Spiritual group funds Etobicoke women's shelter's drop-in

Community Jul 19, 2017 Etobicoke Guardian

An international spiritual community will fund a south Etobicoke women’s shelter’s community drop-in program for the next year.

Women’s Habitat drop-in programs focus on life skills development, parenting and housing support and harm reduction, and other issues.

The $12,000 donation from the group, which calls itself the Modern Mystery School, will fund meals, basic need items and program supplies, and cover transportation costs for program participants, many of whom are experiencing low depths of poverty, shelter officials reported.

The donation means shelter officials won’t be forced to choose between providing meals or TTC tokens, said Silvia Samsa, Women’s Habitat’s executive director.

It’s an annual struggle to secure funding for the program, she said.

“The drop-in model provides women the support they need when they are experiencing violence and poverty,” Samsa said in a statement.

“We are able to offer them a safe space that is free of judgment, connects them to other women and to our team of dedicated trauma counsellors. These programs are designed to break the social isolation survivors of violence often face and facilitate the opportunity to reconnect with community.”

Last year, the program hosted 86 drop-in sessions attended by more than 1,000 participants.

Spiritual group funds Etobicoke women's shelter's drop-in

Community Jul 19, 2017 Etobicoke Guardian

An international spiritual community will fund a south Etobicoke women’s shelter’s community drop-in program for the next year.

Women’s Habitat drop-in programs focus on life skills development, parenting and housing support and harm reduction, and other issues.

The $12,000 donation from the group, which calls itself the Modern Mystery School, will fund meals, basic need items and program supplies, and cover transportation costs for program participants, many of whom are experiencing low depths of poverty, shelter officials reported.

The donation means shelter officials won’t be forced to choose between providing meals or TTC tokens, said Silvia Samsa, Women’s Habitat’s executive director.

It’s an annual struggle to secure funding for the program, she said.

“The drop-in model provides women the support they need when they are experiencing violence and poverty,” Samsa said in a statement.

“We are able to offer them a safe space that is free of judgment, connects them to other women and to our team of dedicated trauma counsellors. These programs are designed to break the social isolation survivors of violence often face and facilitate the opportunity to reconnect with community.”

Last year, the program hosted 86 drop-in sessions attended by more than 1,000 participants.

Spiritual group funds Etobicoke women's shelter's drop-in

Community Jul 19, 2017 Etobicoke Guardian

An international spiritual community will fund a south Etobicoke women’s shelter’s community drop-in program for the next year.

Women’s Habitat drop-in programs focus on life skills development, parenting and housing support and harm reduction, and other issues.

The $12,000 donation from the group, which calls itself the Modern Mystery School, will fund meals, basic need items and program supplies, and cover transportation costs for program participants, many of whom are experiencing low depths of poverty, shelter officials reported.

The donation means shelter officials won’t be forced to choose between providing meals or TTC tokens, said Silvia Samsa, Women’s Habitat’s executive director.

It’s an annual struggle to secure funding for the program, she said.

“The drop-in model provides women the support they need when they are experiencing violence and poverty,” Samsa said in a statement.

“We are able to offer them a safe space that is free of judgment, connects them to other women and to our team of dedicated trauma counsellors. These programs are designed to break the social isolation survivors of violence often face and facilitate the opportunity to reconnect with community.”

Last year, the program hosted 86 drop-in sessions attended by more than 1,000 participants.