Scarborough councillors vote to protect Agincourt's Harris-White House

Community Sep 11, 2017 Scarborough Mirror

Scarborough councillors have voted to protect an Agincourt farmhouse which was once home to the first Black Canadian to run for federal office.

Built in 1888 and known as the Harris-White House, the one-and-a-half-storey structure at 33 Murray Ave. is already on the City of Toronto’s Heritage Register.

Scarborough Community Council on Sept. 6 agreed the house should be designated under the Ontario Heritage Act, as the city’s preservation board recommends.

Toronto Council must confirm the decision.

Built by the Kennedy family, the house was part of the Village of Agincourt. John Harris farmed the property, subdivided around 1950, from 1912 until 1943.

From 1951, the house with a veranda, T-shaped plan, steep gable roofs, and decorative brick patterning was owned by Vivian (Keeler) White and her husband Bill White, who died in 1981.

Bill White, a grandson of Virginia slaves, ran for the Cooperative Commonwealth Federation, now the New Democratic Party, in Toronto in 1949 and was later named Officer of the Order of Canada.

Vivian White, who died last year and was a well-known environmentalist and community volunteer, wanted long-term recognition and protection for the property, the board was told.

The Whites raised five children in the house, southwest of Sheppard Avenue and Brimley Road.

Scarborough councillors vote to protect Agincourt's Harris-White House

Former owner was first Black Canadian to run for MP

Community Sep 11, 2017 Scarborough Mirror

Scarborough councillors have voted to protect an Agincourt farmhouse which was once home to the first Black Canadian to run for federal office.

Built in 1888 and known as the Harris-White House, the one-and-a-half-storey structure at 33 Murray Ave. is already on the City of Toronto’s Heritage Register.

Scarborough Community Council on Sept. 6 agreed the house should be designated under the Ontario Heritage Act, as the city’s preservation board recommends.

Toronto Council must confirm the decision.

Related Content

Built by the Kennedy family, the house was part of the Village of Agincourt. John Harris farmed the property, subdivided around 1950, from 1912 until 1943.

From 1951, the house with a veranda, T-shaped plan, steep gable roofs, and decorative brick patterning was owned by Vivian (Keeler) White and her husband Bill White, who died in 1981.

Bill White, a grandson of Virginia slaves, ran for the Cooperative Commonwealth Federation, now the New Democratic Party, in Toronto in 1949 and was later named Officer of the Order of Canada.

Vivian White, who died last year and was a well-known environmentalist and community volunteer, wanted long-term recognition and protection for the property, the board was told.

The Whites raised five children in the house, southwest of Sheppard Avenue and Brimley Road.

Scarborough councillors vote to protect Agincourt's Harris-White House

Former owner was first Black Canadian to run for MP

Community Sep 11, 2017 Scarborough Mirror

Scarborough councillors have voted to protect an Agincourt farmhouse which was once home to the first Black Canadian to run for federal office.

Built in 1888 and known as the Harris-White House, the one-and-a-half-storey structure at 33 Murray Ave. is already on the City of Toronto’s Heritage Register.

Scarborough Community Council on Sept. 6 agreed the house should be designated under the Ontario Heritage Act, as the city’s preservation board recommends.

Toronto Council must confirm the decision.

Related Content

Built by the Kennedy family, the house was part of the Village of Agincourt. John Harris farmed the property, subdivided around 1950, from 1912 until 1943.

From 1951, the house with a veranda, T-shaped plan, steep gable roofs, and decorative brick patterning was owned by Vivian (Keeler) White and her husband Bill White, who died in 1981.

Bill White, a grandson of Virginia slaves, ran for the Cooperative Commonwealth Federation, now the New Democratic Party, in Toronto in 1949 and was later named Officer of the Order of Canada.

Vivian White, who died last year and was a well-known environmentalist and community volunteer, wanted long-term recognition and protection for the property, the board was told.

The Whites raised five children in the house, southwest of Sheppard Avenue and Brimley Road.