Toronto man petitioning for ASD help for Aboriginal kids

Community Apr 14, 2017 by Fannie Sunshine Bloor West Villager

Ken Robertson moved his family some 4,000 kilometres from his home on a British Columbia reserve to Toronto so his children could receive top care for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

Robertson moved with his wife and four children, two of whom have ASD, to Toronto a decade ago from Neskonlith reserve due to a lack of support services on reservations.

The family could have stayed in British Columbia, but chose to make the trek to Toronto because of the city’s reputation as a leader in genetic research.

Though he’s happy his children have received medical and educational support, Robertson said First Nations children fall short of getting proper access to the health care they need.

That’s why the Lansdowne Avenue and Bloor Street resident created a petition in January with the goal of acquiring a report focused on urban Aboriginal children with autism and details of the wait list for off-reserve First Nations, Inuit, non-status and Métis children.

“It would be helpful for the Trudeau government to work with the provinces and territories and stakeholders to develop a pan-Canadian strategy for autism spectrum disorder, including, awareness and education campaigns, child, and adolescent and adult intervention innovative funding arrangements for financing therapy, surveillance, respite care, community initiatives, and research,” the petition reads. “We, the undersigned, Canadian citizens, call upon the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs to present findings to the Standing Senate Committee on Aboriginal Peoples.”

According to Autism Ontario, ASD is a lifelong neurological disorder that affects the way a person communicates and relates to the people and world around them, including behaviour, social interactions, and verbal communication.

Robertson is hoping to gather the 500 signatures needed for the government to acknowledge the petition by Thursday, May 4. As of the afternoon of Monday, April 10, it had 460 signatures.

He admitted he will be “disappointed” if the petition, sponsored by Davenport MP Julie Dzerowicz, were to fall short of signatures, but “the fight never ends.”

World Autism Day is celebrated April 2. According to the Ontario Autism Coalition, one of every 68 children is currently diagnosed.

To sign Robertson’s petition, visit petitions.parl.gc.ca and type e-697 in the search bar.

Toronto man petitioning for ASD help for Aboriginal kids

Petition needs 500 signatures by May 4

Community Apr 14, 2017 by Fannie Sunshine Bloor West Villager

Ken Robertson moved his family some 4,000 kilometres from his home on a British Columbia reserve to Toronto so his children could receive top care for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

Robertson moved with his wife and four children, two of whom have ASD, to Toronto a decade ago from Neskonlith reserve due to a lack of support services on reservations.

The family could have stayed in British Columbia, but chose to make the trek to Toronto because of the city’s reputation as a leader in genetic research.

Though he’s happy his children have received medical and educational support, Robertson said First Nations children fall short of getting proper access to the health care they need.

That’s why the Lansdowne Avenue and Bloor Street resident created a petition in January with the goal of acquiring a report focused on urban Aboriginal children with autism and details of the wait list for off-reserve First Nations, Inuit, non-status and Métis children.

“It would be helpful for the Trudeau government to work with the provinces and territories and stakeholders to develop a pan-Canadian strategy for autism spectrum disorder, including, awareness and education campaigns, child, and adolescent and adult intervention innovative funding arrangements for financing therapy, surveillance, respite care, community initiatives, and research,” the petition reads. “We, the undersigned, Canadian citizens, call upon the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs to present findings to the Standing Senate Committee on Aboriginal Peoples.”

According to Autism Ontario, ASD is a lifelong neurological disorder that affects the way a person communicates and relates to the people and world around them, including behaviour, social interactions, and verbal communication.

Robertson is hoping to gather the 500 signatures needed for the government to acknowledge the petition by Thursday, May 4. As of the afternoon of Monday, April 10, it had 460 signatures.

He admitted he will be “disappointed” if the petition, sponsored by Davenport MP Julie Dzerowicz, were to fall short of signatures, but “the fight never ends.”

World Autism Day is celebrated April 2. According to the Ontario Autism Coalition, one of every 68 children is currently diagnosed.

To sign Robertson’s petition, visit petitions.parl.gc.ca and type e-697 in the search bar.

Toronto man petitioning for ASD help for Aboriginal kids

Petition needs 500 signatures by May 4

Community Apr 14, 2017 by Fannie Sunshine Bloor West Villager

Ken Robertson moved his family some 4,000 kilometres from his home on a British Columbia reserve to Toronto so his children could receive top care for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

Robertson moved with his wife and four children, two of whom have ASD, to Toronto a decade ago from Neskonlith reserve due to a lack of support services on reservations.

The family could have stayed in British Columbia, but chose to make the trek to Toronto because of the city’s reputation as a leader in genetic research.

Though he’s happy his children have received medical and educational support, Robertson said First Nations children fall short of getting proper access to the health care they need.

That’s why the Lansdowne Avenue and Bloor Street resident created a petition in January with the goal of acquiring a report focused on urban Aboriginal children with autism and details of the wait list for off-reserve First Nations, Inuit, non-status and Métis children.

“It would be helpful for the Trudeau government to work with the provinces and territories and stakeholders to develop a pan-Canadian strategy for autism spectrum disorder, including, awareness and education campaigns, child, and adolescent and adult intervention innovative funding arrangements for financing therapy, surveillance, respite care, community initiatives, and research,” the petition reads. “We, the undersigned, Canadian citizens, call upon the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs to present findings to the Standing Senate Committee on Aboriginal Peoples.”

According to Autism Ontario, ASD is a lifelong neurological disorder that affects the way a person communicates and relates to the people and world around them, including behaviour, social interactions, and verbal communication.

Robertson is hoping to gather the 500 signatures needed for the government to acknowledge the petition by Thursday, May 4. As of the afternoon of Monday, April 10, it had 460 signatures.

He admitted he will be “disappointed” if the petition, sponsored by Davenport MP Julie Dzerowicz, were to fall short of signatures, but “the fight never ends.”

World Autism Day is celebrated April 2. According to the Ontario Autism Coalition, one of every 68 children is currently diagnosed.

To sign Robertson’s petition, visit petitions.parl.gc.ca and type e-697 in the search bar.