York connection at afteROCK play series at Daniels Spectrum

News Mar 03, 2013 by Fannie Sunshine York Guardian

Roselyn Kelada-Sedra was on a retreat at a Trappist monastery in upstate New York when she wrote the key points of what would later become her first full-length play.

“Then it sat there for a year,” the York resident recalled.

She eventually showed it to a director, who encouraged her to keep writing. After a year of revisions, Six & Eight was complete.

“I had no idea how much work it would be,” Kelada-Sedra said.

The first two acts of an earlier draft of the play was showcased at b current’s rock.paper.sistahz festival last May, but a completely different version will be shown during b current’s afteROCK play series March 4 to 10. B current is a performance arts company in Toronto.

The series, to be presented at COBA’s Studio Theatre inside Daniels Spectrum, 585 Dundas St. E., will showcase theatre creators and performance work by black women artists and artists of colour.

The debut series will be made up of two plays – one of them Kelada-Sedra’s – and a public reading of Harriet’s Daughter, by York resident M. Nourbese Philip, who was travelling and unavailable for comment for this story.

Directed by Taylor Marie Graham and choreographed by Alcina Chiu, Six & Eight tells the story of a young woman (Kelada-Sedra) and man (Kaleb Alexander) who meet on the dance floor and feel an immediate connection. As Sadiyah learns to trust Christian to lead her in swing dancing, she also puts her trust in him as a person. For Christian, he revels in the way dance expresses thoughts without saying a word, like mind reading. And what if you could transfer that language into a relationship, whereby reading each other’s body ultimately means reading each other’s minds?

“I definitely didn’t know how to dance,” Kelada-Sedra said when asked if she drew from personal experience when penning the piece. “You see relationships all the time, where people don’t mean to screw each other up but do serious damage. Bodies show what resonates with each other, even if the words don’t match. Swing dancing seems so fun and perfectly harmless, but I had no idea people were so intense about swing.”

To prepare for the performance, Kelada-Sedra took swing dancing lessons with Bees’ Knees Dance and quickly learned it was more technical than originally thought.

“I didn’t know there was such a fine balance between holding a firm frame and being flexible,” she said. “It’s not sexual, but it can be sensual.”

A former journalist, Kelada-Sedra said goodbye to her former career three years ago and “slept and read novels until I felt sane again” while contemplating what direction to take her life. After making a chart of every career experience she had, along with positive and negative impacts, she settled on theatre.

“I love theatre,” she said during rehearsals for Six & Eight. “To paraphrase from (theatre director) Andrew Tidmarsh, theatre is a noble act because people volunteer to put themselves through pain, madness, falling in love and all powerful things about being human and let people watch. It’s the most generous thing people can do for each other. I hope people approach (Six & Eight) with grace and it inspires people to live with grace with each other.”

Six & Eight will preview Monday, March 4 at 8:30 p.m. Tickets cost $15.

Regular shows will run Wednesday, March 6 and Friday, March 8 at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday, March 9 at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $20 and $17 for seniors and students.

For tickets or information, visit www.bcurrent.ca or call 416-533-1500.

York connection at afteROCK play series at Daniels Spectrum

News Mar 03, 2013 by Fannie Sunshine York Guardian

Roselyn Kelada-Sedra was on a retreat at a Trappist monastery in upstate New York when she wrote the key points of what would later become her first full-length play.

“Then it sat there for a year,” the York resident recalled.

She eventually showed it to a director, who encouraged her to keep writing. After a year of revisions, Six & Eight was complete.

“I had no idea how much work it would be,” Kelada-Sedra said.

The first two acts of an earlier draft of the play was showcased at b current’s rock.paper.sistahz festival last May, but a completely different version will be shown during b current’s afteROCK play series March 4 to 10. B current is a performance arts company in Toronto.

The series, to be presented at COBA’s Studio Theatre inside Daniels Spectrum, 585 Dundas St. E., will showcase theatre creators and performance work by black women artists and artists of colour.

The debut series will be made up of two plays – one of them Kelada-Sedra’s – and a public reading of Harriet’s Daughter, by York resident M. Nourbese Philip, who was travelling and unavailable for comment for this story.

Directed by Taylor Marie Graham and choreographed by Alcina Chiu, Six & Eight tells the story of a young woman (Kelada-Sedra) and man (Kaleb Alexander) who meet on the dance floor and feel an immediate connection. As Sadiyah learns to trust Christian to lead her in swing dancing, she also puts her trust in him as a person. For Christian, he revels in the way dance expresses thoughts without saying a word, like mind reading. And what if you could transfer that language into a relationship, whereby reading each other’s body ultimately means reading each other’s minds?

