Science is a passion for students at National Chemistry Week fair in Scarborough

Community Oct 29, 2016 by Mike Adler Scarborough Mirror

First, Shrimon Kesavan, 13, demonstrates a chemical reaction using milk, food colouring and dish soap.

Next, the eighth grader shows a visitor to a National Chemistry Week fair in Scarborough how baking soda and vinegar can extinguish fires.

“Science is my passion,” Shrimon said from a table in the Woodside Centre mall on Saturday, Oct. 29 during an event hosted by scientists trying to get children interested in careers in chemistry.

Shrimon is keeping those job opportunities in mind, but also the power of chemistry to make things happen.

“Little kids come here just to see us do experiments and learn. They could be one of those people who could change the world with science,” he said.

Other experiments at the annual event hosted by the Toronto East chapter of the Ontario Association of Certified Engineering Technicians and Technologists (OACETT) taught passing kids how to be a human battery, make Play-Doh, and dissolve Skittles for the fun of it.

“We do this to plant a seed,” Lorrie Machett, a volunteer with a background in aviation and nuclear sciences. “If they come here, they might light up like a Christmas tree, and say ‘that’s cool.’”

Nearby, Ran Yi, an environmental scientist, used a group silver and zinc cells to power a clock from her wrist.

“One day, you’ll be able to run a cell phone from body heat alone,” Patchett said.

“We might as well use what we have to generate power in the cleanest possible way.”

Shrimon’s brother Athul, who’s 15, demonstrated another “science hack” by applying some lime juice to a sliced apple, which kept the apple from turning brown.

Also participating Saturday was Scientists in School, a Canadian charity running workshops to spark interest in science.

OACETT members said there is a bright future for girls in the sciences as well as boys.

“Engineering, chemistry, is not for men, it’s for everybody,” said Pasha Mohammed, the Toronto East chapter’s college liaison.

Science is a passion for students at National Chemistry Week fair in Scarborough

Community Oct 29, 2016 by Mike Adler Scarborough Mirror

First, Shrimon Kesavan, 13, demonstrates a chemical reaction using milk, food colouring and dish soap.

Next, the eighth grader shows a visitor to a National Chemistry Week fair in Scarborough how baking soda and vinegar can extinguish fires.

“Science is my passion,” Shrimon said from a table in the Woodside Centre mall on Saturday, Oct. 29 during an event hosted by scientists trying to get children interested in careers in chemistry.

Shrimon is keeping those job opportunities in mind, but also the power of chemistry to make things happen.

“Little kids come here just to see us do experiments and learn. They could be one of those people who could change the world with science,” he said.

Other experiments at the annual event hosted by the Toronto East chapter of the Ontario Association of Certified Engineering Technicians and Technologists (OACETT) taught passing kids how to be a human battery, make Play-Doh, and dissolve Skittles for the fun of it.

“We do this to plant a seed,” Lorrie Machett, a volunteer with a background in aviation and nuclear sciences. “If they come here, they might light up like a Christmas tree, and say ‘that’s cool.’”

Nearby, Ran Yi, an environmental scientist, used a group silver and zinc cells to power a clock from her wrist.

“One day, you’ll be able to run a cell phone from body heat alone,” Patchett said.

“We might as well use what we have to generate power in the cleanest possible way.”

Shrimon’s brother Athul, who’s 15, demonstrated another “science hack” by applying some lime juice to a sliced apple, which kept the apple from turning brown.

Also participating Saturday was Scientists in School, a Canadian charity running workshops to spark interest in science.

OACETT members said there is a bright future for girls in the sciences as well as boys.

“Engineering, chemistry, is not for men, it’s for everybody,” said Pasha Mohammed, the Toronto East chapter’s college liaison.

Science is a passion for students at National Chemistry Week fair in Scarborough

Community Oct 29, 2016 by Mike Adler Scarborough Mirror

First, Shrimon Kesavan, 13, demonstrates a chemical reaction using milk, food colouring and dish soap.

Next, the eighth grader shows a visitor to a National Chemistry Week fair in Scarborough how baking soda and vinegar can extinguish fires.

“Science is my passion,” Shrimon said from a table in the Woodside Centre mall on Saturday, Oct. 29 during an event hosted by scientists trying to get children interested in careers in chemistry.

Shrimon is keeping those job opportunities in mind, but also the power of chemistry to make things happen.

“Little kids come here just to see us do experiments and learn. They could be one of those people who could change the world with science,” he said.

Other experiments at the annual event hosted by the Toronto East chapter of the Ontario Association of Certified Engineering Technicians and Technologists (OACETT) taught passing kids how to be a human battery, make Play-Doh, and dissolve Skittles for the fun of it.

“We do this to plant a seed,” Lorrie Machett, a volunteer with a background in aviation and nuclear sciences. “If they come here, they might light up like a Christmas tree, and say ‘that’s cool.’”

Nearby, Ran Yi, an environmental scientist, used a group silver and zinc cells to power a clock from her wrist.

“One day, you’ll be able to run a cell phone from body heat alone,” Patchett said.

“We might as well use what we have to generate power in the cleanest possible way.”

Shrimon’s brother Athul, who’s 15, demonstrated another “science hack” by applying some lime juice to a sliced apple, which kept the apple from turning brown.

Also participating Saturday was Scientists in School, a Canadian charity running workshops to spark interest in science.

OACETT members said there is a bright future for girls in the sciences as well as boys.

“Engineering, chemistry, is not for men, it’s for everybody,” said Pasha Mohammed, the Toronto East chapter’s college liaison.