TSO and Tafelmusik's exclusive clubs attract young audiences

Community May 11, 2017 by Jasmine Hui Bloor West Villager

Classical music has been around for decades and orchestras in Toronto are making sure it stays relevant with not only older audiences, but younger ones as well.

While new music is constantly being released, younger generations are still listening to classical pieces from composers such as Mozart and Rachmaninoff.

What’s pulling younger audiences in and making them the new listeners to classical music?

Toronto Symphony Orchestra (TSO) and Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra believe they've found the formula by offering exclusive events and discounts to its concerts.

“I wish more people were aware that these are concerts that are out there,” said Grace Egan, memmber of TSO’s TSOUNDCHECK and Tafelmusik’s Tafelscene.

“A lot of the belief is that classical music is playing the same pieces, but, there are more unusual composers, pieces you haven’t heard before that you get to experience for the first time. It’s also not expensive; the tickets are reasonable.”

Since 2001, TSO has offered its exclusive program, TSOUNDCHECK, to audiences between the ages of 15 and 35 that provide concert tickets for less than $20.

Tafelmusik started a similar club called Tafelscene in 2013 that offers discounted prices on concert tickets to audiences 35 and under.

William Norris, Managing Director of Tafelmusik, said Tafelscene was created to make attending concerts more accessible to younger audiences who have less time and money to spend than older generations.

“The music you play, it should be the same music and the same quality for whatever concert it is,” Norris said. “It’s just about being inventive about how we present it and thinking of the audience’s point-of-view.”

Norris said adapting to different musical tastes and changing the way classical music is perceived is also important to attracting a younger generation.

Last year, Tafelmusik launched its event called Haus Musik, which they describe as ‘the classical alternative’.

It was created for audiences who prefer a more experimental performance concept and do not want to attend a traditional two-hour performance.

“It’s standing and there’s really interesting directors, young and up-and-coming music directors in Toronto,” Norris said. “We worked with them to reimagine how we present concerts, so it’s not just a white back and a blank stage, but more of an immersive experience. When you walk into the venue, you’re inside the performance.”   

While Tafelmusik focused on performance with Haus Musik, TSO wanted to offer more social opportunities to young adults by creating its Impresarios Club.

This club allows audiences in their 20s to 30s donate an annual fee to TSO and receive access to exclusive events and offers.

Egan said the Impresarios Club’s Salon events were enjoyable because the audiences are not separated from the performers with a stage.

“It’s similar to Tafelmusik’s bar concerts, where you’re really consuming the music the way people used to consume it and the way that it’s meant to be consumed,” Egan said. “It’s lovelier that way.”

TSO’s vice-president of marketing David Postill said the Impresarios Club was created to show a different twist to how music is presented.

“It allows them to talk to musicians and sometimes listen to a short piece,” Postill said. “The club enhances the social aspect of music and allows audiences to celebrate it.”

Egan said these new initiatives are experiencing popularity with younger attendees because traditional performances can feel like a university lecture hall.

“In comparison, a seminar class; it’s a more effective way of learning in a smaller scale,” Egan said. “With music, it’s a more effective way of communing with it, seeing its beauty, being involved in it and getting consumed by it.”

TSO has also been expanding its reach to schools with its educational music programs, including: school concerts, open rehearsals and teacher resources.

“Public schools are not as strong with music as it used to be,” Postill said. “We want to build the next audience by getting them excited and interested in music.”

With younger generations becoming the new audience to classical music, Postill said they need to meet these demands and adapt to the new changes and requests they present.

“Younger audiences are demanding more electronic ways to interact with the concerts,” Postill said. “We just have to be more flexible and adaptive to this.”

Although an older audience still dominates the seats of the concerts, Tafelmusik and TSO are seeing an increase of youth and young adults that are joining its club and attending its performances.

Norris said classical music will always have an audience, because the music is definitely not the problem.

“We need to think about different ways in which we can present what we do,” Norris said, “The music has lasted for 300, 400 years and could easily last for more. We have to respond to people’s changing tastes and how they want to enjoy music.”

