Dental professionals warn people against getting oral piercings

Blog Post May 26, 2016

By Anaida Deti

Do you hear that? It’s the sound of dental professionals everywhere begging you to choose another form of self-expression other than oral piercings. Oral piercings usually consist of a barbell through the tongue or ring through the lip, but can also include the labret (the area between the lower lip and chin), the uvula and the cheeks — with the jewelry coming in all sorts of styles and metals.

The Risks of Oral Piercings:

As ‘cool’ as it looks, the side effects to your oral health can be downright dangerous. Your mouth contains millions of bacteria and as with any puncture would or incision, pain, swelling and infection are high on the list of potential side effects, as well as:

• Your mouth and tongue could swell to the point of blocking off your airway

• Choking on the jewelry if it breaks off in your mouth

• Cracking a tooth (or teeth) if you accidently bite down too hard on the piercing as well as constantly clicking the jewelry against your teeth can cause injury to your gums and damage to any fillings

• Oral piercings can increase saliva flow and hinder your ability to pronounce words correctly

Some of the more serious side effects to occur are:

• Serious infection(s) can lead to hepatitis or endocarditis

• Nerve damage: oral piercings may cause your tongue to be numb — usually its temporary, although permanent nerve damage can happen

• If a blood vessel is wounded during the piercing, there could an excessive bleeding and serious blood loss

• Compromise the results of dental X-rays

Precautions to take:

If you do decide on getting an oral piercing, you should always be cautious of the place doing the piercings:

• Is the establishment clean?

• Do they have an infection-control policy posted?

• Are they using new/sterilized needles?

Tips to help avoid infections/complications:

After you’ve received your new piercing(s), be sure to keep the site clean by:

• Using a mouth rinse after every meal

• Disinfect your oral jewelry regularly as well as brush it the same way you brush your teeth

• Be sure to remove it when and if you are playing sports

• Most importantly, see your dentist professional regularly.

If you notice or experience any signs of an infection such as swelling, pain, fever, chills, or shaking, reach out to your dentist or physician immediately.

---

Anaida Deti a registered dental hygenist and the founder and CEO of Dental X Dental Hygiene Clinics - @DentalXSmiles. She is an active member and trainer with the Canadian, Ontario and Toronto Dental Hygienists Association (ODHA), and was elected as the ODHA ambassador for Toronto North. Deti has made it her mission to not only educate patients on the importance of dental health, but to also be an oral health educator for dental conventions where she is a coveted speaker. Connect with her @anaidadeti or www.dentalx.ca

Dental professionals warn people against getting oral piercings

Blog Post May 26, 2016

By Anaida Deti

Do you hear that? It’s the sound of dental professionals everywhere begging you to choose another form of self-expression other than oral piercings. Oral piercings usually consist of a barbell through the tongue or ring through the lip, but can also include the labret (the area between the lower lip and chin), the uvula and the cheeks — with the jewelry coming in all sorts of styles and metals.

The Risks of Oral Piercings:

As ‘cool’ as it looks, the side effects to your oral health can be downright dangerous. Your mouth contains millions of bacteria and as with any puncture would or incision, pain, swelling and infection are high on the list of potential side effects, as well as:

• Your mouth and tongue could swell to the point of blocking off your airway

• Choking on the jewelry if it breaks off in your mouth

• Cracking a tooth (or teeth) if you accidently bite down too hard on the piercing as well as constantly clicking the jewelry against your teeth can cause injury to your gums and damage to any fillings

• Oral piercings can increase saliva flow and hinder your ability to pronounce words correctly

Some of the more serious side effects to occur are:

• Serious infection(s) can lead to hepatitis or endocarditis

• Nerve damage: oral piercings may cause your tongue to be numb — usually its temporary, although permanent nerve damage can happen

• If a blood vessel is wounded during the piercing, there could an excessive bleeding and serious blood loss

• Compromise the results of dental X-rays

Precautions to take:

If you do decide on getting an oral piercing, you should always be cautious of the place doing the piercings:

• Is the establishment clean?

• Do they have an infection-control policy posted?

• Are they using new/sterilized needles?

Tips to help avoid infections/complications:

After you’ve received your new piercing(s), be sure to keep the site clean by:

• Using a mouth rinse after every meal

• Disinfect your oral jewelry regularly as well as brush it the same way you brush your teeth

• Be sure to remove it when and if you are playing sports

• Most importantly, see your dentist professional regularly.

If you notice or experience any signs of an infection such as swelling, pain, fever, chills, or shaking, reach out to your dentist or physician immediately.

---

Anaida Deti a registered dental hygenist and the founder and CEO of Dental X Dental Hygiene Clinics - @DentalXSmiles. She is an active member and trainer with the Canadian, Ontario and Toronto Dental Hygienists Association (ODHA), and was elected as the ODHA ambassador for Toronto North. Deti has made it her mission to not only educate patients on the importance of dental health, but to also be an oral health educator for dental conventions where she is a coveted speaker. Connect with her @anaidadeti or www.dentalx.ca

Dental professionals warn people against getting oral piercings

Blog Post May 26, 2016

By Anaida Deti

Do you hear that? It’s the sound of dental professionals everywhere begging you to choose another form of self-expression other than oral piercings. Oral piercings usually consist of a barbell through the tongue or ring through the lip, but can also include the labret (the area between the lower lip and chin), the uvula and the cheeks — with the jewelry coming in all sorts of styles and metals.

The Risks of Oral Piercings:

As ‘cool’ as it looks, the side effects to your oral health can be downright dangerous. Your mouth contains millions of bacteria and as with any puncture would or incision, pain, swelling and infection are high on the list of potential side effects, as well as:

• Your mouth and tongue could swell to the point of blocking off your airway

• Choking on the jewelry if it breaks off in your mouth

• Cracking a tooth (or teeth) if you accidently bite down too hard on the piercing as well as constantly clicking the jewelry against your teeth can cause injury to your gums and damage to any fillings

• Oral piercings can increase saliva flow and hinder your ability to pronounce words correctly

Some of the more serious side effects to occur are:

• Serious infection(s) can lead to hepatitis or endocarditis

• Nerve damage: oral piercings may cause your tongue to be numb — usually its temporary, although permanent nerve damage can happen

• If a blood vessel is wounded during the piercing, there could an excessive bleeding and serious blood loss

• Compromise the results of dental X-rays

Precautions to take:

If you do decide on getting an oral piercing, you should always be cautious of the place doing the piercings:

• Is the establishment clean?

• Do they have an infection-control policy posted?

• Are they using new/sterilized needles?

Tips to help avoid infections/complications:

After you’ve received your new piercing(s), be sure to keep the site clean by:

• Using a mouth rinse after every meal

• Disinfect your oral jewelry regularly as well as brush it the same way you brush your teeth

• Be sure to remove it when and if you are playing sports

• Most importantly, see your dentist professional regularly.

If you notice or experience any signs of an infection such as swelling, pain, fever, chills, or shaking, reach out to your dentist or physician immediately.

---

Anaida Deti a registered dental hygenist and the founder and CEO of Dental X Dental Hygiene Clinics - @DentalXSmiles. She is an active member and trainer with the Canadian, Ontario and Toronto Dental Hygienists Association (ODHA), and was elected as the ODHA ambassador for Toronto North. Deti has made it her mission to not only educate patients on the importance of dental health, but to also be an oral health educator for dental conventions where she is a coveted speaker. Connect with her @anaidadeti or www.dentalx.ca