Wall outside Chester Le becoming home to mural art after a 'bad year'

Community Sep 05, 2017 by Mike Adler Scarborough Mirror

The long wall separating Chester Le townhouse complex from Victoria Park Avenue was blank for decades.

Not anymore.

Artists inspired by youth of the Toronto Community Housing community are painting scenes on sections of the wall, which stretches for blocks north of Finch Avenue.

“They wanted something they could be proud of,” Adrian Hayles, a muralist working with a grant from StreetArt Toronto, said last week.

The work, to be unveiled at noon on Sept. 30, follows a “particularly hard year” for Chester Le, said Lee Soda, executive director of Agincourt Community Services Association (ACSA).

Samatar Farah, 24, was shot dead in the complex in April, two days after another incident in which three other people were wounded there by gunfire.

Toronto police later suggested Farah had nothing to do with violence, but was targeted simply because he lived in Chester Le.

Soda said the mural was a way to highlight positive aspects of life in Chester Le.

The complex is given a “negative connotation” by outsiders, but there’s much potential there, said ACSA worker Raeetha Raveendranathan, adding Bennita Mensah, Thomas Braendel, Shuley Mohammed, Zakaria Abdi and Randy Pyne — youth involved with the mural — want it to reflect the real community.

Wall outside Chester Le becoming home to mural art after a 'bad year'

Housing complex in Scarborough scene of shootings this year

Community Sep 05, 2017 by Mike Adler Scarborough Mirror

The long wall separating Chester Le townhouse complex from Victoria Park Avenue was blank for decades.

Not anymore.

Artists inspired by youth of the Toronto Community Housing community are painting scenes on sections of the wall, which stretches for blocks north of Finch Avenue.

“They wanted something they could be proud of,” Adrian Hayles, a muralist working with a grant from StreetArt Toronto, said last week.

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The work, to be unveiled at noon on Sept. 30, follows a “particularly hard year” for Chester Le, said Lee Soda, executive director of Agincourt Community Services Association (ACSA).

Samatar Farah, 24, was shot dead in the complex in April, two days after another incident in which three other people were wounded there by gunfire.

Toronto police later suggested Farah had nothing to do with violence, but was targeted simply because he lived in Chester Le.

Soda said the mural was a way to highlight positive aspects of life in Chester Le.

The complex is given a “negative connotation” by outsiders, but there’s much potential there, said ACSA worker Raeetha Raveendranathan, adding Bennita Mensah, Thomas Braendel, Shuley Mohammed, Zakaria Abdi and Randy Pyne — youth involved with the mural — want it to reflect the real community.

Wall outside Chester Le becoming home to mural art after a 'bad year'

Housing complex in Scarborough scene of shootings this year

Community Sep 05, 2017 by Mike Adler Scarborough Mirror

The long wall separating Chester Le townhouse complex from Victoria Park Avenue was blank for decades.

Not anymore.

Artists inspired by youth of the Toronto Community Housing community are painting scenes on sections of the wall, which stretches for blocks north of Finch Avenue.

“They wanted something they could be proud of,” Adrian Hayles, a muralist working with a grant from StreetArt Toronto, said last week.

Related Content

The work, to be unveiled at noon on Sept. 30, follows a “particularly hard year” for Chester Le, said Lee Soda, executive director of Agincourt Community Services Association (ACSA).

Samatar Farah, 24, was shot dead in the complex in April, two days after another incident in which three other people were wounded there by gunfire.

Toronto police later suggested Farah had nothing to do with violence, but was targeted simply because he lived in Chester Le.

Soda said the mural was a way to highlight positive aspects of life in Chester Le.

The complex is given a “negative connotation” by outsiders, but there’s much potential there, said ACSA worker Raeetha Raveendranathan, adding Bennita Mensah, Thomas Braendel, Shuley Mohammed, Zakaria Abdi and Randy Pyne — youth involved with the mural — want it to reflect the real community.