Challenging the traditional model

News Oct 30, 2007 City Centre Mirror

Building a recruitment agency for legal professionals seeking work outside of the traditional practice of law came more out of necessity than ambition for Randi Bean, the founder of Life After Law, a two-fold Toronto employment agency dedicated to placing lawyers into roles that have, until now, been deemed unconventional to the field of law.

Bean, a certified lawyer who graduated from York University's Osgoode Hall School of Law, watched as a disheartening trend was beginning to take shape around a decade ago that not only impinged on her life and career as a lawyer, but on those of an ever-increasing number of highly skilled law professionals around her, all similarly disgruntled and on the hunt for new work.

Bean remembers finally landing a law firm job - subsequent to multiple years of law school training - but like many before her, she then came to the realization that such a job was everything she thought it wouldn't be.

"I was not happy with what I was doing at the time. I wanted to do something else outside of the traditional practice of law," said Bean, who at the time worked within the confines of a law office and was eyeing a drastic change.

"I had a real strong sense I should be doing something else, but I wasn't really sure where to go. I just knew that it (a law office) wasn't for me."

The native of North Toronto then found herself exasperatingly spinning her wheels in search of a job from long-established law-based recruiters, who were devoted to filling law office positions, she said.

"They would keep sending me to work at law firms, which was exactly where I didn't want to go."

LAL, which opened an office in Vancouver but conducts much of its client-business activity by way of its website, has been finding law professionals alternative employment - jobs in such divisions as business development, immigration consultation, risk management, HR management, media-reporting, among many others - for seven years now, and is showing no signs of slowing down.

The company's untapped approach to recruiting lawyers - LAL is the first of its kind in Canada - and placing them outside of the realm of law has taken some getting used to, for some law types, she said, but from an job seeker's viewpoint there was (and still is) an explicit need.

"It was definitely a hard sell at first," she said, adding that people are just starting to see the value in the agency. "It started with a lot of people questioning us: 'These are lawyers, why would they want to do another job?'," she said.

"But I think that that (perception) has shifted quite substantially."

With the broad skill sets that her clients have been bringing to the table - the half-dozen-plus years of post secondary education in addition to the ensuing workplace experience - they become an immediate asset to any business, she said.

"Because of the educational background of our clients and because of their desire to do something different and expand, any business would be lucky to have any of them, regardless of the type of role that they (the client) decide to take on.

"They are all well-trained, bright achievers," she added.

Life After Law's placement services are paid for by the hiring client/business. Candidates are not required to pay a fee to be placed in a new career.

LAL, which is located just above the beaten Bay Street path at St. Clair Avenue East, Suite 800, is also on the verge of expanding its Toronto operation.

For more info on the agency, phone 416-789-1444 or visit www.lifeafterlaw.com.

Challenging the traditional model

Life After Law seeks to open up employment opportunities outside law office confines

News Oct 30, 2007 City Centre Mirror

Building a recruitment agency for legal professionals seeking work outside of the traditional practice of law came more out of necessity than ambition for Randi Bean, the founder of Life After Law, a two-fold Toronto employment agency dedicated to placing lawyers into roles that have, until now, been deemed unconventional to the field of law.

Bean, a certified lawyer who graduated from York University's Osgoode Hall School of Law, watched as a disheartening trend was beginning to take shape around a decade ago that not only impinged on her life and career as a lawyer, but on those of an ever-increasing number of highly skilled law professionals around her, all similarly disgruntled and on the hunt for new work.

Bean remembers finally landing a law firm job - subsequent to multiple years of law school training - but like many before her, she then came to the realization that such a job was everything she thought it wouldn't be.

"I was not happy with what I was doing at the time. I wanted to do something else outside of the traditional practice of law," said Bean, who at the time worked within the confines of a law office and was eyeing a drastic change.

"I had a real strong sense I should be doing something else, but I wasn't really sure where to go. I just knew that it (a law office) wasn't for me."

The native of North Toronto then found herself exasperatingly spinning her wheels in search of a job from long-established law-based recruiters, who were devoted to filling law office positions, she said.

"They would keep sending me to work at law firms, which was exactly where I didn't want to go."

