Bishop Allen leads Catholic board solar project

Community Feb 05, 2012 Etobicoke Guardian

Bishop Allen Academy is the first Toronto Catholic school to use rooftop solar panels to generate both energy and revenue for its school board.

Board officials expect the solar power system to generate enough power for at least 95 Ontario homes. It is projected to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by nearly 260,000 pounds.

It is also a teaching tool.

Teachers and students at The Queensway-Royal York Road-area high school will use the portal to track in real time how much energy is being generated, how much revenue is being earned and how much energy is being saved. Students can also access information about solar energy, carbon footprint and energy measurement.

The Ministry of Education-funded project is expected to pay for itself in four-and-a-half years through revenues flowing back to the board from the sale of surplus energy to the Ontario Power Authority, as well as cost savings realized by powering the school itself with solar energy, board officials said.

At the official launch of the solar project Wednesday, Feb. 1, Toronto Catholic District School Board chair Ann Andrachuk lauded the ministry for its support and said the initiatives demonstrate the board's commitment to both the environment and the future of its students and communities.

Ministry funding is also being used, Andrachuk said, for energy audits at 50 board schools, installation of lighting controls, building automation systems, high-efficiency boilers and magnetic bearings chillers, new windows and roofs, as well as a solar thermo system, which uses the sun's energy to heat water that is pumped through it.

Blessed Cardinal Newman Catholic Secondary School in south Scarborough is the board's next planned rooftop solar project installation.

Bishop Allen leads Catholic board solar project

Community Feb 05, 2012 Etobicoke Guardian

Bishop Allen Academy is the first Toronto Catholic school to use rooftop solar panels to generate both energy and revenue for its school board.

Board officials expect the solar power system to generate enough power for at least 95 Ontario homes. It is projected to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by nearly 260,000 pounds.

It is also a teaching tool.

Teachers and students at The Queensway-Royal York Road-area high school will use the portal to track in real time how much energy is being generated, how much revenue is being earned and how much energy is being saved. Students can also access information about solar energy, carbon footprint and energy measurement.

Related Content

The Ministry of Education-funded project is expected to pay for itself in four-and-a-half years through revenues flowing back to the board from the sale of surplus energy to the Ontario Power Authority, as well as cost savings realized by powering the school itself with solar energy, board officials said.

At the official launch of the solar project Wednesday, Feb. 1, Toronto Catholic District School Board chair Ann Andrachuk lauded the ministry for its support and said the initiatives demonstrate the board's commitment to both the environment and the future of its students and communities.

Ministry funding is also being used, Andrachuk said, for energy audits at 50 board schools, installation of lighting controls, building automation systems, high-efficiency boilers and magnetic bearings chillers, new windows and roofs, as well as a solar thermo system, which uses the sun's energy to heat water that is pumped through it.

Blessed Cardinal Newman Catholic Secondary School in south Scarborough is the board's next planned rooftop solar project installation.

Bishop Allen leads Catholic board solar project

Community Feb 05, 2012 Etobicoke Guardian

Bishop Allen Academy is the first Toronto Catholic school to use rooftop solar panels to generate both energy and revenue for its school board.

Board officials expect the solar power system to generate enough power for at least 95 Ontario homes. It is projected to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by nearly 260,000 pounds.

It is also a teaching tool.

Teachers and students at The Queensway-Royal York Road-area high school will use the portal to track in real time how much energy is being generated, how much revenue is being earned and how much energy is being saved. Students can also access information about solar energy, carbon footprint and energy measurement.

Related Content

The Ministry of Education-funded project is expected to pay for itself in four-and-a-half years through revenues flowing back to the board from the sale of surplus energy to the Ontario Power Authority, as well as cost savings realized by powering the school itself with solar energy, board officials said.

At the official launch of the solar project Wednesday, Feb. 1, Toronto Catholic District School Board chair Ann Andrachuk lauded the ministry for its support and said the initiatives demonstrate the board's commitment to both the environment and the future of its students and communities.

Ministry funding is also being used, Andrachuk said, for energy audits at 50 board schools, installation of lighting controls, building automation systems, high-efficiency boilers and magnetic bearings chillers, new windows and roofs, as well as a solar thermo system, which uses the sun's energy to heat water that is pumped through it.

Blessed Cardinal Newman Catholic Secondary School in south Scarborough is the board's next planned rooftop solar project installation.