Etobicoke Humane Society rescues 68 hoarded cats from Scarborough apartment

Community Jun 09, 2017 by Cynthia Reason Etobicoke Guardian

When Becca Gordon first laid eyes on Arnold, he was lying calmly on a towel on the floor of a two-bedroom Scarborough apartment, while his brother and sister cats – more than 70 of them in total – scurried about all around him.

As the cat care co-ordinator for the Etobicoke Humane Society (EHS), Gordon and three other volunteers were summoned to the apartment on May 25 after receiving a request for help from an elderly couple facing eviction due to their large brood of feline companions.

“All of the other cats were running around – some curious, some scared and scurrying – but Arnold was just laying there,” Gordon recalled.

“One of the other volunteers pointed him out and said she thought there might be something wrong with him; that his leg looked bent. So I went up to him and picked him up. He didn’t cry out, he was just quiet and very sweet.”

It wasn’t until Gordon and the EHS team got Arnold to a vet that they discovered his front right leg was fractured and required surgery to insert a plate.

Luckily, Arnold’s leg was the worst of the ailments suffered by the total of 68 cats Gordon and her fellow EHS volunteers removed from that Scarborough cat hoarding case over the course of three days late last month.

Most, if not all, of those rescued cats have now received initial treatment for various respiratory, eye and ear infections at the South Etobicoke Animal Hospital and have been placed in foster homes.

Arnold is the lone cat among the 39 EHS took into its care currently residing at the charity’s shelter on Six Point Road. There, nursing a postsurgery paw cast and eye infection, he will enjoy a large cage to himself while he takes the next two weeks to recover.

EHS Interim President Roma DeLonghi said that, while taxing, the whole experience of rescuing Arnold and his sibling cats has also been a rewarding one.

“It’s what rescue organizations are all about, really. And the response from our volunteers, fosters, and the donor community was amazing,” she said, noting that while the Burlington Humane Society and Ninth Life Cat Rescue stepped up to take on the remaining 29 rescue cats, the Eric S. Margolis Family Foundation made an “extraordinarily generous” donation to help cover costs.

“It was really heartening how quickly people come together for a common, good cause. We received an outpouring of support in response and we’re very grateful.”

Still, DeLonghi said the estimated vet bills and care costs for the rescued cats will easily fall in the tens of thousands of dollars.

“The initial vet appointments were just the starting point, where each of the cats was dewormed, received flea treatment, were tested FIV or feline leukemia, given their vaccinations, and checked if they need to be spayed or neutered,” Gordon added.

From those initial checkups, it was discovered that at least 11 of the cats were pregnant, while some others will require dental work and tooth removals, and still others will have to have ears removed due to self-inflicted scratching injuries caused my ear mites — all costly treatments.

To support EHS in caring for its newly rescued cats, Gordon said there are several ways people help:

– To cover some of the costs associated with the cats’ medical care, the all-volunteer charity shelter – which does not receive any government funding – has launched a Canada Helps fundraising campaign. To donate, go to http://bit.ly/2rR0Lz9

– Supporters are also urged to register for EHS’s upcoming Leashes in the Park event – a 2-km Walk-a-thon and Pet Festival fundraiser set to take place at West Deane Park (on Martin Grove Road north of Rathburn Road) on Saturday, June 17 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

In addition to the walk-a-thon, Leashes in the Park will also feature demonstrations by pet behaviour experts, petography, a kids’ craft corner and face-painting, an appearance by the Toronto Police K9 Unit, pet-friendly vendors, raffle prizes and a barbecue and refreshments. All proceeds from the event go directly back to animal care and programming at EHS. To register or for more information, go to www.etobicokehumanesociety.com

– And last, but not least, EHS is also appealing to anyone willing to take in any of these “very sweet” cats – either as their foster or forever families.

“All of them are really affectionate and sweet,” Gordon said, noting that each of the cats’ adoption profiles are being slowly uploaded to the EHS cat adoption site at http://etobicokehumanesociety.com/cats/

“They’re all well socialized, which is insane to us, because when you go into a place like that with that many cats, you expect them to be good with other cats, not necessarily with people – but they’re all so wonderful and really deserve loving forever homes.”