TSO and Tafelmusik's exclusive clubs attract young audiences

Club member says these initiatives create new experiences

Community May 11, 2017 by Jasmine Hui Bloor West Villager

Classical music has been around for decades and orchestras in Toronto are making sure it stays relevant with not only older audiences, but younger ones as well.

While new music is constantly being released, younger generations are still listening to classical pieces from composers such as Mozart and Rachmaninoff.

What’s pulling younger audiences in and making them the new listeners to classical music?

Toronto Symphony Orchestra (TSO) and Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra believe they've found the formula by offering exclusive events and discounts to its concerts.

“I wish more people were aware that these are concerts that are out there,” said Grace Egan, memmber of TSO’s TSOUNDCHECK and Tafelmusik’s Tafelscene.

“A lot of the belief is that classical music is playing the same pieces, but, there are more unusual composers, pieces you haven’t heard before that you get to experience for the first time. It’s also not expensive; the tickets are reasonable.”

Since 2001, TSO has offered its exclusive program, TSOUNDCHECK, to audiences between the ages of 15 and 35 that provide concert tickets for less than $20.

Tafelmusik started a similar club called Tafelscene in 2013 that offers discounted prices on concert tickets to audiences 35 and under.

William Norris, Managing Director of Tafelmusik, said Tafelscene was created to make attending concerts more accessible to younger audiences who have less time and money to spend than older generations.

“The music you play, it should be the same music and the same quality for whatever concert it is,” Norris said. “It’s just about being inventive about how we present it and thinking of the audience’s point-of-view.”

Norris said adapting to different musical tastes and changing the way classical music is perceived is also important to attracting a younger generation.

Last year, Tafelmusik launched its event called Haus Musik, which they describe as ‘the classical alternative’.

It was created for audiences who prefer a more experimental performance concept and do not want to attend a traditional two-hour performance.

“It’s standing and there’s really interesting directors, young and up-and-coming music directors in Toronto,” Norris said. “We worked with them to reimagine how we present concerts, so it’s not just a white back and a blank stage, but more of an immersive experience. When you walk into the venue, you’re inside the performance.”   

While Tafelmusik focused on performance with Haus Musik, TSO wanted to offer more social opportunities to young adults by creating its Impresarios Club.

This club allows audiences in their 20s to 30s donate an annual fee to TSO and receive access to exclusive events and offers.

Egan said the Impresarios Club’s Salon events were enjoyable because the audiences are not separated from the performers with a stage.

“It’s similar to Tafelmusik’s bar concerts, where you’re really consuming the music the way people used to consume it and the way that it’s meant to be consumed,” Egan said. “It’s lovelier that way.”

TSO’s vice-president of marketing David Postill said the Impresarios Club was created to show a different twist to how music is presented.

“It allows them to talk to musicians and sometimes listen to a short piece,” Postill said. “The club enhances the social aspect of music and allows audiences to celebrate it.”

Egan said these new initiatives are experiencing popularity with younger attendees because traditional performances can feel like a university lecture hall.

“In comparison, a seminar class; it’s a more effective way of learning in a smaller scale,” Egan said. “With music, it’s a more effective way of communing with it, seeing its beauty, being involved in it and getting consumed by it.”

TSO has also been expanding its reach to schools with its educational music programs, including: school concerts, open rehearsals and teacher resources.

“Public schools are not as strong with music as it used to be,” Postill said. “We want to build the next audience by getting them excited and interested in music.”

With younger generations becoming the new audience to classical music, Postill said they need to meet these demands and adapt to the new changes and requests they present.

“Younger audiences are demanding more electronic ways to interact with the concerts,” Postill said. “We just have to be more flexible and adaptive to this.”

Although an older audience still dominates the seats of the concerts, Tafelmusik and TSO are seeing an increase of youth and young adults that are joining its club and attending its performances.

Norris said classical music will always have an audience, because the music is definitely not the problem.

“We need to think about different ways in which we can present what we do,” Norris said, “The music has lasted for 300, 400 years and could easily last for more. We have to respond to people’s changing tastes and how they want to enjoy music.”

