Program funding for homeless youth announced at York University

Community May 01, 2017 North York Mirror

A multimillion-dollar program investment to help homeless youth get back on their feet was announced at York University Tuesday, April 25.

The $7.9-million funding was made to A Way Home: Working Together to End Youth Homelessness.

The funding will help youth in Ontario and Alberta who are homeless − or at risk of becoming homeless − to get education, job skills and work experience.

The project will be delivered through a partnership between coalition partners on homelessness prevention, including A Way Home Canada, along with the provinces of Ontario and Alberta.

In the first two years of the project, demonstration projects will take place in 10 Canadian cities, including Toronto.

The Canadian Observatory on Homelessness at York University will launch a youth homelessness social innovation lab to oversee the demonstration projects and develop tools and resources to help other communities do similar projects. York will receive $1.45 million of the federal funding to run the lab.

Joe Roberts started pushing a shopping cart across Canada in May 2016 to raise awareness and money to end youth homelessness.

The former addict started the Push for Change campaign and has walked some 6,600 kilometres.

“Our campaign acts as a catalyst to create small acts of kindness,” he said.

 

Program funding for homeless youth announced at York University

Will help homeless youth get back on feet

Community May 01, 2017 North York Mirror

A multimillion-dollar program investment to help homeless youth get back on their feet was announced at York University Tuesday, April 25.

The $7.9-million funding was made to A Way Home: Working Together to End Youth Homelessness.

The funding will help youth in Ontario and Alberta who are homeless − or at risk of becoming homeless − to get education, job skills and work experience.

The project will be delivered through a partnership between coalition partners on homelessness prevention, including A Way Home Canada, along with the provinces of Ontario and Alberta.

In the first two years of the project, demonstration projects will take place in 10 Canadian cities, including Toronto.

The Canadian Observatory on Homelessness at York University will launch a youth homelessness social innovation lab to oversee the demonstration projects and develop tools and resources to help other communities do similar projects. York will receive $1.45 million of the federal funding to run the lab.

Joe Roberts started pushing a shopping cart across Canada in May 2016 to raise awareness and money to end youth homelessness.

The former addict started the Push for Change campaign and has walked some 6,600 kilometres.

“Our campaign acts as a catalyst to create small acts of kindness,” he said.

 

Program funding for homeless youth announced at York University

Will help homeless youth get back on feet

Community May 01, 2017 North York Mirror

A multimillion-dollar program investment to help homeless youth get back on their feet was announced at York University Tuesday, April 25.

The $7.9-million funding was made to A Way Home: Working Together to End Youth Homelessness.

The funding will help youth in Ontario and Alberta who are homeless − or at risk of becoming homeless − to get education, job skills and work experience.

The project will be delivered through a partnership between coalition partners on homelessness prevention, including A Way Home Canada, along with the provinces of Ontario and Alberta.

In the first two years of the project, demonstration projects will take place in 10 Canadian cities, including Toronto.

The Canadian Observatory on Homelessness at York University will launch a youth homelessness social innovation lab to oversee the demonstration projects and develop tools and resources to help other communities do similar projects. York will receive $1.45 million of the federal funding to run the lab.

Joe Roberts started pushing a shopping cart across Canada in May 2016 to raise awareness and money to end youth homelessness.

The former addict started the Push for Change campaign and has walked some 6,600 kilometres.

“Our campaign acts as a catalyst to create small acts of kindness,” he said.