Toronto chaplain trainer relishes opportunity 'to see lives change'

Community Sep 21, 2017 by Aaron D'Andrea York Guardian

Nine years ago, doctors gave Patrick White less than two years to live.

White, who was 65 at the time, had suffered three heart attacks, was diabetic and had several other serious health problems.

His doctors said he was in the final stages of heart failure.

“I never drank or smoked in my life, and I was just ready to go, but also I wasn’t ready to go,” the 74-year-old Weston resident told Metroland Media Toronto. “I can’t even put into words how I felt that it’s over. That’s it … I just accepted it. It became a reality, and I mean, we have all to face death, I know that, but it did become a real reality and that was about it.”

With nowhere left to go and no other options remaining, he felt the desire to talk to God, so he prayed, asking for more time to live and, in return, he vowed he would serve God.

“Things started changing,” he said.

Slowly, he began to feel better, both physically and mentally.

Once he was in better shape, White converted from Judaism to Christianity and switched careers from being a motivational speaker to becoming a chaplain so he could do advocacy and outreach work in his community.

To take his work further, six years ago he founded The Chaplains Office of Canada, where he and other chaplains that he trains from all over Canada continue to serve its clients located all across Ontario.

White runs the organization with money used from his pension and enrolment fees. He also gets help from community members through fundraising.

“People say you can’t be 74,” he said. “I work every day from five or six in the morning to about 11 or 12 (at night), all the time.”

During his time as a chaplain, he said he has seen drug addicts turn their lives around, parents who’ve lost babies recover from depression and many more “miracles.”

“I enjoy to see lives change. I enjoy to just get out there and do the best I can, but most of all, I thank God that he’s allowing me to stay alive,” he said. “I mean, I still have medical problems here every day sometimes, but the thing I enjoy the most is to see people with their lives turning around and not from me, but through what God can do for everyone, and I mean everyone.”

More than 270 chaplains have studied at the organization, located at 1730 Weston Rd. near Denison Road East in Weston.

They’re trained to perform various duties such as funerals for low-income families, blessings, counselling for those who have drug, alcohol, gambling and other forms of addictions, baptisms, crisis intervention, youth services, marriages and more.

His organization also networks with other groups to help provide some of those services to its clients, which are of every faith. They also partner with organizations to go into communities and feed the hungry.

”It doesn’t matter to us what their faith is — what matters to us is that if we can help them,” he said. “It’s kind of just showing them as we believe that Jesus did good … he went out into the community and helped people, fed people and prayed, and we’re the same. We believe that all of us should have our own church, our own faith whether it’s a mosque or a temple, whatever it is, but then we have to get out and do the work that the Lord has called us to do.”

As of September, there are 26 people waiting to begin the chaplaincy program. White said that more people are realizing there’s a need in Canadian communities for outreach workers like chaplains.

“It’s important to let people know that they don’t have to have, really, a degree to win souls or to help people,” he said. “They have to have desire and compassion.”

White added he knows the chaplaincy will grow.

“I also feel that I need some of the chaplains … I feel now that we need to bring and look for somebody to bring on board that can take control, because one of the worst things that can happen is you could be so busy and you can’t keep up, so it fails,” he said. “We would rather take the time now to bring in more professionals that are able to do this (manage the organization) … when I pass or when I leave, this ministry will still go on and that’s my legacy.”

Looking back, White is happy he turned to God when he thought his luck ran out.

“God kept his word,” he said. “And I’ve kept mine.”

For more information about The Chaplains Office of Canada, visit www.chaplainsofficeofcanada.com.

ED NOTE: correction was made to the age in the second paragraph and web address.

Toronto chaplain trainer relishes opportunity 'to see lives change'

Patrick White founded The Chaplains Office of Canada

Community Sep 21, 2017 by Aaron D'Andrea York Guardian

Nine years ago, doctors gave Patrick White less than two years to live.

White, who was 65 at the time, had suffered three heart attacks, was diabetic and had several other serious health problems.

His doctors said he was in the final stages of heart failure.

“I never drank or smoked in my life, and I was just ready to go, but also I wasn’t ready to go,” the 74-year-old Weston resident told Metroland Media Toronto. “I can’t even put into words how I felt that it’s over. That’s it … I just accepted it. It became a reality, and I mean, we have all to face death, I know that, but it did become a real reality and that was about it.”

“I enjoy to see lives change. I enjoy to just get out there and do the best I can, but most of all, I thank God that he’s allowing me to stay alive." - Patrick White, founder of The Chaplains Office of Canada

With nowhere left to go and no other options remaining, he felt the desire to talk to God, so he prayed, asking for more time to live and, in return, he vowed he would serve God.

“Things started changing,” he said.

Slowly, he began to feel better, both physically and mentally.

Once he was in better shape, White converted from Judaism to Christianity and switched careers from being a motivational speaker to becoming a chaplain so he could do advocacy and outreach work in his community.

To take his work further, six years ago he founded The Chaplains Office of Canada, where he and other chaplains that he trains from all over Canada continue to serve its clients located all across Ontario.

White runs the organization with money used from his pension and enrolment fees. He also gets help from community members through fundraising.

“People say you can’t be 74,” he said. “I work every day from five or six in the morning to about 11 or 12 (at night), all the time.”

During his time as a chaplain, he said he has seen drug addicts turn their lives around, parents who’ve lost babies recover from depression and many more “miracles.”

“I enjoy to see lives change. I enjoy to just get out there and do the best I can, but most of all, I thank God that he’s allowing me to stay alive,” he said. “I mean, I still have medical problems here every day sometimes, but the thing I enjoy the most is to see people with their lives turning around and not from me, but through what God can do for everyone, and I mean everyone.”

