Upcoming project at Labspace Studio is nothing to worry about

Community Jun 24, 2011 by Joanna Lavoie East York Mirror

Everyone worries.

And not surprisingly, the things we tend to concern ourselves with the most are common issues like body image, money, friends, family and love, said Laura Mendes, co-curator of an exhibition called I Worry, which is set to open Friday, June 24 at Leslieville's Labspace Studio, a hybrid creative agency and art house located at 2A Pape Ave., at Eastern Avenue.

"What we've taken from all these worries is that everyone worries about the same things," Mendes said, adding she's comforted by the fact we're not alone in our concerns.

I Worry is the first instalment of a curated collection of creative projects and social experiments called The (Re)collection Project, which investigates how people remember the past, experience the present, and think about the future.

"We wanted to blur the lines of art, life and experiences and look at subjects everyone can identify with," she said.

Dubbed part social experiment, part confessional, part interactive video installation, I Worry involves more than 100 collaborators sharing their most intimate anxieties about what worries them most.

The exhibit aims to get people thinking and talking about how some worries are more prolific than others and if common worries are signs of larger problems in society.

In 2010, Gabrielle Zilkha and Jenn Mason, co-directors of The Spotlight Project (www.thespotlightproject.ca), a creative arts production company that uses the arts as a platform to raise awareness and funds for worthy causes, asked 80 people of all ages, backgrounds and walks of life to reveal on camera their biggest worry.

A few months ago, Mason and Zilka approached Labspace's co-directors Laura Mendes and John Loerchner about collaborating on an installation.

"We thought it was a great fit with our established series," she said.

Zilkha and Mason's original footage, which was shot in Kensington Market, has now been edited and will be projected on to four floor-to-ceiling sheets of fabric during the I Worry exhibition, which will run June 24 to 26 at Labspace Studio. The exhibit's opening reception is set for Friday, June 24 from 7 p.m. to 1 a.m. Admission is pay-what-you-can.

For the series, people have also been invited to anonymously post what they worry about the most in a digital forum on an online worry archive. The more than 100 "worries" submitted by people from across North America will be combined with the video footage collected by The Spotlight Project.

During the interactive exhibition, people will also be invited to record their biggest worry on video as well as scrawl it on the walls of Labspace Studio's "art therapy zone."

"It's not a negative show in any way. It's a really uplifting show that unites people," Mendes said.

"It's just a really honest show."

For more information about I Worry, visit http://recollectionproject.com/future

The (Re)collection Project's second installment, called Moments Intercepted (http://recollectionproject.com/present), uses creativity to encourage people to be more "present" in their day-to-day lives.

Called an experience-activated art project and digital archive, Moments Intercepted invites participants to respond, document and transform everyday moments into miniature projects through a series of random and impulsive creative challenges.

Designed to break people out of their comfort zone, the challenges will be sent via email or text message randomly to participants from June 6 to July 6.

So far, 107 collaborators from across North America have signed on to participate in the month-long project.

Participants are asked to respond to as many challenges as possible and upload their responses to a digital archive.

Those who respond to five or more challenges may be invited to create their own installation, performance, video, etc.

Labspace Studio will then compile the digital archive of everyday moments of all descriptions - pure, unadulterated, creative moments, big moments, small moments, private moments and public moments - into a multidisciplinary installation, which will be exhibited at Labspace Studio July 22 to 25.

Mendes and Loerchner are the curators of Memories Intercepted.

In Memory, the third part of the series, is a more traditional collection of collaborative art installations that recalls, reinterprets and recreates a past memory, said Mendes.

"It's all about reflecting on the past and looking at memories," she added.

Pairs of participants are now being invited to submit shared pieces.

The In Memory exhibition is set for Aug. 19 to 21 at Labspace Studio.

This installment is curated by Annie Onyi Cheung and Labspace's Mendes and Loerchner.

Visit http://recollectionproject.com/past for more details.

