Kipling CI students pay tribute to Montreal Massacre victims

Community Dec 06, 2016 by Cynthia Reason Etobicoke Guardian

Geneviève Bergeron. Hélène Colgan. Nathalie Croteau. Barbara Daigneault. Anne-Marie Edward. Maud Haviernick. Barbara Klucznik Widajewicz. Maryse Laganière. Maryse Leclair. Anne-Marie Lemay. Sonia Pelletier. Michèle Richard. Annie St-Arneault. Annie Turcotte.

Kipling Collegiate Institute marked the 27th anniversary of the Dec. 6, 1989 massacre at l’École Polytechnique de Montréal Tuesday with a silent procession of male students bearing the photos of the 14 young women who were shot and killed that day simply for being women.

Luis Filipe and Jaclyn Cattrysse, the teachers who organized the event in honour of the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women, said they hoped the procession would spark a dialogue among all students — particularly among the male student body — about issues surrounding gender-based violence.

“The White Ribbon campaign was originally started by a group of men and boys about violence against women perpetrated specifically by men, so it was really important to get the boys involved,” Filipe said.

“At other schools I’ve worked at, there’s been less buy-in by the boys and it’s actually the girls doing all the work. So, there’s been a push to really make sure that boys are also sending this message out and being ambassadors for these kinds of issues.”

The anniversary of the Montreal massacre, he added, acts as a powerful entry point for both male and female students to wade into discussions surrounding gender-based violence — be it physical or emotional.

“First of all, just knowing it happened, and that it happened right here in Canada is important. It was such an egregious form of violence they can all understand it was wrong,” Filipe said.

“From there, we can start breaking it down to the idea that smaller forms of violence happen every day. Things they can even see and find here at school also contribute to that type of context that allows for some of this to happen later on. Hopefully, now they’ll feel empowered to actually stand up to some of those words and actions they see in the hallways.”

Saqib Ali, 17, was one of the 13 male students involved in the procession, which not only paid tribute to the 14 Montreal victims, but also recognized the more than 1,000 aboriginal women and girls who have been murdered or gone missing in Canada since 1980.

“This walk shows the fact that women’s rights should be kept safe and they should be recognized just like men,” said Ali, a Grade 12 student.

“It’s meant to show the school and give the students a sense of responsibility to think of every girl as their sister or mother or grandmother, and to have a safe relationship with them. It symbolizes that men should look after their relationships with women.”

Kipling CI students also honoured the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women with a poster and White Ribbon campaign. All proceeds from the sale of ribbons will benefit Women’s Habitat, a 25-bed shelter in south Etobicoke serving women and children escaping violence.

Kipling CI students pay tribute to Montreal Massacre victims

Community Dec 06, 2016 by Cynthia Reason Etobicoke Guardian

Geneviève Bergeron. Hélène Colgan. Nathalie Croteau. Barbara Daigneault. Anne-Marie Edward. Maud Haviernick. Barbara Klucznik Widajewicz. Maryse Laganière. Maryse Leclair. Anne-Marie Lemay. Sonia Pelletier. Michèle Richard. Annie St-Arneault. Annie Turcotte.

Kipling Collegiate Institute marked the 27th anniversary of the Dec. 6, 1989 massacre at l’École Polytechnique de Montréal Tuesday with a silent procession of male students bearing the photos of the 14 young women who were shot and killed that day simply for being women.

Luis Filipe and Jaclyn Cattrysse, the teachers who organized the event in honour of the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women, said they hoped the procession would spark a dialogue among all students — particularly among the male student body — about issues surrounding gender-based violence.

“The White Ribbon campaign was originally started by a group of men and boys about violence against women perpetrated specifically by men, so it was really important to get the boys involved,” Filipe said.

“At other schools I’ve worked at, there’s been less buy-in by the boys and it’s actually the girls doing all the work. So, there’s been a push to really make sure that boys are also sending this message out and being ambassadors for these kinds of issues.”

