Toronto’s East Chinatown archway gets stamp of approval

News May 07, 2013 by David Nickle Beach Mirror

Six years ago, the entry to East Chinatown was just a Green P parking lot on the north side of Gerrard Street East.

Today, there’s still a parking lot, but towering over it is the Zhong Hua Men Archway – a traditional Chinatown gate that welcomes visitors to the bustling Asian markets and restaurants around the intersection of Broadview Avenue and Gerrard.

And now, the gate is one of eight from across the country commemorated on a special release of Chinatown Gate stamps by Canada Post.

The stamps were issued May 1 to celebrate Asian Heritage month. Local Ward 30 Councillor Paula Fletcher said the arch, which cost nearly $1 million to build and is 15 metres high, has done the community proud.

“The fact that the archway was built in 2009 means that Toronto can be on a stamp in 2013,” said Fletcher. “It is the only archway in the City of Toronto. Canada Post has honored eight cities altogether.”

The gates are a traditional fixture of Chinese urban life. Known as paifang in Mandarin, the stone and wood structures were used to indicate different neighbourhoods in Chinese cities.

Toronto’s gate features unique elements to commemorate the experiences and trials of Chinese immigrants in the 20th century. It also features two stone lions, a gift of the Chinese government.

Toronto’s East Chinatown archway gets stamp of approval

Canada Post commemorates eight Chinatown gates from across the country

News May 07, 2013 by David Nickle Beach Mirror

Six years ago, the entry to East Chinatown was just a Green P parking lot on the north side of Gerrard Street East.

Today, there’s still a parking lot, but towering over it is the Zhong Hua Men Archway – a traditional Chinatown gate that welcomes visitors to the bustling Asian markets and restaurants around the intersection of Broadview Avenue and Gerrard.

And now, the gate is one of eight from across the country commemorated on a special release of Chinatown Gate stamps by Canada Post.

The stamps were issued May 1 to celebrate Asian Heritage month. Local Ward 30 Councillor Paula Fletcher said the arch, which cost nearly $1 million to build and is 15 metres high, has done the community proud.

“The fact that the archway was built in 2009 means that Toronto can be on a stamp in 2013,” said Fletcher. “It is the only archway in the City of Toronto. Canada Post has honored eight cities altogether.”

The gates are a traditional fixture of Chinese urban life. Known as paifang in Mandarin, the stone and wood structures were used to indicate different neighbourhoods in Chinese cities.

Toronto’s gate features unique elements to commemorate the experiences and trials of Chinese immigrants in the 20th century. It also features two stone lions, a gift of the Chinese government.

Toronto’s East Chinatown archway gets stamp of approval

Canada Post commemorates eight Chinatown gates from across the country

News May 07, 2013 by David Nickle Beach Mirror

Six years ago, the entry to East Chinatown was just a Green P parking lot on the north side of Gerrard Street East.

Today, there’s still a parking lot, but towering over it is the Zhong Hua Men Archway – a traditional Chinatown gate that welcomes visitors to the bustling Asian markets and restaurants around the intersection of Broadview Avenue and Gerrard.

And now, the gate is one of eight from across the country commemorated on a special release of Chinatown Gate stamps by Canada Post.

The stamps were issued May 1 to celebrate Asian Heritage month. Local Ward 30 Councillor Paula Fletcher said the arch, which cost nearly $1 million to build and is 15 metres high, has done the community proud.

“The fact that the archway was built in 2009 means that Toronto can be on a stamp in 2013,” said Fletcher. “It is the only archway in the City of Toronto. Canada Post has honored eight cities altogether.”

The gates are a traditional fixture of Chinese urban life. Known as paifang in Mandarin, the stone and wood structures were used to indicate different neighbourhoods in Chinese cities.

Toronto’s gate features unique elements to commemorate the experiences and trials of Chinese immigrants in the 20th century. It also features two stone lions, a gift of the Chinese government.