Upcoming project at Labspace Studio is nothing to worry about

The (Re)collection Project, investigates how we remember the past, experience the present, and think about the future

Community Jun 24, 2011 by Joanna Lavoie East York Mirror

Everyone worries.

And not surprisingly, the things we tend to concern ourselves with the most are common issues like body image, money, friends, family and love, said Laura Mendes, co-curator of an exhibition called I Worry, which is set to open Friday, June 24 at Leslieville's Labspace Studio, a hybrid creative agency and art house located at 2A Pape Ave., at Eastern Avenue.

"What we've taken from all these worries is that everyone worries about the same things," Mendes said, adding she's comforted by the fact we're not alone in our concerns.

I Worry is the first instalment of a curated collection of creative projects and social experiments called The (Re)collection Project, which investigates how people remember the past, experience the present, and think about the future.

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"We wanted to blur the lines of art, life and experiences and look at subjects everyone can identify with," she said.

Dubbed part social experiment, part confessional, part interactive video installation, I Worry involves more than 100 collaborators sharing their most intimate anxieties about what worries them most.

The exhibit aims to get people thinking and talking about how some worries are more prolific than others and if common worries are signs of larger problems in society.

In 2010, Gabrielle Zilkha and Jenn Mason, co-directors of The Spotlight Project (www.thespotlightproject.ca), a creative arts production company that uses the arts as a platform to raise awareness and funds for worthy causes, asked 80 people of all ages, backgrounds and walks of life to reveal on camera their biggest worry.

A few months ago, Mason and Zilka approached Labspace's co-directors Laura Mendes and John Loerchner about collaborating on an installation.

"We thought it was a great fit with our established series," she said.

Zilkha and Mason's original footage, which was shot in Kensington Market, has now been edited and will be projected on to four floor-to-ceiling sheets of fabric during the I Worry exhibition, which will run June 24 to 26 at Labspace Studio. The exhibit's opening reception is set for Friday, June 24 from 7 p.m. to 1 a.m. Admission is pay-what-you-can.

For the series, people have also been invited to anonymously post what they worry about the most in a digital forum on an online worry archive. The more than 100 "worries" submitted by people from across North America will be combined with the video footage collected by The Spotlight Project.

During the interactive exhibition, people will also be invited to record their biggest worry on video as well as scrawl it on the walls of Labspace Studio's "art therapy zone."

"It's not a negative show in any way. It's a really uplifting show that unites people," Mendes said.

"It's just a really honest show."

For more information about I Worry, visit http://recollectionproject.com/future

The (Re)collection Project's second installment, called Moments Intercepted (http://recollectionproject.com/present), uses creativity to encourage people to be more "present" in their day-to-day lives.

Called an experience-activated art project and digital archive, Moments Intercepted invites participants to respond, document and transform everyday moments into miniature projects through a series of random and impulsive creative challenges.

Designed to break people out of their comfort zone, the challenges will be sent via email or text message randomly to participants from June 6 to July 6.

So far, 107 collaborators from across North America have signed on to participate in the month-long project.

Participants are asked to respond to as many challenges as possible and upload their responses to a digital archive.

Those who respond to five or more challenges may be invited to create their own installation, performance, video, etc.

Labspace Studio will then compile the digital archive of everyday moments of all descriptions - pure, unadulterated, creative moments, big moments, small moments, private moments and public moments - into a multidisciplinary installation, which will be exhibited at Labspace Studio July 22 to 25.

Mendes and Loerchner are the curators of Memories Intercepted.

In Memory, the third part of the series, is a more traditional collection of collaborative art installations that recalls, reinterprets and recreates a past memory, said Mendes.

"It's all about reflecting on the past and looking at memories," she added.

Pairs of participants are now being invited to submit shared pieces.

The In Memory exhibition is set for Aug. 19 to 21 at Labspace Studio.

This installment is curated by Annie Onyi Cheung and Labspace's Mendes and Loerchner.

Visit http://recollectionproject.com/past for more details.

