Scarborough Civic Centre takes steps to preserve heritage items

News Apr 16, 2013 by Mike Adler Scarborough Mirror

One of the oldest books in the city’s care, the Thomson Bible, sat until last month in a case under the main staircase at Scarborough Civic Centre, its open pages slowly fading and curling.

But thanks to a resident who alerted a local councillor, Paul Ainslie, the bible, a family possession of Scarborough’s first settlers David and Mary Thomson, will be better preserved and other historical items at the Scarborough Civic Centre will be repaired or replaced.

The rescued book, dated from 1815, was a gift to the former City of Scarborough in the 1970s but after amalgamation wasn’t logged as a city artifact.

Overlooked, it remained on display for an excessive length of time, exposed to “fairly severe light and heat conditions,” Wayne Reeves, the city’s chief museum services curator, said.

“Things get lost in the shuffle,” he said. “It was fortuitous that this was in a location that wasn’t in direct sunlight.”

Acting on a request from Ainslie, Reeves and Scarborough Historical Museum curator Madeleine Callaghan led a team which examined each of the rotunda’s long standing historical displays, including the Hastings Buggy and Cutter, which they said also require some care.

Young museum volunteers will clean and repair the old horse-drawn carts, moving them out of the soil and houseplants they have sat in and preparing a new interpretive panel for the display.

And likely starting next year, the same volunteer group, called the Scarborough Museum Youth Collective, will work to identify artifacts that can tell “great stories of Scarborough” in some of the rotunda’s display spaces, Reeves said.

“These are all the great changes that you’ll see.”

Other rotunda cases have for years houses objects related to the 1973 visit of Queen Elizabeth and Prince Phillip to Scarborough, photographs of the 1980 Marathon of Hope appearance at the building by Terry Fox, paper items owned by the Scarborough Historical Society, and sculptures by Elizabeth Fraser Williamson.

Scarborough Civic Centre takes steps to preserve heritage items

News Apr 16, 2013 by Mike Adler Scarborough Mirror

One of the oldest books in the city’s care, the Thomson Bible, sat until last month in a case under the main staircase at Scarborough Civic Centre, its open pages slowly fading and curling.

But thanks to a resident who alerted a local councillor, Paul Ainslie, the bible, a family possession of Scarborough’s first settlers David and Mary Thomson, will be better preserved and other historical items at the Scarborough Civic Centre will be repaired or replaced.

The rescued book, dated from 1815, was a gift to the former City of Scarborough in the 1970s but after amalgamation wasn’t logged as a city artifact.

Overlooked, it remained on display for an excessive length of time, exposed to “fairly severe light and heat conditions,” Wayne Reeves, the city’s chief museum services curator, said.

“Things get lost in the shuffle,” he said. “It was fortuitous that this was in a location that wasn’t in direct sunlight.”

Acting on a request from Ainslie, Reeves and Scarborough Historical Museum curator Madeleine Callaghan led a team which examined each of the rotunda’s long standing historical displays, including the Hastings Buggy and Cutter, which they said also require some care.

Young museum volunteers will clean and repair the old horse-drawn carts, moving them out of the soil and houseplants they have sat in and preparing a new interpretive panel for the display.

And likely starting next year, the same volunteer group, called the Scarborough Museum Youth Collective, will work to identify artifacts that can tell “great stories of Scarborough” in some of the rotunda’s display spaces, Reeves said.

“These are all the great changes that you’ll see.”

Other rotunda cases have for years houses objects related to the 1973 visit of Queen Elizabeth and Prince Phillip to Scarborough, photographs of the 1980 Marathon of Hope appearance at the building by Terry Fox, paper items owned by the Scarborough Historical Society, and sculptures by Elizabeth Fraser Williamson.

Scarborough Civic Centre takes steps to preserve heritage items

News Apr 16, 2013 by Mike Adler Scarborough Mirror

One of the oldest books in the city’s care, the Thomson Bible, sat until last month in a case under the main staircase at Scarborough Civic Centre, its open pages slowly fading and curling.

But thanks to a resident who alerted a local councillor, Paul Ainslie, the bible, a family possession of Scarborough’s first settlers David and Mary Thomson, will be better preserved and other historical items at the Scarborough Civic Centre will be repaired or replaced.

The rescued book, dated from 1815, was a gift to the former City of Scarborough in the 1970s but after amalgamation wasn’t logged as a city artifact.

Overlooked, it remained on display for an excessive length of time, exposed to “fairly severe light and heat conditions,” Wayne Reeves, the city’s chief museum services curator, said.

“Things get lost in the shuffle,” he said. “It was fortuitous that this was in a location that wasn’t in direct sunlight.”

Acting on a request from Ainslie, Reeves and Scarborough Historical Museum curator Madeleine Callaghan led a team which examined each of the rotunda’s long standing historical displays, including the Hastings Buggy and Cutter, which they said also require some care.

Young museum volunteers will clean and repair the old horse-drawn carts, moving them out of the soil and houseplants they have sat in and preparing a new interpretive panel for the display.

And likely starting next year, the same volunteer group, called the Scarborough Museum Youth Collective, will work to identify artifacts that can tell “great stories of Scarborough” in some of the rotunda’s display spaces, Reeves said.

“These are all the great changes that you’ll see.”

Other rotunda cases have for years houses objects related to the 1973 visit of Queen Elizabeth and Prince Phillip to Scarborough, photographs of the 1980 Marathon of Hope appearance at the building by Terry Fox, paper items owned by the Scarborough Historical Society, and sculptures by Elizabeth Fraser Williamson.