Etobicoke Humane Society rescues 68 hoarded cats from Scarborough apartment

Community Jun 09, 2017 by Cynthia Reason Etobicoke Guardian

When Becca Gordon first laid eyes on Arnold, he was lying calmly on a towel on the floor of a two-bedroom Scarborough apartment, while his brother and sister cats – more than 70 of them in total – scurried about all around him.

As the cat care co-ordinator for the Etobicoke Humane Society (EHS), Gordon and three other volunteers were summoned to the apartment on May 25 after receiving a request for help from an elderly couple facing eviction due to their large brood of feline companions.

“All of the other cats were running around – some curious, some scared and scurrying – but Arnold was just laying there,” Gordon recalled.

“One of the other volunteers pointed him out and said she thought there might be something wrong with him; that his leg looked bent. So I went up to him and picked him up. He didn’t cry out, he was just quiet and very sweet.”

It wasn’t until Gordon and the EHS team got Arnold to a vet that they discovered his front right leg was fractured and required surgery to insert a plate.

Luckily, Arnold’s leg was the worst of the ailments suffered by the total of 68 cats Gordon and her fellow EHS volunteers removed from that Scarborough cat hoarding case over the course of three days late last month.

Most, if not all, of those rescued cats have now received initial treatment for various respiratory, eye and ear infections at the South Etobicoke Animal Hospital and have been placed in foster homes.

Arnold is the lone cat among the 39 EHS took into its care currently residing at the charity’s shelter on Six Point Road. There, nursing a postsurgery paw cast and eye infection, he will enjoy a large cage to himself while he takes the next two weeks to recover.

EHS Interim President Roma DeLonghi said that, while taxing, the whole experience of rescuing Arnold and his sibling cats has also been a rewarding one.

“It’s what rescue organizations are all about, really. And the response from our volunteers, fosters, and the donor community was amazing,” she said, noting that while the Burlington Humane Society and Ninth Life Cat Rescue stepped up to take on the remaining 29 rescue cats, the Eric S. Margolis Family Foundation made an “extraordinarily generous” donation to help cover costs.

“It was really heartening how quickly people come together for a common, good cause. We received an outpouring of support in response and we’re very grateful.”

Still, DeLonghi said the estimated vet bills and care costs for the rescued cats will easily fall in the tens of thousands of dollars.

“The initial vet appointments were just the starting point, where each of the cats was dewormed, received flea treatment, were tested FIV or feline leukemia, given their vaccinations, and checked if they need to be spayed or neutered,” Gordon added.

From those initial checkups, it was discovered that at least 11 of the cats were pregnant, while some others will require dental work and tooth removals, and still others will have to have ears removed due to self-inflicted scratching injuries caused my ear mites — all costly treatments.

To support EHS in caring for its newly rescued cats, Gordon said there are several ways people help:

– To cover some of the costs associated with the cats’ medical care, the all-volunteer charity shelter – which does not receive any government funding – has launched a Canada Helps fundraising campaign. To donate, go to http://bit.ly/2rR0Lz9

– Supporters are also urged to register for EHS’s upcoming Leashes in the Park event – a 2-km Walk-a-thon and Pet Festival fundraiser set to take place at West Deane Park (on Martin Grove Road north of Rathburn Road) on Saturday, June 17 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

In addition to the walk-a-thon, Leashes in the Park will also feature demonstrations by pet behaviour experts, petography, a kids’ craft corner and face-painting, an appearance by the Toronto Police K9 Unit, pet-friendly vendors, raffle prizes and a barbecue and refreshments. All proceeds from the event go directly back to animal care and programming at EHS. To register or for more information, go to www.etobicokehumanesociety.com

– And last, but not least, EHS is also appealing to anyone willing to take in any of these “very sweet” cats – either as their foster or forever families.

“All of them are really affectionate and sweet,” Gordon said, noting that each of the cats’ adoption profiles are being slowly uploaded to the EHS cat adoption site at http://etobicokehumanesociety.com/cats/

“They’re all well socialized, which is insane to us, because when you go into a place like that with that many cats, you expect them to be good with other cats, not necessarily with people – but they’re all so wonderful and really deserve loving forever homes.”