TSO and Tafelmusik's exclusive clubs attract young audiences

Club member says these initiatives create new experiences

Community May 11, 2017 by Jasmine Hui Bloor West Villager

Classical music has been around for decades and orchestras in Toronto are making sure it stays relevant with not only older audiences, but younger ones as well.

While new music is constantly being released, younger generations are still listening to classical pieces from composers such as Mozart and Rachmaninoff.

What’s pulling younger audiences in and making them the new listeners to classical music?

Toronto Symphony Orchestra (TSO) and Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra believe they've found the formula by offering exclusive events and discounts to its concerts.

“I wish more people were aware that these are concerts that are out there,” said Grace Egan, memmber of TSO’s TSOUNDCHECK and Tafelmusik’s Tafelscene.

“A lot of the belief is that classical music is playing the same pieces, but, there are more unusual composers, pieces you haven’t heard before that you get to experience for the first time. It’s also not expensive; the tickets are reasonable.”

Since 2001, TSO has offered its exclusive program, TSOUNDCHECK, to audiences between the ages of 15 and 35 that provide concert tickets for less than $20.

Tafelmusik started a similar club called Tafelscene in 2013 that offers discounted prices on concert tickets to audiences 35 and under.

William Norris, Managing Director of Tafelmusik, said Tafelscene was created to make attending concerts more accessible to younger audiences who have less time and money to spend than older generations.

“The music you play, it should be the same music and the same quality for whatever concert it is,” Norris said. “It’s just about being inventive about how we present it and thinking of the audience’s point-of-view.”

Norris said adapting to different musical tastes and changing the way classical music is perceived is also important to attracting a younger generation.

Last year, Tafelmusik launched its event called Haus Musik, which they describe as ‘the classical alternative’.

It was created for audiences who prefer a more experimental performance concept and do not want to attend a traditional two-hour performance.

“It’s standing and there’s really interesting directors, young and up-and-coming music directors in Toronto,” Norris said. “We worked with them to reimagine how we present concerts, so it’s not just a white back and a blank stage, but more of an immersive experience. When you walk into the venue, you’re inside the performance.”   

While Tafelmusik focused on performance with Haus Musik, TSO wanted to offer more social opportunities to young adults by creating its Impresarios Club.

This club allows audiences in their 20s to 30s donate an annual fee to TSO and receive access to exclusive events and offers.

Egan said the Impresarios Club’s Salon events were enjoyable because the audiences are not separated from the performers with a stage.

“It’s similar to Tafelmusik’s bar concerts, where you’re really consuming the music the way people used to consume it and the way that it’s meant to be consumed,” Egan said. “It’s lovelier that way.”

TSO’s vice-president of marketing David Postill said the Impresarios Club was created to show a different twist to how music is presented.

“It allows them to talk to musicians and sometimes listen to a short piece,” Postill said. “The club enhances the social aspect of music and allows audiences to celebrate it.”

Egan said these new initiatives are experiencing popularity with younger attendees because traditional performances can feel like a university lecture hall.

“In comparison, a seminar class; it’s a more effective way of learning in a smaller scale,” Egan said. “With music, it’s a more effective way of communing with it, seeing its beauty, being involved in it and getting consumed by it.”

TSO has also been expanding its reach to schools with its educational music programs, including: school concerts, open rehearsals and teacher resources.

“Public schools are not as strong with music as it used to be,” Postill said. “We want to build the next audience by getting them excited and interested in music.”

With younger generations becoming the new audience to classical music, Postill said they need to meet these demands and adapt to the new changes and requests they present.

“Younger audiences are demanding more electronic ways to interact with the concerts,” Postill said. “We just have to be more flexible and adaptive to this.”

Although an older audience still dominates the seats of the concerts, Tafelmusik and TSO are seeing an increase of youth and young adults that are joining its club and attending its performances.

Norris said classical music will always have an audience, because the music is definitely not the problem.

“We need to think about different ways in which we can present what we do,” Norris said, “The music has lasted for 300, 400 years and could easily last for more. We have to respond to people’s changing tastes and how they want to enjoy music.”