“I definitely didn’t know how to dance,” Kelada-Sedra said when asked if she drew from personal experience when penning the piece. “You see relationships all the time, where people don’t mean to screw each other up but do serious damage. Bodies show what resonates with each other, even if the words don’t match. Swing dancing seems so fun and perfectly harmless, but I had no idea people were so intense about swing.”

To prepare for the performance, Kelada-Sedra took swing dancing lessons with Bees’ Knees Dance and quickly learned it was more technical than originally thought.

“I didn’t know there was such a fine balance between holding a firm frame and being flexible,” she said. “It’s not sexual, but it can be sensual.”

A former journalist, Kelada-Sedra said goodbye to her former career three years ago and “slept and read novels until I felt sane again” while contemplating what direction to take her life. After making a chart of every career experience she had, along with positive and negative impacts, she settled on theatre.

“I love theatre,” she said during rehearsals for Six & Eight. “To paraphrase from (theatre director) Andrew Tidmarsh, theatre is a noble act because people volunteer to put themselves through pain, madness, falling in love and all powerful things about being human and let people watch. It’s the most generous thing people can do for each other. I hope people approach (Six & Eight) with grace and it inspires people to live with grace with each other.”

Six & Eight will preview Monday, March 4 at 8:30 p.m. Tickets cost $15.

Regular shows will run Wednesday, March 6 and Friday, March 8 at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday, March 9 at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $20 and $17 for seniors and students.

For tickets or information, visit www.bcurrent.ca or call 416-533-1500.

York connection at afteROCK play series at Daniels Spectrum

News Mar 03, 2013 by Fannie Sunshine York Guardian

Roselyn Kelada-Sedra was on a retreat at a Trappist monastery in upstate New York when she wrote the key points of what would later become her first full-length play.

“Then it sat there for a year,” the York resident recalled.

She eventually showed it to a director, who encouraged her to keep writing. After a year of revisions, Six & Eight was complete.

“I had no idea how much work it would be,” Kelada-Sedra said.

The first two acts of an earlier draft of the play was showcased at b current’s rock.paper.sistahz festival last May, but a completely different version will be shown during b current’s afteROCK play series March 4 to 10. B current is a performance arts company in Toronto.

The series, to be presented at COBA’s Studio Theatre inside Daniels Spectrum, 585 Dundas St. E., will showcase theatre creators and performance work by black women artists and artists of colour.

The debut series will be made up of two plays – one of them Kelada-Sedra’s – and a public reading of Harriet’s Daughter, by York resident M. Nourbese Philip, who was travelling and unavailable for comment for this story.

Directed by Taylor Marie Graham and choreographed by Alcina Chiu, Six & Eight tells the story of a young woman (Kelada-Sedra) and man (Kaleb Alexander) who meet on the dance floor and feel an immediate connection. As Sadiyah learns to trust Christian to lead her in swing dancing, she also puts her trust in him as a person. For Christian, he revels in the way dance expresses thoughts without saying a word, like mind reading. And what if you could transfer that language into a relationship, whereby reading each other’s body ultimately means reading each other’s minds?

“I definitely didn’t know how to dance,” Kelada-Sedra said when asked if she drew from personal experience when penning the piece. “You see relationships all the time, where people don’t mean to screw each other up but do serious damage. Bodies show what resonates with each other, even if the words don’t match. Swing dancing seems so fun and perfectly harmless, but I had no idea people were so intense about swing.”

To prepare for the performance, Kelada-Sedra took swing dancing lessons with Bees’ Knees Dance and quickly learned it was more technical than originally thought.

“I didn’t know there was such a fine balance between holding a firm frame and being flexible,” she said. “It’s not sexual, but it can be sensual.”

A former journalist, Kelada-Sedra said goodbye to her former career three years ago and “slept and read novels until I felt sane again” while contemplating what direction to take her life. After making a chart of every career experience she had, along with positive and negative impacts, she settled on theatre.

“I love theatre,” she said during rehearsals for Six & Eight. “To paraphrase from (theatre director) Andrew Tidmarsh, theatre is a noble act because people volunteer to put themselves through pain, madness, falling in love and all powerful things about being human and let people watch. It’s the most generous thing people can do for each other. I hope people approach (Six & Eight) with grace and it inspires people to live with grace with each other.”

Six & Eight will preview Monday, March 4 at 8:30 p.m. Tickets cost $15.

Regular shows will run Wednesday, March 6 and Friday, March 8 at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday, March 9 at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $20 and $17 for seniors and students.

For tickets or information, visit www.bcurrent.ca or call 416-533-1500.