” she said. “I don’t like the disrespect that was shown to the community.”

There is apprehension as to what will happen next, according to Dr. Robert Galway, who has lived in Baby Point for the past four decades. No matter what size structure is built, the streetscape will be altered, he said.

“We need better protection from our elected government officials,” said Galway. “Everyone who got involved from the committee of adjustment to council to the OMB has let us down.”

Efforts to stop the proposed development led Galway to create the Baby Point Heritage Foundation (BPHF), which is dedicated to preserving, protecting and increasing the knowledge and respect for the history as well as the architectural and cultural heritage of the Baby Point area.

“The neighbourhood is now cognizant of what a great resource this neighbourhood that goes back 300 years is,” he said. The group is working towards a Heritage District designation.

“We have submitted as formal application to the city,” said Galway.

He is also in the midst of co-writing a book about the history of Baby Point. On Friday, May 24, the BPHF is hosting a special event and social to view the Rogers TV program, Structures, featuring Baby Point.

Baby Point residents acknowledge ‘hollow’ victory after land goes up for sale

Neighbours fought building of mega mansion after historic home demolished

News May 21, 2013 by Lisa Rainford Bloor West Villager

Nearby residents are acknowledging a “hollow” victory upon learning last week that the property at 66 Baby Point Rd. is on the market after its owner sought permission from the city to build a “mega mansion,” despite neighbours’ opposition.

“The rumour mill started a couple of weeks ago,” neighbour David Ceolin said on Monday, May 13. “I ran into an agent outside the lot. We saw the sign go up on Friday.”

For years the community fought tooth and nail to stop Lorne Bozinoff and his wife from demolishing the heritage cottage and building an almost 6,000 square foot house in its place.

“I think the community feels it was worth it to stand up for the neighbourhood. It must have had some impact because now the lot’s for sale,” Ceolin said.

The original 1920’s Arts and Craft cottage was demolished in November 2010, seven months after Toronto City Council granted its owners site plan approval making them eligible for a building permit. The couple planned to replace the historic Robert Home Smith-designed one-and-a-half storey house to make room for a 5,800 sq-ft., three-storey detached dwelling. Bozinoff assured the community the new home would blend in with the existing character of the neighbourhood.

“I don’t want the house to stick out like a sore thumb,” Bozinoff once said at a public meeting. “We’ve looked at a lot of the houses in the neighbourhood and captured some of their features.”

Repeated requests for comment went unanswered by The Villager’s press deadline.

When a Committee of Adjustment granted the Bozinoffs “a minor variance” allowing them to build their new house mere metres from the sidewalk, area residents fought the decision at the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) and lost. The provincial body deemed the development “appropriate.” The property is currently listed for sale at $2,495,000.

Area real estate agent Nutan Brown said the property had yet to receive any offers as of May 16.

“I wish him all the best. I hope he’s successful in securing this price point, but I feel it’s a little ambitious,” said Brown.

Looking for a silver lining, Ceolin said the community’s battle served to heighten awareness about the potential for people coming into the area and making over the community.

“I think we’re all sort of relieved, but still holding our breath. Here’s the legacy we’re left with. He levels one of the most beautiful houses on the circle and walks away,” said Ceolin, who added the property was purchased for $1.8 million.

Kevin O’Doherty, an 11-year Baby Point resident, said he is feeling “somewhat ambivalent.” Tearing down the historic cottage has “left a gaping hole in the community.”

“The process is such that if (a project) goes to the OMB and it’s within the Official Plan guidelines, it’ll get approved,” said O’Doherty. “The control is not in the hands of the taxpayer – it’s clearly in the hands of the developer.”

In Baby Point, according to Sue Fenwick, a resident of 11 years, it’s not about having the biggest or flashiest house.

“It’s about the people. It’s a community with a heart,” she said. “I don’t like the disrespect that was shown to the community.”

There is apprehension as to what will happen next, according to Dr. Robert Galway, who has lived in Baby Point for the past four decades. No matter what size structure is built, the streetscape will be altered, he said.

“We need better protection from our elected government officials,” said Galway. “Everyone who got involved from the committee of adjustment to council to the OMB has let us down.”

Efforts to stop the proposed development led Galway to create the Baby Point Heritage Foundation (BPHF), which is dedicated to preserving, protecting and increasing the knowledge and respect for the history as well as the architectural and cultural heritage of the Baby Point area.