Etobicoke Humane Society rescues 68 hoarded cats from Scarborough apartment

Community Jun 09, 2017 by Cynthia Reason Etobicoke Guardian

When Becca Gordon first laid eyes on Arnold, he was lying calmly on a towel on the floor of a two-bedroom Scarborough apartment, while his brother and sister cats – more than 70 of them in total – scurried about all around him.

As the cat care co-ordinator for the Etobicoke Humane Society (EHS), Gordon and three other volunteers were summoned to the apartment on May 25 after receiving a request for help from an elderly couple facing eviction due to their large brood of feline companions.

“All of the other cats were running around – some curious, some scared and scurrying – but Arnold was just laying there,” Gordon recalled.

“One of the other volunteers pointed him out and said she thought there might be something wrong with him; that his leg looked bent. So I went up to him and picked him up. He didn’t cry out, he was just quiet and very sweet.”

It wasn’t until Gordon and the EHS team got Arnold to a vet that they discovered his front right leg was fractured and required surgery to insert a plate.

Luckily, Arnold’s leg was the worst of the ailments suffered by the total of 68 cats Gordon and her fellow EHS volunteers removed from that Scarborough cat hoarding case over the course of three days late last month.

Most, if not all, of those rescued cats have now received initial treatment for various respiratory, eye and ear infections at the South Etobicoke Animal Hospital and have been placed in foster homes.

Arnold is the lone cat among the 39 EHS took into its care currently residing at the charity’s shelter on Six Point Road. There, nursing a postsurgery paw cast and eye infection, he will enjoy a large cage to himself while he takes the next two weeks to recover.

EHS Interim President Roma DeLonghi said that, while taxing, the whole experience of rescuing Arnold and his sibling cats has also been a rewarding one.

“It’s what rescue organizations are all about, really. And the response from our volunteers, fosters, and the donor community was amazing,” she said, noting that while the Burlington Humane Society and Ninth Life Cat Rescue stepped up to take on the remaining 29 rescue cats, the Eric S. Margolis Family Foundation made an “extraordinarily generous” donation to help cover costs.

“It was really heartening how quickly people come together for a common, good cause. We received an outpouring of support in response and we’re very grateful.”

Still, DeLonghi said the estimated vet bills and care costs for the rescued cats will easily fall in the tens of thousands of dollars.

“The initial vet appointments were just the starting point, where each of the cats was dewormed, received flea treatment, were tested FIV or feline leukemia, given their vaccinations, and checked if they need to be spayed or neutered,” Gordon added.

From those initial checkups, it was discovered that at least 11 of the cats were pregnant, while some others will require dental work and tooth removals, and still others will have to have ears removed due to self-inflicted scratching injuries caused my ear mites — all costly treatments.

To support EHS in caring for its newly rescued cats, Gordon said there are several ways people help:

– To cover some of the costs associated with the cats’ medical care, the all-volunteer charity shelter – which does not receive any government funding – has launched a Canada Helps fundraising campaign. To donate, go to http://bit.ly/2rR0Lz9

– Supporters are also urged to register for EHS’s upcoming Leashes in the Park event – a 2-km Walk-a-thon and Pet Festival fundraiser set to take place at West Deane Park (on Martin Grove Road north of Rathburn Road) on Saturday, June 17 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

In addition to the walk-a-thon, Leashes in the Park will also feature demonstrations by pet behaviour experts, petography, a kids’ craft corner and face-painting, an appearance by the Toronto Police K9 Unit, pet-friendly vendors, raffle prizes and a barbecue and refreshments. All proceeds from the event go directly back to animal care and programming at EHS. To register or for more information, go to www.etobicokehumanesociety.com

– And last, but not least, EHS is also appealing to anyone willing to take in any of these “very sweet” cats – either as their foster or forever families.

“All of them are really affectionate and sweet,” Gordon said, noting that each of the cats’ adoption profiles are being slowly uploaded to the EHS cat adoption site at http://etobicokehumanesociety.com/cats/

“They’re all well socialized, which is insane to us, because when you go into a place like that with that many cats, you expect them to be good with other cats, not necessarily with people – but they’re all so wonderful and really deserve loving forever homes.”