Sprott Foundation donation to help Regent Park community food centres

News Mar 22, 2013 by Justin Skinner City Centre Mirror

A generous gift from the Sprott Foundation will help families in Regent Park gain better food security.

The foundation donated $5 million to Community Food Centres Canada (CFCC) with the funds being used to start community food centres in Regent Park, Winnipeg and Dartmouth.

To establish the Regent Park branch, CFCC will partner with the Toronto Christian Resource Centre (TCRC) at 40 Oak St.

The food centre will be modelled after The Stop Community Food Centre in Wychwood Barns. Rather than copying The Stop’s model wholesale, however, the Regent Park branch will strive to meet the needs of the communities it serves.

“We’re in the middle of community consultation now,” said TCRC executive director Louise Moody. “We’re meeting with a lot of our community food partners, doing surveys with community residents and talking to tenants in 40 Oaks, and meal program participants.”

While TCRC currently holds a meal program out of its community kitchen that serves some 300 meals a day and is involved with other food-based programs, the new community food centre will allow the organization to expand its programming.

“We’re hoping to open a new parkette this year where we’ll open up some raised gardens and (garden) beds for smaller children, but a lot of the enhancements for us will specialize around skills development,” Moody said.

With a full community kitchen in place in 40 Oaks and a few community gardens already in place in Regent Park, the infrastructure is already in place for education and skills-based programs.

CFCC president and CEO Nick Saul said his organization focuses on three areas: emergency food access, skill-building programs and education and civic engagement. He acknowledged the Regent Park Community Food Centre would not be well-served by a food bank, but noted the location is ideal for other programming.

“One of the big draws for us in Regent Park is that (TCRC) really did a great job of reinventing their community space and they needed help populating it with programming,” he said. “They’re a great organization with a history of doing good food work, so now we’re in a good place to come along and provide resources, money and an approach with a proven track record.”

The community food centre will mark yet another step in the large-scale transformation of the Regent Park community as it transitions from being a neglected and isolated area to a much better-served area.

Saul said Regent Park residents will steer the new programming, but said food-growing programs based out of the area’s allotment and community gardens, cooking workshops and food-related or income-related civic engagement programs are among the services offered at other community food centres that could prove useful in Regent Park.

Moody is hopeful the new programming will be in place once the community consultation is complete, which will likely result in a roll-out this fall.

Sprott Foundation donation to help Regent Park community food centres

Infrastructure already in place for education and skills-based programs

News Mar 22, 2013 by Justin Skinner City Centre Mirror

A generous gift from the Sprott Foundation will help families in Regent Park gain better food security.

The foundation donated $5 million to Community Food Centres Canada (CFCC) with the funds being used to start community food centres in Regent Park, Winnipeg and Dartmouth.

To establish the Regent Park branch, CFCC will partner with the Toronto Christian Resource Centre (TCRC) at 40 Oak St.

The food centre will be modelled after The Stop Community Food Centre in Wychwood Barns. Rather than copying The Stop’s model wholesale, however, the Regent Park branch will strive to meet the needs of the communities it serves.

“We’re in the middle of community consultation now,” said TCRC executive director Louise Moody. “We’re meeting with a lot of our community food partners, doing surveys with community residents and talking to tenants in 40 Oaks, and meal program participants.”

While TCRC currently holds a meal program out of its community kitchen that serves some 300 meals a day and is involved with other food-based programs, the new community food centre will allow the organization to expand its programming.

“We’re hoping to open a new parkette this year where we’ll open up some raised gardens and (garden) beds for smaller children, but a lot of the enhancements for us will specialize around skills development,” Moody said.

With a full community kitchen in place in 40 Oaks and a few community gardens already in place in Regent Park, the infrastructure is already in place for education and skills-based programs.

CFCC president and CEO Nick Saul said his organization focuses on three areas: emergency food access, skill-building programs and education and civic engagement. He acknowledged the Regent Park Community Food Centre would not be well-served by a food bank, but noted the location is ideal for other programming.

“One of the big draws for us in Regent Park is that (TCRC) really did a great job of reinventing their community space and they needed help populating it with programming,” he said. “They’re a great organization with a history of doing good food work, so now we’re in a good place to come along and provide resources, money and an approach with a proven track record.”

The community food centre will mark yet another step in the large-scale transformation of the Regent Park community as it transitions from being a neglected and isolated area to a much better-served area.

Saul said Regent Park residents will steer the new programming, but said food-growing programs based out of the area’s allotment and community gardens, cooking workshops and food-related or income-related civic engagement programs are among the services offered at other community food centres that could prove useful in Regent Park.

Moody is hopeful the new programming will be in place once the community consultation is complete, which will likely result in a roll-out this fall.

Sprott Foundation donation to help Regent Park community food centres

Infrastructure already in place for education and skills-based programs

News Mar 22, 2013 by Justin Skinner City Centre Mirror

A generous gift from the Sprott Foundation will help families in Regent Park gain better food security.

The foundation donated $5 million to Community Food Centres Canada (CFCC) with the funds being used to start community food centres in Regent Park, Winnipeg and Dartmouth.

To establish the Regent Park branch, CFCC will partner with the Toronto Christian Resource Centre (TCRC) at 40 Oak St.

The food centre will be modelled after The Stop Community Food Centre in Wychwood Barns. Rather than copying The Stop’s model wholesale, however, the Regent Park branch will strive to meet the needs of the communities it serves.

“We’re in the middle of community consultation now,” said TCRC executive director Louise Moody. “We’re meeting with a lot of our community food partners, doing surveys with community residents and talking to tenants in 40 Oaks, and meal program participants.”

While TCRC currently holds a meal program out of its community kitchen that serves some 300 meals a day and is involved with other food-based programs, the new community food centre will allow the organization to expand its programming.

“We’re hoping to open a new parkette this year where we’ll open up some raised gardens and (garden) beds for smaller children, but a lot of the enhancements for us will specialize around skills development,” Moody said.

With a full community kitchen in place in 40 Oaks and a few community gardens already in place in Regent Park, the infrastructure is already in place for education and skills-based programs.

CFCC president and CEO Nick Saul said his organization focuses on three areas: emergency food access, skill-building programs and education and civic engagement. He acknowledged the Regent Park Community Food Centre would not be well-served by a food bank, but noted the location is ideal for other programming.

“One of the big draws for us in Regent Park is that (TCRC) really did a great job of reinventing their community space and they needed help populating it with programming,” he said. “They’re a great organization with a history of doing good food work, so now we’re in a good place to come along and provide resources, money and an approach with a proven track record.”

The community food centre will mark yet another step in the large-scale transformation of the Regent Park community as it transitions from being a neglected and isolated area to a much better-served area.

Saul said Regent Park residents will steer the new programming, but said food-growing programs based out of the area’s allotment and community gardens, cooking workshops and food-related or income-related civic engagement programs are among the services offered at other community food centres that could prove useful in Regent Park.

Moody is hopeful the new programming will be in place once the community consultation is complete, which will likely result in a roll-out this fall.