Jamie Oliver joins Stop Marketing to Kids Coalition to find solution to Canadian youth obesity

Community Oct 08, 2016 by Tara Hatherly East York Mirror

Chef Jamie Oliver joined members of the Stop Marketing to Kids Coalition at Evergreen Brick Works in Toronto Thursday, Oct. 6 to talk about childhood obesity.

The panel discussion also featured Nick Saul, president and CEO of Community Food Centres of Canada; Dr. Jan Hux, chief science officer for Canadian Diabetes Association; Dr. Tom Warshawski, pediatrician and CEO of Community Food Centres of Canada; Geoff Craig, chief marketing officer for Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada; youth advocate Nathan Sing; and Canadian Senator Nancy Greene Raine.

“This conversation is important,” said Oliver. “The biggest business on this planet is the food business … and we have a broken system.”

He urged Canada to be a world leader in creating policies that help people make healthy choices — banning the marketing of unhealthy food and drinks to kids, adding kid-sized portion information to food labels and taxing sugary drinks to fund health initiatives like expanded food education in schools. He also urged the Canadian government to ensure all kids, including those in Indigenous communities, have access to affordable healthy food choices.

“I think it’s important that we remember that kids are not born on Earth to just eat nuggets,” he said. “This is not genetic. We created this. It’s called marketing, it’s called comfort, it’s called familiarity.”

Unhealthy diets are taking years off Canadians’ lives at the same rate as cigarettes, the panel noted, and creating an unsustainable burden on our health-care system.

“We cannot afford to do nothing,” said Hux. “We need to get serious about prevention.”

The panel members stressed the need for independent regulation of food marketing in Canada.

“Industry self-regulation is a failure,” said Craig. “The standards are lax, participation is voluntary and there is more advertising and marketing to children than ever before.

“We know that over 90 per cent of food decisions in the household are driven by children,” he added. “The ‘nag factor’ does not come out of nowhere — it is driven by marketing messages. It is not a fair fight for parents. Winning the battle for harmony often means losing the battle for health.”

More than 30 per cent of Canadian children ages 5 to 17 are overweight or obese, a number that continues to climb.

“The doubling and tripling of obesity and diet-related disease in the last 30 years in most of our developing countries is phenomenal,” Oliver said. “There’s 43 million children under five that are overweight or obese ... and now we have a double burden in many countries where we have obesity and hunger, and this is a challenge for many, many countries.”

Jamie Oliver joins Stop Marketing to Kids Coalition to find solution to Canadian youth obesity

Community Oct 08, 2016 by Tara Hatherly East York Mirror

Chef Jamie Oliver joined members of the Stop Marketing to Kids Coalition at Evergreen Brick Works in Toronto Thursday, Oct. 6 to talk about childhood obesity.

The panel discussion also featured Nick Saul, president and CEO of Community Food Centres of Canada; Dr. Jan Hux, chief science officer for Canadian Diabetes Association; Dr. Tom Warshawski, pediatrician and CEO of Community Food Centres of Canada; Geoff Craig, chief marketing officer for Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada; youth advocate Nathan Sing; and Canadian Senator Nancy Greene Raine.

“This conversation is important,” said Oliver. “The biggest business on this planet is the food business … and we have a broken system.”

He urged Canada to be a world leader in creating policies that help people make healthy choices — banning the marketing of unhealthy food and drinks to kids, adding kid-sized portion information to food labels and taxing sugary drinks to fund health initiatives like expanded food education in schools. He also urged the Canadian government to ensure all kids, including those in Indigenous communities, have access to affordable healthy food choices.

“I think it’s important that we remember that kids are not born on Earth to just eat nuggets,” he said. “This is not genetic. We created this. It’s called marketing, it’s called comfort, it’s called familiarity.”

Unhealthy diets are taking years off Canadians’ lives at the same rate as cigarettes, the panel noted, and creating an unsustainable burden on our health-care system.

“We cannot afford to do nothing,” said Hux. “We need to get serious about prevention.”

The panel members stressed the need for independent regulation of food marketing in Canada.

“Industry self-regulation is a failure,” said Craig. “The standards are lax, participation is voluntary and there is more advertising and marketing to children than ever before.

“We know that over 90 per cent of food decisions in the household are driven by children,” he added. “The ‘nag factor’ does not come out of nowhere — it is driven by marketing messages. It is not a fair fight for parents. Winning the battle for harmony often means losing the battle for health.”

More than 30 per cent of Canadian children ages 5 to 17 are overweight or obese, a number that continues to climb.

“The doubling and tripling of obesity and diet-related disease in the last 30 years in most of our developing countries is phenomenal,” Oliver said. “There’s 43 million children under five that are overweight or obese ... and now we have a double burden in many countries where we have obesity and hunger, and this is a challenge for many, many countries.”

Jamie Oliver joins Stop Marketing to Kids Coalition to find solution to Canadian youth obesity

Community Oct 08, 2016 by Tara Hatherly East York Mirror

Chef Jamie Oliver joined members of the Stop Marketing to Kids Coalition at Evergreen Brick Works in Toronto Thursday, Oct. 6 to talk about childhood obesity.

The panel discussion also featured Nick Saul, president and CEO of Community Food Centres of Canada; Dr. Jan Hux, chief science officer for Canadian Diabetes Association; Dr. Tom Warshawski, pediatrician and CEO of Community Food Centres of Canada; Geoff Craig, chief marketing officer for Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada; youth advocate Nathan Sing; and Canadian Senator Nancy Greene Raine.

“This conversation is important,” said Oliver. “The biggest business on this planet is the food business … and we have a broken system.”

He urged Canada to be a world leader in creating policies that help people make healthy choices — banning the marketing of unhealthy food and drinks to kids, adding kid-sized portion information to food labels and taxing sugary drinks to fund health initiatives like expanded food education in schools. He also urged the Canadian government to ensure all kids, including those in Indigenous communities, have access to affordable healthy food choices.

“I think it’s important that we remember that kids are not born on Earth to just eat nuggets,” he said. “This is not genetic. We created this. It’s called marketing, it’s called comfort, it’s called familiarity.”

Unhealthy diets are taking years off Canadians’ lives at the same rate as cigarettes, the panel noted, and creating an unsustainable burden on our health-care system.

“We cannot afford to do nothing,” said Hux. “We need to get serious about prevention.”

The panel members stressed the need for independent regulation of food marketing in Canada.

“Industry self-regulation is a failure,” said Craig. “The standards are lax, participation is voluntary and there is more advertising and marketing to children than ever before.

“We know that over 90 per cent of food decisions in the household are driven by children,” he added. “The ‘nag factor’ does not come out of nowhere — it is driven by marketing messages. It is not a fair fight for parents. Winning the battle for harmony often means losing the battle for health.”

More than 30 per cent of Canadian children ages 5 to 17 are overweight or obese, a number that continues to climb.

“The doubling and tripling of obesity and diet-related disease in the last 30 years in most of our developing countries is phenomenal,” Oliver said. “There’s 43 million children under five that are overweight or obese ... and now we have a double burden in many countries where we have obesity and hunger, and this is a challenge for many, many countries.”