6 fun facts and tips to enjoy a spooktacular...
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Oct 22, 2016  |  Vote 0    0

6 fun facts and tips to enjoy a spooktacular Halloween

Etobicoke Guardian

WHAT DOES A HOUSE DISPLAYING A TEAL PUMPKIN MEAN?

A teal pumpkin indicates the homeowner is shelling out treats safe for kids with allergies or with food-related illnesses, www.foodallergy.org reports. The Teal Pumpkin Project is an international campaign launched in 2014 by Food Allergy Research & Education to provide alternative Halloween treats for kids with allergies and those who can’t eat candy. Last year, homeowners in 50 U.S. states and 14 countries participated in the awareness campaign, FARE reported. Visit www.foodallergy.org/teal-pumpkin-project/about to download free printable signs and posters to explain the meaning of your teal pumpkin.

IF NOT CANDY, WHAT TO SHELL OUT?

There are tons of options to shelling out the traditional trick-or-treat chocolate bars, candies and potato chips the little superheroes, ghosts and princesses crave. Try stickers, Halloween jewelry, balls, Slinkys, glowsticks or pencil toppers or erasers. Dollar stores can prove a treasure trove of fun Halloween items for kids.

HOT HALLOWEEN ADULT COSTUME TRENDS

Jump on the Internet. There’s a litany of articles on costume trends for 2016. Dress as your favourite celebrity, sports star or historic figure. Remember the late Prince or David Bowie. Or get ghoulishly glorious with creative, elaborate makeup ideas.

DON'T FORGET FIDO!

Halloween pet costumes are a red-hot industry.

Go galactic and dress Bailey or Bella as R2D2, Chewbacca, Darth Vader or Princess Leia. Maybe your pooch prefers the Wonder Woman, Batman or Superman look. Or try on a new trend, the so-called “stand-up” costumes with false limbs, like the cowboy or cowgirl, police officer and firefighter.

STAY SAFE.

The Canadian Red Cross reminds parents of these Halloween safety tips. Use reflective tape to costumes. Keep costumes short to avoid tripping hazards. Use face paint rather than masks. Remind children to walk on sidewalks and look both ways before crossing the street. Trick-or-treat on one side of a street then the other.

Blown your Halloween budget? You’re not alone.

Last year, Canadians spent approximately $1 billion, yes billion, on Halloween costumes, candy and décor, the Retail Council of Canada reported. That’s more Halloween spending per capita than our American neighbours.

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