Three-century-old North York tree turned into wood art for Canada 150

Community Apr 03, 2017 by Jasmine Hui North York Mirror

A 300-year-old red oak tree is going to be cut down and turned into wood art just in time for Canada’s 150.

A few members of the Community Police Liaison Committee (CPLC) for 12 Division came together on March 30 at a property on St. Lucie Drive to cut parts of the red oak.

The tree is one of two 300-year-old red oaks that have been in the Mississauga's First Nation's history even when the British army was in Canada, circa 1812; the sister tree is located on Coral Gable Drive.

Madeleine McDowell is a Canadian historian that has researched about the red oak’s history in Mississauga and was present during the tree cutting.

She said Canadian explorer Alexander Henry led a group of First Nations from Mississauga to the Treaty of Fort Niagara in 1764.

“They would have gone by this tree,” McDowell said. “It took them one day to run from Lake Simcoe to what is now Lake Ontario.”

Trevor Comer, who is a member of the CPLC 12 Division and a woodcarver, sawed the tree to be used for art.

The chunks will be delivered to different artists in Canada to repurpose the wood and create art for Canada’s 150th birthday.

“I want to make a large acorn out of one of the chunks,” Comer said. “Different carvers and different artists will be taking the other parts of the tree."

A carbon print of the tree will also be made by Cameron McCuaig who is a volunteer for Mississauga’s heritage advisory committee and also a treecut artist.

“Cameron did a print of the Maple Leaf Forever Tree,” Comer said. “He will fingerprint the tree using the cross-section of the tree and use its own carbon to make a print. You can count how many rings there are and see the interesting lines in the grain.”

The tree, which was recognized as a heritage tree in 2010, was partially cut down in August 2016 because the city deemed it a hazard.

Most of the branches were cut off last year, but the owner of the tree wants the red oak to be cut low enough for it to be used as a table.

McDowell wishes for the tree to stay as tall as it can.

“It’s not likely to happen,” McDowell said, “Something that big that makes you feel a little bit humble is nice to have in the community. If it’s low like a table, you won’t get that humility.”

Although most of the tree will be cut, it cannot be uprooted because it is holding up the hill that part of the residential area is built.

The buildings around the tree will collapse into the Humber River, which is located nearby, if the roots are pulled.

The CPLC members hope Canadians will be able to see the history of the 300-year-old tree within the wood art that artists have created, as well as within the living sister tree.

Three-century-old North York tree turned into wood art for Canada 150

City deemed red oak tree a hazard

Community Apr 03, 2017 by Jasmine Hui North York Mirror

A 300-year-old red oak tree is going to be cut down and turned into wood art just in time for Canada’s 150.

A few members of the Community Police Liaison Committee (CPLC) for 12 Division came together on March 30 at a property on St. Lucie Drive to cut parts of the red oak.

The tree is one of two 300-year-old red oaks that have been in the Mississauga's First Nation's history even when the British army was in Canada, circa 1812; the sister tree is located on Coral Gable Drive.

Madeleine McDowell is a Canadian historian that has researched about the red oak’s history in Mississauga and was present during the tree cutting.

She said Canadian explorer Alexander Henry led a group of First Nations from Mississauga to the Treaty of Fort Niagara in 1764.

“They would have gone by this tree,” McDowell said. “It took them one day to run from Lake Simcoe to what is now Lake Ontario.”

Trevor Comer, who is a member of the CPLC 12 Division and a woodcarver, sawed the tree to be used for art.

The chunks will be delivered to different artists in Canada to repurpose the wood and create art for Canada’s 150th birthday.

“I want to make a large acorn out of one of the chunks,” Comer said. “Different carvers and different artists will be taking the other parts of the tree."

A carbon print of the tree will also be made by Cameron McCuaig who is a volunteer for Mississauga’s heritage advisory committee and also a treecut artist.

“Cameron did a print of the Maple Leaf Forever Tree,” Comer said. “He will fingerprint the tree using the cross-section of the tree and use its own carbon to make a print. You can count how many rings there are and see the interesting lines in the grain.”

The tree, which was recognized as a heritage tree in 2010, was partially cut down in August 2016 because the city deemed it a hazard.

Most of the branches were cut off last year, but the owner of the tree wants the red oak to be cut low enough for it to be used as a table.

McDowell wishes for the tree to stay as tall as it can.

“It’s not likely to happen,” McDowell said, “Something that big that makes you feel a little bit humble is nice to have in the community. If it’s low like a table, you won’t get that humility.”

Although most of the tree will be cut, it cannot be uprooted because it is holding up the hill that part of the residential area is built.

The buildings around the tree will collapse into the Humber River, which is located nearby, if the roots are pulled.

The CPLC members hope Canadians will be able to see the history of the 300-year-old tree within the wood art that artists have created, as well as within the living sister tree.

Three-century-old North York tree turned into wood art for Canada 150

City deemed red oak tree a hazard

Community Apr 03, 2017 by Jasmine Hui North York Mirror

A 300-year-old red oak tree is going to be cut down and turned into wood art just in time for Canada’s 150.

A few members of the Community Police Liaison Committee (CPLC) for 12 Division came together on March 30 at a property on St. Lucie Drive to cut parts of the red oak.

The tree is one of two 300-year-old red oaks that have been in the Mississauga's First Nation's history even when the British army was in Canada, circa 1812; the sister tree is located on Coral Gable Drive.

Madeleine McDowell is a Canadian historian that has researched about the red oak’s history in Mississauga and was present during the tree cutting.

She said Canadian explorer Alexander Henry led a group of First Nations from Mississauga to the Treaty of Fort Niagara in 1764.

“They would have gone by this tree,” McDowell said. “It took them one day to run from Lake Simcoe to what is now Lake Ontario.”

Trevor Comer, who is a member of the CPLC 12 Division and a woodcarver, sawed the tree to be used for art.

The chunks will be delivered to different artists in Canada to repurpose the wood and create art for Canada’s 150th birthday.

“I want to make a large acorn out of one of the chunks,” Comer said. “Different carvers and different artists will be taking the other parts of the tree."

A carbon print of the tree will also be made by Cameron McCuaig who is a volunteer for Mississauga’s heritage advisory committee and also a treecut artist.

“Cameron did a print of the Maple Leaf Forever Tree,” Comer said. “He will fingerprint the tree using the cross-section of the tree and use its own carbon to make a print. You can count how many rings there are and see the interesting lines in the grain.”

The tree, which was recognized as a heritage tree in 2010, was partially cut down in August 2016 because the city deemed it a hazard.

Most of the branches were cut off last year, but the owner of the tree wants the red oak to be cut low enough for it to be used as a table.

McDowell wishes for the tree to stay as tall as it can.

“It’s not likely to happen,” McDowell said, “Something that big that makes you feel a little bit humble is nice to have in the community. If it’s low like a table, you won’t get that humility.”

Although most of the tree will be cut, it cannot be uprooted because it is holding up the hill that part of the residential area is built.

The buildings around the tree will collapse into the Humber River, which is located nearby, if the roots are pulled.

The CPLC members hope Canadians will be able to see the history of the 300-year-old tree within the wood art that artists have created, as well as within the living sister tree.