LAL, which opened an office in Vancouver but conducts much of its client-business activity by way of its website, has been finding law professionals alternative employment - jobs in such divisions as business development, immigration consultation, risk management, HR management, media-reporting, among many others - for seven years now, and is showing no signs of slowing down.

The company's untapped approach to recruiting lawyers - LAL is the first of its kind in Canada - and placing them outside of the realm of law has taken some getting used to, for some law types, she said, but from an job seeker's viewpoint there was (and still is) an explicit need.

"It was definitely a hard sell at first," she said, adding that people are just starting to see the value in the agency. "It started with a lot of people questioning us: 'These are lawyers, why would they want to do another job?'," she said.

"But I think that that (perception) has shifted quite substantially."

With the broad skill sets that her clients have been bringing to the table - the half-dozen-plus years of post secondary education in addition to the ensuing workplace experience - they become an immediate asset to any business, she said.

"Because of the educational background of our clients and because of their desire to do something different and expand, any business would be lucky to have any of them, regardless of the type of role that they (the client) decide to take on.

"They are all well-trained, bright achievers," she added.

Life After Law's placement services are paid for by the hiring client/business. Candidates are not required to pay a fee to be placed in a new career.

LAL, which is located just above the beaten Bay Street path at St. Clair Avenue East, Suite 800, is also on the verge of expanding its Toronto operation.

For more info on the agency, phone 416-789-1444 or visit www.lifeafterlaw.com.

Challenging the traditional model

Life After Law seeks to open up employment opportunities outside law office confines

News Oct 30, 2007 City Centre Mirror

Building a recruitment agency for legal professionals seeking work outside of the traditional practice of law came more out of necessity than ambition for Randi Bean, the founder of Life After Law, a two-fold Toronto employment agency dedicated to placing lawyers into roles that have, until now, been deemed unconventional to the field of law.

Bean, a certified lawyer who graduated from York University's Osgoode Hall School of Law, watched as a disheartening trend was beginning to take shape around a decade ago that not only impinged on her life and career as a lawyer, but on those of an ever-increasing number of highly skilled law professionals around her, all similarly disgruntled and on the hunt for new work.

Bean remembers finally landing a law firm job - subsequent to multiple years of law school training - but like many before her, she then came to the realization that such a job was everything she thought it wouldn't be.

"I was not happy with what I was doing at the time. I wanted to do something else outside of the traditional practice of law," said Bean, who at the time worked within the confines of a law office and was eyeing a drastic change.

"I had a real strong sense I should be doing something else, but I wasn't really sure where to go. I just knew that it (a law office) wasn't for me."

The native of North Toronto then found herself exasperatingly spinning her wheels in search of a job from long-established law-based recruiters, who were devoted to filling law office positions, she said.

"They would keep sending me to work at law firms, which was exactly where I didn't want to go."

LAL, which opened an office in Vancouver but conducts much of its client-business activity by way of its website, has been finding law professionals alternative employment - jobs in such divisions as business development, immigration consultation, risk management, HR management, media-reporting, among many others - for seven years now, and is showing no signs of slowing down.

The company's untapped approach to recruiting lawyers - LAL is the first of its kind in Canada - and placing them outside of the realm of law has taken some getting used to, for some law types, she said, but from an job seeker's viewpoint there was (and still is) an explicit need.

"It was definitely a hard sell at first," she said, adding that people are just starting to see the value in the agency. "It started with a lot of people questioning us: 'These are lawyers, why would they want to do another job?'," she said.

"But I think that that (perception) has shifted quite substantially."

With the broad skill sets that her clients have been bringing to the table - the half-dozen-plus years of post secondary education in addition to the ensuing workplace experience - they become an immediate asset to any business, she said.

"Because of the educational background of our clients and because of their desire to do something different and expand, any business would be lucky to have any of them, regardless of the type of role that they (the client) decide to take on.

"They are all well-trained, bright achievers," she added.

Life After Law's placement services are paid for by the hiring client/business. Candidates are not required to pay a fee to be placed in a new career.

LAL, which is located just above the beaten Bay Street path at St. Clair Avenue East, Suite 800, is also on the verge of expanding its Toronto operation.

For more info on the agency, phone 416-789-1444 or visit www.lifeafterlaw.com.