More than 270 chaplains have studied at the organization, located at 1730 Weston Rd. near Denison Road East in Weston.

They’re trained to perform various duties such as funerals for low-income families, blessings, counselling for those who have drug, alcohol, gambling and other forms of addictions, baptisms, crisis intervention, youth services, marriages and more.

His organization also networks with other groups to help provide some of those services to its clients, which are of every faith. They also partner with organizations to go into communities and feed the hungry.

”It doesn’t matter to us what their faith is — what matters to us is that if we can help them,” he said. “It’s kind of just showing them as we believe that Jesus did good … he went out into the community and helped people, fed people and prayed, and we’re the same. We believe that all of us should have our own church, our own faith whether it’s a mosque or a temple, whatever it is, but then we have to get out and do the work that the Lord has called us to do.”

As of September, there are 26 people waiting to begin the chaplaincy program. White said that more people are realizing there’s a need in Canadian communities for outreach workers like chaplains.

“It’s important to let people know that they don’t have to have, really, a degree to win souls or to help people,” he said. “They have to have desire and compassion.”

White added he knows the chaplaincy will grow.

“I also feel that I need some of the chaplains … I feel now that we need to bring and look for somebody to bring on board that can take control, because one of the worst things that can happen is you could be so busy and you can’t keep up, so it fails,” he said. “We would rather take the time now to bring in more professionals that are able to do this (manage the organization) … when I pass or when I leave, this ministry will still go on and that’s my legacy.”

Looking back, White is happy he turned to God when he thought his luck ran out.

“God kept his word,” he said. “And I’ve kept mine.”

For more information about The Chaplains Office of Canada, visit www.chaplainsofficeofcanada.com.

ED NOTE: correction was made to the age in the second paragraph and web address.

Toronto chaplain trainer relishes opportunity 'to see lives change'

Patrick White founded The Chaplains Office of Canada

Community Sep 21, 2017 by Aaron D'Andrea York Guardian

Nine years ago, doctors gave Patrick White less than two years to live.

White, who was 65 at the time, had suffered three heart attacks, was diabetic and had several other serious health problems.

His doctors said he was in the final stages of heart failure.

“I never drank or smoked in my life, and I was just ready to go, but also I wasn’t ready to go,” the 74-year-old Weston resident told Metroland Media Toronto. “I can’t even put into words how I felt that it’s over. That’s it … I just accepted it. It became a reality, and I mean, we have all to face death, I know that, but it did become a real reality and that was about it.”

“I enjoy to see lives change. I enjoy to just get out there and do the best I can, but most of all, I thank God that he’s allowing me to stay alive." - Patrick White, founder of The Chaplains Office of Canada

With nowhere left to go and no other options remaining, he felt the desire to talk to God, so he prayed, asking for more time to live and, in return, he vowed he would serve God.

“Things started changing,” he said.

Slowly, he began to feel better, both physically and mentally.

Once he was in better shape, White converted from Judaism to Christianity and switched careers from being a motivational speaker to becoming a chaplain so he could do advocacy and outreach work in his community.

To take his work further, six years ago he founded The Chaplains Office of Canada, where he and other chaplains that he trains from all over Canada continue to serve its clients located all across Ontario.

White runs the organization with money used from his pension and enrolment fees. He also gets help from community members through fundraising.

“People say you can’t be 74,” he said. “I work every day from five or six in the morning to about 11 or 12 (at night), all the time.”

During his time as a chaplain, he said he has seen drug addicts turn their lives around, parents who’ve lost babies recover from depression and many more “miracles.”

“I enjoy to see lives change. I enjoy to just get out there and do the best I can, but most of all, I thank God that he’s allowing me to stay alive,” he said. “I mean, I still have medical problems here every day sometimes, but the thing I enjoy the most is to see people with their lives turning around and not from me, but through what God can do for everyone, and I mean everyone.”

More than 270 chaplains have studied at the organization, located at 1730 Weston Rd. near Denison Road East in Weston.

They’re trained to perform various duties such as funerals for low-income families, blessings, counselling for those who have drug, alcohol, gambling and other forms of addictions, baptisms, crisis intervention, youth services, marriages and more.

His organization also networks with other groups to help provide some of those services to its clients, which are of every faith. They also partner with organizations to go into communities and feed the hungry.

”It doesn’t matter to us what their faith is — what matters to us is that if we can help them,” he said. “It’s kind of just showing them as we believe that Jesus did good … he went out into the community and helped people, fed people and prayed, and we’re the same. We believe that all of us should have our own church, our own faith whether it’s a mosque or a temple, whatever it is, but then we have to get out and do the work that the Lord has called us to do.”

As of September, there are 26 people waiting to begin the chaplaincy program. White said that more people are realizing there’s a need in Canadian communities for outreach workers like chaplains.

“It’s important to let people know that they don’t have to have, really, a degree to win souls or to help people,” he said. “They have to have desire and compassion.”

White added he knows the chaplaincy will grow.

“I also feel that I need some of the chaplains … I feel now that we need to bring and look for somebody to bring on board that can take control, because one of the worst things that can happen is you could be so busy and you can’t keep up, so it fails,” he said. “We would rather take the time now to bring in more professionals that are able to do this (manage the organization) … when I pass or when I leave, this ministry will still go on and that’s my legacy.”

Looking back, White is happy he turned to God when he thought his luck ran out.

“God kept his word,” he said. “And I’ve kept mine.”

For more information about The Chaplains Office of Canada, visit www.chaplainsofficeofcanada.com.

ED NOTE: correction was made to the age in the second paragraph and web address.