Upcoming project at Labspace Studio is nothing to worry about

The (Re)collection Project, investigates how we remember the past, experience the present, and think about the future

Community Jun 24, 2011 by Joanna Lavoie East York Mirror

Everyone worries.

And not surprisingly, the things we tend to concern ourselves with the most are common issues like body image, money, friends, family and love, said Laura Mendes, co-curator of an exhibition called I Worry, which is set to open Friday, June 24 at Leslieville's Labspace Studio, a hybrid creative agency and art house located at 2A Pape Ave., at Eastern Avenue.

"What we've taken from all these worries is that everyone worries about the same things," Mendes said, adding she's comforted by the fact we're not alone in our concerns.

I Worry is the first instalment of a curated collection of creative projects and social experiments called The (Re)collection Project, which investigates how people remember the past, experience the present, and think about the future.

Related Content

"We wanted to blur the lines of art, life and experiences and look at subjects everyone can identify with," she said.

Dubbed part social experiment, part confessional, part interactive video installation, I Worry involves more than 100 collaborators sharing their most intimate anxieties about what worries them most.

The exhibit aims to get people thinking and talking about how some worries are more prolific than others and if common worries are signs of larger problems in society.

In 2010, Gabrielle Zilkha and Jenn Mason, co-directors of The Spotlight Project (www.thespotlightproject.ca), a creative arts production company that uses the arts as a platform to raise awareness and funds for worthy causes, asked 80 people of all ages, backgrounds and walks of life to reveal on camera their biggest worry.

A few months ago, Mason and Zilka approached Labspace's co-directors Laura Mendes and John Loerchner about collaborating on an installation.

"We thought it was a great fit with our established series," she said.

Zilkha and Mason's original footage, which was shot in Kensington Market, has now been edited and will be projected on to four floor-to-ceiling sheets of fabric during the I Worry exhibition, which will run June 24 to 26 at Labspace Studio. The exhibit's opening reception is set for Friday, June 24 from 7 p.m. to 1 a.m. Admission is pay-what-you-can.

For the series, people have also been invited to anonymously post what they worry about the most in a digital forum on an online worry archive. The more than 100 "worries" submitted by people from across North America will be combined with the video footage collected by The Spotlight Project.

During the interactive exhibition, people will also be invited to record their biggest worry on video as well as scrawl it on the walls of Labspace Studio's "art therapy zone."

"It's not a negative show in any way. It's a really uplifting show that unites people," Mendes said.

"It's just a really honest show."

For more information about I Worry, visit http://recollectionproject.com/future

The (Re)collection Project's second installment, called Moments Intercepted (http://recollectionproject.com/present), uses creativity to encourage people to be more "present" in their day-to-day lives.

Called an experience-activated art project and digital archive, Moments Intercepted invites participants to respond, document and transform everyday moments into miniature projects through a series of random and impulsive creative challenges.

Designed to break people out of their comfort zone, the challenges will be sent via email or text message randomly to participants from June 6 to July 6.

So far, 107 collaborators from across North America have signed on to participate in the month-long project.

Participants are asked to respond to as many challenges as possible and upload their responses to a digital archive.

Those who respond to five or more challenges may be invited to create their own installation, performance, video, etc.

Labspace Studio will then compile the digital archive of everyday moments of all descriptions - pure, unadulterated, creative moments, big moments, small moments, private moments and public moments - into a multidisciplinary installation, which will be exhibited at Labspace Studio July 22 to 25.

Mendes and Loerchner are the curators of Memories Intercepted.

In Memory, the third part of the series, is a more traditional collection of collaborative art installations that recalls, reinterprets and recreates a past memory, said Mendes.

"It's all about reflecting on the past and looking at memories," she added.

Pairs of participants are now being invited to submit shared pieces.

The In Memory exhibition is set for Aug. 19 to 21 at Labspace Studio.

This installment is curated by Annie Onyi Cheung and Labspace's Mendes and Loerchner.

Visit http://recollectionproject.com/past for more details.