The anniversary of the Montreal massacre, he added, acts as a powerful entry point for both male and female students to wade into discussions surrounding gender-based violence — be it physical or emotional.

“First of all, just knowing it happened, and that it happened right here in Canada is important. It was such an egregious form of violence they can all understand it was wrong,” Filipe said.

“From there, we can start breaking it down to the idea that smaller forms of violence happen every day. Things they can even see and find here at school also contribute to that type of context that allows for some of this to happen later on. Hopefully, now they’ll feel empowered to actually stand up to some of those words and actions they see in the hallways.”

Saqib Ali, 17, was one of the 13 male students involved in the procession, which not only paid tribute to the 14 Montreal victims, but also recognized the more than 1,000 aboriginal women and girls who have been murdered or gone missing in Canada since 1980.

“This walk shows the fact that women’s rights should be kept safe and they should be recognized just like men,” said Ali, a Grade 12 student.

“It’s meant to show the school and give the students a sense of responsibility to think of every girl as their sister or mother or grandmother, and to have a safe relationship with them. It symbolizes that men should look after their relationships with women.”

Kipling CI students also honoured the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women with a poster and White Ribbon campaign. All proceeds from the sale of ribbons will benefit Women’s Habitat, a 25-bed shelter in south Etobicoke serving women and children escaping violence.

Kipling CI students pay tribute to Montreal Massacre victims

Community Dec 06, 2016 by Cynthia Reason Etobicoke Guardian

Geneviève Bergeron. Hélène Colgan. Nathalie Croteau. Barbara Daigneault. Anne-Marie Edward. Maud Haviernick. Barbara Klucznik Widajewicz. Maryse Laganière. Maryse Leclair. Anne-Marie Lemay. Sonia Pelletier. Michèle Richard. Annie St-Arneault. Annie Turcotte.

Kipling Collegiate Institute marked the 27th anniversary of the Dec. 6, 1989 massacre at l’École Polytechnique de Montréal Tuesday with a silent procession of male students bearing the photos of the 14 young women who were shot and killed that day simply for being women.

Luis Filipe and Jaclyn Cattrysse, the teachers who organized the event in honour of the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women, said they hoped the procession would spark a dialogue among all students — particularly among the male student body — about issues surrounding gender-based violence.

“The White Ribbon campaign was originally started by a group of men and boys about violence against women perpetrated specifically by men, so it was really important to get the boys involved,” Filipe said.

“At other schools I’ve worked at, there’s been less buy-in by the boys and it’s actually the girls doing all the work. So, there’s been a push to really make sure that boys are also sending this message out and being ambassadors for these kinds of issues.”

The anniversary of the Montreal massacre, he added, acts as a powerful entry point for both male and female students to wade into discussions surrounding gender-based violence — be it physical or emotional.

“First of all, just knowing it happened, and that it happened right here in Canada is important. It was such an egregious form of violence they can all understand it was wrong,” Filipe said.

“From there, we can start breaking it down to the idea that smaller forms of violence happen every day. Things they can even see and find here at school also contribute to that type of context that allows for some of this to happen later on. Hopefully, now they’ll feel empowered to actually stand up to some of those words and actions they see in the hallways.”

Saqib Ali, 17, was one of the 13 male students involved in the procession, which not only paid tribute to the 14 Montreal victims, but also recognized the more than 1,000 aboriginal women and girls who have been murdered or gone missing in Canada since 1980.

“This walk shows the fact that women’s rights should be kept safe and they should be recognized just like men,” said Ali, a Grade 12 student.

“It’s meant to show the school and give the students a sense of responsibility to think of every girl as their sister or mother or grandmother, and to have a safe relationship with them. It symbolizes that men should look after their relationships with women.”

Kipling CI students also honoured the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women with a poster and White Ribbon campaign. All proceeds from the sale of ribbons will benefit Women’s Habitat, a 25-bed shelter in south Etobicoke serving women and children escaping violence.