“The neighbourhood is now cognizant of what a great resource this neighbourhood that goes back 300 years is,” he said. The group is working towards a Heritage District designation.

“We have submitted as formal application to the city,” said Galway.

He is also in the midst of co-writing a book about the history of Baby Point. On Friday, May 24, the BPHF is hosting a special event and social to view the Rogers TV program, Structures, featuring Baby Point.

Baby Point residents acknowledge ‘hollow’ victory after land goes up for sale

Neighbours fought building of mega mansion after historic home demolished

News May 21, 2013 by Lisa Rainford Bloor West Villager

Nearby residents are acknowledging a “hollow” victory upon learning last week that the property at 66 Baby Point Rd. is on the market after its owner sought permission from the city to build a “mega mansion,” despite neighbours’ opposition.

“The rumour mill started a couple of weeks ago,” neighbour David Ceolin said on Monday, May 13. “I ran into an agent outside the lot. We saw the sign go up on Friday.”

For years the community fought tooth and nail to stop Lorne Bozinoff and his wife from demolishing the heritage cottage and building an almost 6,000 square foot house in its place.

“I think the community feels it was worth it to stand up for the neighbourhood. It must have had some impact because now the lot’s for sale,” Ceolin said.

The original 1920’s Arts and Craft cottage was demolished in November 2010, seven months after Toronto City Council granted its owners site plan approval making them eligible for a building permit. The couple planned to replace the historic Robert Home Smith-designed one-and-a-half storey house to make room for a 5,800 sq-ft., three-storey detached dwelling. Bozinoff assured the community the new home would blend in with the existing character of the neighbourhood.

“I don’t want the house to stick out like a sore thumb,” Bozinoff once said at a public meeting. “We’ve looked at a lot of the houses in the neighbourhood and captured some of their features.”

Repeated requests for comment went unanswered by The Villager’s press deadline.

When a Committee of Adjustment granted the Bozinoffs “a minor variance” allowing them to build their new house mere metres from the sidewalk, area residents fought the decision at the Ontario Municipal Board (OMB) and lost. The provincial body deemed the development “appropriate.” The property is currently listed for sale at $2,495,000.

Area real estate agent Nutan Brown said the property had yet to receive any offers as of May 16.

“I wish him all the best. I hope he’s successful in securing this price point, but I feel it’s a little ambitious,” said Brown.

Looking for a silver lining, Ceolin said the community’s battle served to heighten awareness about the potential for people coming into the area and making over the community.

“I think we’re all sort of relieved, but still holding our breath. Here’s the legacy we’re left with. He levels one of the most beautiful houses on the circle and walks away,” said Ceolin, who added the property was purchased for $1.8 million.

Kevin O’Doherty, an 11-year Baby Point resident, said he is feeling “somewhat ambivalent.” Tearing down the historic cottage has “left a gaping hole in the community.”

“The process is such that if (a project) goes to the OMB and it’s within the Official Plan guidelines, it’ll get approved,” said O’Doherty. “The control is not in the hands of the taxpayer – it’s clearly in the hands of the developer.”

In Baby Point, according to Sue Fenwick, a resident of 11 years, it’s not about having the biggest or flashiest house.

“It’s about the people. It’s a community with a heart,” she said. “I don’t like the disrespect that was shown to the community.”

There is apprehension as to what will happen next, according to Dr. Robert Galway, who has lived in Baby Point for the past four decades. No matter what size structure is built, the streetscape will be altered, he said.

“We need better protection from our elected government officials,” said Galway. “Everyone who got involved from the committee of adjustment to council to the OMB has let us down.”

Efforts to stop the proposed development led Galway to create the Baby Point Heritage Foundation (BPHF), which is dedicated to preserving, protecting and increasing the knowledge and respect for the history as well as the architectural and cultural heritage of the Baby Point area.

“The neighbourhood is now cognizant of what a great resource this neighbourhood that goes back 300 years is,” he said. The group is working towards a Heritage District designation.

“We have submitted as formal application to the city,” said Galway.

He is also in the midst of co-writing a book about the history of Baby Point. On Friday, May 24, the BPHF is hosting a special event and social to view the Rogers TV program, Structures, featuring Baby Point.