Toronto agency's video shows women of all demographics affected by violence

Community Dec 05, 2017 by Justin Skinner City Centre Mirror

November was Women Abuse Prevention Month and Dec. 6 is recognized as the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women, but those at the Assaulted Women’s Helpline know there’s never a time when violence against women and its impacts should be forgotten.

The Toronto-based service offers provincewide 24/7 counselling, emotional support, referrals and information to women who are in, or who are fleeing, violent situations. Those who are concerned for a loved one dealing with violence can also call.

Most importantly, the service offers those supports free of judgment, knowing that abuse comes in many forms and doesn’t conform to some preconceived stereotypes.

The Assaulted Women’s Helpline (AWHL) recently released a video highlighting the latter fact by depicting a couple in a toney residence who get into an argument.

“It’s a well-dressed, professional couple who are arguing and animated,” said Sheila Phillips of the AWHL. “The woman turns her back to the man and starts moving away when the man grabs her by the hair and throws her backwards on the sofa.”

The video demonstrates that, contrary to commonly held misconceptions, violence against women is not confined to specific socioeconomic groups.

“People definitely have preconceptions about where abuse against women is happening — people can be very secure in their belief of ‘well, it doesn’t happen here,’” Phillips said.

The video was screened on a loop earlier this year in Yorkville, the perfect example of a neighbourhood where people tend to assume violence against women is a non-issue. Displayed on a large screen in the middle of the glamorous neighbourhood, the video definitely turned heads.

“Over the course of the evening, we saw more and more people noticing it,” Phillips said. “They were startled, baffled, asking ‘what the heck am I looking at?’”

In just over two months on YouTube, a video capturing the reactions of passersby has garnered more than 40,000 views as the AWHL aims to raise awareness regarding violence against women and the fact that anyone can be affected.

For more information on the AWHL, visit www.awhl.org.

Toronto agency's video shows women of all demographics affected by violence

Community Dec 05, 2017 by Justin Skinner City Centre Mirror

November was Women Abuse Prevention Month and Dec. 6 is recognized as the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women, but those at the Assaulted Women’s Helpline know there’s never a time when violence against women and its impacts should be forgotten.

The Toronto-based service offers provincewide 24/7 counselling, emotional support, referrals and information to women who are in, or who are fleeing, violent situations. Those who are concerned for a loved one dealing with violence can also call.

Most importantly, the service offers those supports free of judgment, knowing that abuse comes in many forms and doesn’t conform to some preconceived stereotypes.

The Assaulted Women’s Helpline (AWHL) recently released a video highlighting the latter fact by depicting a couple in a toney residence who get into an argument.

“It’s a well-dressed, professional couple who are arguing and animated,” said Sheila Phillips of the AWHL. “The woman turns her back to the man and starts moving away when the man grabs her by the hair and throws her backwards on the sofa.”

The video demonstrates that, contrary to commonly held misconceptions, violence against women is not confined to specific socioeconomic groups.

“People definitely have preconceptions about where abuse against women is happening — people can be very secure in their belief of ‘well, it doesn’t happen here,’” Phillips said.

The video was screened on a loop earlier this year in Yorkville, the perfect example of a neighbourhood where people tend to assume violence against women is a non-issue. Displayed on a large screen in the middle of the glamorous neighbourhood, the video definitely turned heads.

“Over the course of the evening, we saw more and more people noticing it,” Phillips said. “They were startled, baffled, asking ‘what the heck am I looking at?’”

In just over two months on YouTube, a video capturing the reactions of passersby has garnered more than 40,000 views as the AWHL aims to raise awareness regarding violence against women and the fact that anyone can be affected.

For more information on the AWHL, visit www.awhl.org.

Toronto agency's video shows women of all demographics affected by violence

Community Dec 05, 2017 by Justin Skinner City Centre Mirror

November was Women Abuse Prevention Month and Dec. 6 is recognized as the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women, but those at the Assaulted Women’s Helpline know there’s never a time when violence against women and its impacts should be forgotten.

The Toronto-based service offers provincewide 24/7 counselling, emotional support, referrals and information to women who are in, or who are fleeing, violent situations. Those who are concerned for a loved one dealing with violence can also call.

Most importantly, the service offers those supports free of judgment, knowing that abuse comes in many forms and doesn’t conform to some preconceived stereotypes.

The Assaulted Women’s Helpline (AWHL) recently released a video highlighting the latter fact by depicting a couple in a toney residence who get into an argument.

“It’s a well-dressed, professional couple who are arguing and animated,” said Sheila Phillips of the AWHL. “The woman turns her back to the man and starts moving away when the man grabs her by the hair and throws her backwards on the sofa.”

The video demonstrates that, contrary to commonly held misconceptions, violence against women is not confined to specific socioeconomic groups.

“People definitely have preconceptions about where abuse against women is happening — people can be very secure in their belief of ‘well, it doesn’t happen here,’” Phillips said.

The video was screened on a loop earlier this year in Yorkville, the perfect example of a neighbourhood where people tend to assume violence against women is a non-issue. Displayed on a large screen in the middle of the glamorous neighbourhood, the video definitely turned heads.

“Over the course of the evening, we saw more and more people noticing it,” Phillips said. “They were startled, baffled, asking ‘what the heck am I looking at?’”

In just over two months on YouTube, a video capturing the reactions of passersby has garnered more than 40,000 views as the AWHL aims to raise awareness regarding violence against women and the fact that anyone can be affected.

For more information on the AWHL, visit www.awhl.org.